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  • Pulp Cthulhu: The Two-Headed Serpent


    PoC

    Chaosium have released The Two-Headed Serpent, the first supplement for Pulp Cthulhu, described as "An Epic Action-Packed and Globe-Spanning Campaign" from the pens of Paul Fricker, Scott Dorward and Matthew Sanderson.

     

    The 272 page campaign is currently out in PDF directly from Chaosium (purchase of which entitles you to a discount on the upcoming print release) and features "...nine adrenalin-fuelled adventures, Keeper advice, gorgeous full-colour maps and player handouts". There's already been some discussion about The Two-Headed Serpent in the forums and I know MartyJopson (of the CBC) has been itching to run it. :-)

     

    In case you missed it, late last year I interviewed Mike Mason (principal author of Pulp Cthulhu) about Chaosium's new Cthulhu setting.

     

    The Two-Headed Serpent
    An Epic Action-Packed and Globe-Spanning Campaign for Pulp Cthulhu

     

    The world needs heroes, now more than ever.

     

    The Two-Headed Serpent is an action-packed, globe-spanning, and high-octane campaign set in the 1930s for Pulp Cthulhu. The heroes face the sinister conspiracies of an ancient race of monsters hell-bent on taking back a world that was once theirs.

     

    Working for Caduceus, a medical aid organisation, the heroes will loot a lost temple in the forests of Bolivia, go head-to-head with the Mafia in New York City, face a deadly epidemic in the jungles of North Borneo, uncover the workings of a strange cult in dust-bowl-era Oklahoma, infiltrate enemy territory inside an awakening volcano in Iceland, face the horrors of hideous medical experiments in the Congo, race to control an ancient and powerful artifact on the streets of Calcutta, and ultimately travel to a lost continent for a desperate battle to save humanity from enslavement or annihilation!

     

    Packed with nine adrenalin-fuelled adventures, Keeper advice, gorgeous full-colour maps and player handouts.

     

    Price: $22.50 (US)

     

    Source: http://www.chaosium.com/the-two-headed-serpent-pdf/

     

    two-headed-serpent-front-cover.jpg two-headed-serpent-back-cover.jpg pulp-cthulhu-character-sheet.jpg



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    Congrats, Paul! Can't wait to pick this up.

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    I am excited to run this. The book (well the pdf at least) looks great and from what I have read so far, it is full of great stuff. I shall provide a review on the next Breakfast Club - spoiler free ;-)

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    Posted video by Chaosium of the print edition:

     

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