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  • An Inner Darkness – Scenario Anthology Kickstarter


    PoC

    Golden Goblin Press have launched a crowd funding campaign to create a new anthology of 1920s adventures for Call of Cthulhu.

     

    The Kickstarter for An Inner Darkness promises five to seven scenarios with a core theme where "Investigators battle against cosmic horrors while fighting for social justice..."

     

    Golden Goblin plans to present historically accurate and challenging adventures featuring mature themes, offering a "... darker, harsher and more brutal tone than our fans might be used to".

     

    Contributing authors include: Jeffrey Moeller, Brian Sammons, Helen Gould, Charles Gerard and Oscar Rios, with art by Rueben Dodd. The Kickstarter runs until 15th April and has an estimated delivery date of November 2019.

     

    Source: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/golden-goblin-press/an-inner-darkness-for-7th-edition-call-of-cthulhu/

     

    Note: This is a sponsored news item kindly supported by Golden Goblin Press.



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    daemonprinceofchaos

    Posted

    I really wish I could get behind this project for a number of reasons. Oscar Rios, Brian Sammons, and Jeff Moeller tend to be up there as some of my favorite CoC writers. I've even enjoyed Helen's work with Stygian Fox and while I haven't read anything by Charles Gerard his scenario concept is the most interesting among them all. But I have some pretty serious reservations.

     

    While I loved a lot of Golden Goblin Press's original content I've slowly grown more and more disappointed with each release and I have backed them all. I think De Horrore Cosmico was their high point for me. I found Legends of New Orleans to be a mix of good and bad material, not as good as Islands of Ignorance or De Horrore Cosmico but still worth the cost just barely. The same cannot be said for Tales from the Caribbean which was a major disappoint in every way. From completely baffling layout choices to poorly conceived and executed scenarios (some of which were frankly unplayable) I found the book to be basically useless. I ultimately only found one scenario worth playing with two being so bad to not even finish reading and the rest requiring some major rewrites for any of my three player groups.

     

    I can give credit where credit is due though, Goldin Goblin's history has been mostly positive and what good books they've put out I have enjoyed quite a bit. Their Kickstarters are generally painless and fun. I honestly can't recommend Islands of Ignorance and De Horrore Cosmico enough both are fantastic books and should be purchased without hesitation.

     

    While a slow decline in quality would be enough to spark some hesitation, which might be tempered by the stellar line up this book as if it weren't for my next two reservations.

     

    First is my concern about the content of this book. I think the issues raised by the authors are valid ones that deserve attention, all of them, both in our modern day and when we look at history. My issue is that I fear these scenarios will suffer from a series of problems that I find plague all similarly conceived scenarios. First, these scenarios will require a very specific group of players and GMs, players who are comfortable dealing with the Klan, discussing rape, racism and mental health issues. Unfortunately, between my three groups this sets off a lot of alarm bells and I'd likely need to make a spreadsheet to figure out which scenarios DON'T give someone OOC discomfort. I don't want this to seem like I'm discouraging these subjects, but when the entire book is based around them it makes it harder than if these scenarios were spread across say plethora of books. Ultimately I would need to read each scenario thoroughly to see it was even viable for my groups and because I can't that means I might be buying a book full of scenarios that would do nothing but make my players uncomfortable with their core conceits. This is compounded by some offense I took with the cover of Heroes of Red Hook which I found particularly distasteful to my own identity so I'm a tad hesitant to trust these subjects will be handled well. 

     

    My second issue is that it seems like the Mythos is taking a backseat in these scenarios which is not my personal preference. The Mythos is cosmic unrestrained horror at its destructive capabilities and malignance trump anything mankind could dream up even in our most diseased minds. I generally dislike stories and scenarios that boil things down to humans using the Mythos for their own evil purpose or that try to paint specific humans as the 'real monsters'.  Again this is just my personal taste, I have enjoyed scenarios where the Mythos and human evil are adjacent, but not when the Mythos is relegated to the status of a simple McGuffin or flavor for an otherwise mundane human adversary. Given the fact that only one of the scenarios evens hints at what the specific mythos involvement is I fear this will be the case. It seems like one could swap the Deeps Ones with frat boys, and whatever other elements exist could be cut out without changing the scenarios much at all. This is an issue for me which makes a lot of the scenarios seem less interesting than they might otherwise. That and without knowledge of which elements of the Mythos are involved I can't say which of them might fit in my games, I know one has deep ones means it can fit in one group's game but that's all I know at this point. Hopefully, as the campaign continues more will be revealed.

     

    None of this is to say that I will be writing off An Inner Darkness, the truth is I WANT TO BUY IT! But between all of my previous concerns and the steep price for a physical book I can't jump into this campaign as I have in the past. I will continue to follow this Kickstarter with hopes that Golden Goblin Press with show off something that makes me join.

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    4Acrossisemu

    Posted

    Remember when CoC was about cosmic horror? I vaguely do. 

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    willmize

    Posted

    Pepperidge Farms also remembers.

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    TacoBill

    Posted

    Shipping prices to Europe do seem remarkably high.

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    crazy_cat

    Posted

    I've backed and liked previous GGP Kickstarters. But, this one isn't really grabbing my interest so much - and the $65 price tag for POD in the UK pretty much kills what interest was left.

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