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Agent_Donald

Is there a setting unsuitable for CoC

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Langdale

If you didn't know, the Strange Aeons book for CoC (BRP) has one scenario set in Elizabethan London. Its called The King of Shreds and Patches. Its about a small cult trying to summon Hast... oops. He Who Should Not Be Named to earth. The Investigators get to fight the King In Yellowe, meet William Shakespeare, and of course potentially all go insane. The scenario comes with rules for Wheellock pistols, as well as stats, stats for the Plague, and a listing of common vocabulary during the time. Its really very good.

There are to more scenarios in the book as well. One is called The Garden of Earthly Delights, it takes place in 1597 in Spain and PC's play members of the Inquistion sent to investigate rumors of a virgin birth.

The other is called Blood Moon, and takes place in 2015 on the moon, and involves an investigation after one member of the moon research base turns up dead, and another goes insane.

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rylehNC

the only ideas I have Teletubbyland & Little House on the Prairie (1870's Kansas).

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Thorulfr

We should set a challenge - What would be the hardest setting to shoe-horn in Mythos material?

 

OK, take any scenario of the "Weird old theatre and a show that goes slowly off the rails" scenario.....

 

....and set it in The Muppet Show

I mean - just what is Gonzo the Great, anyway?? 8)

 

 

 

 

Of course, for the truely sick and twisted (Hastur help us), set the scenario in "Meet the Feebles" ...

<duck, grin, run>

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Hexelis

Fear is a human emotion, Whenever or wherever there are humans you can exploit their fear. I think the Mythos works anywhere it just takes an imaginative Keeper and PC's. :)

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cynick
Fear is a human emotion, Whenever or wherever there are humans you can exploit their fear. I think the Mythos works anywhere it just takes an imaginative Keeper and PC's. :)

Paleolithic cave-men will certainly be afraid. Then they will very quickly be lunch. You can't fight the forces of the Mythos with a flint axe.

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Langdale

But my players will try eventually......

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Hexelis

Nor can you fight the Mythos with guns, or bombs or tanks, you can only run mad and screaming into the merciful arms of death :twisted:

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Nollvane

Some of Lovecraft's revision stories have "western" elements. "The Mound" and "The Curse of Yig" come to mind. (I forget the collaborating author, I think it was Hazel Heald.)

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Rusty-Spoon

I've just started running a playtest of my Cthulhu Nationals Scenario for Battlemasters next year, which my players have nicknamed "Call of Chav-lhu" - how unsuitable this will turn out to be remains to be seen, but it is a lot of fun . . . :wink:

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red_bus
which my players have nicknamed "Call of Chav-lhu" - how unsuitable this will turn out to be remains to be seen, but it is a lot of fun . . . :wink:

 

New item - the mystic cloak of Burb-brey which renders the wearer invisible to any fellow cultists.

 

OR

 

The Medallion of 9KT, a huge weighty (fake) gold medallion used as a cult symbol - 1D6 SAN loss for the sheer awfulness of the design

 

etc etc...

:D

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The_Silent_One
Some of Lovecraft's revision stories have "western" elements. "The Mound" and "The Curse of Yig" come to mind. (I forget the collaborating author, I think it was Hazel Heald.)

Zealia Bishop, methinks.

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cjbowser

Zealia Bishop, methinks.

 

Close. Her full name is Zelia Bishop Reed.

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Nollvane
Close. Her full name is Zelia Bishop Reed.

 

Oh, you guys are right. Thanks.

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cynick
Some of Lovecraft's revision stories have "western" elements. "The Mound" and "The Curse of Yig" come to mind. (I forget the collaborating author, I think it was Hazel Heald.)

Hardly a collaborating author - it seems all she did was provide a few sketchy ideas which HPL then completely fleshed out.

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Nollvane
Hardly a collaborating author - it seems all she did was provide a few sketchy ideas which HPL then completely fleshed out.

 

Very true, but one thing she apparently contributed was the western setting, something HPL otherwise rarely used.

 

As for the "inappropriate setting" query, I think it would be difficult to introduce mythos elements into a cartoon setting (like Steve Jackson's TOON game) without changing one flavor or the other quite a bit.

(OTH, introuducing cartoon elements into "real life" could be quite scary, like the "Good Life" segment of Twilight Zone, the Movie.)

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Laggy

Do you have a setting or time period where you have a hard time adding the Mythos to it?

 

Maybe Cthulhu among the protozoa?

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Anaxphone
As for the "inappropriate setting" query, I think it would be difficult to introduce mythos elements into a cartoon setting (like Steve Jackson's TOON game) without changing one flavor or the other quite a bit.

 

Like "Crawl of Catchoolu"? Someone has even done a version of it incorporating Delta Green here.

 

Anaxphone, and I think the "Call of Scooby-Doo" games my wife and I run manage to be faithful to both sources.

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Nollvane

Like "Crawl of Catchoolu"? Someone has even done a version of it incorporating Delta Green here.

 

Anaxphone, and I think the "Call of Scooby-Doo" games my wife and I run manage to be faithful to both sources.

 

I'm not saying it wouldn't be fun. I guess I'd just have to see it to believe it. :D

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Benny

I've been wondering for a long time for a Caveman-Cthulhu era scenario.

 

However, how could the players communicate between themselves? By imitating animal noises? Using gestures? Facial expressions?

 

Seems funny at the beggining, but have serious I doubts if this could make a scenario convincing - or pratical.

 

As for Wild West Cthulhu, I found it very easy to create the right atmosphere: One player was the Sherif, another a Mexican sallon owner, there was also the traditional town drunk, an Indian, a professional gambler and a funeral agent.

 

We had a scenario that took place in a Mississipi riverboat, another in a deserted Cavalry fort, an abandoned mine, a stagecoach robbery, and a scenario that took place during the construction of a railway line, with Chinese cultists. All the cliches were there! :lol:

 

I also remember that, somehow, the Sherif ended up having two Byakees in jail and that the funeral agent buried some poor guy alive, just because he was a suspected cultist. 8O

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Balbinus
I've been wondering for a long time for a Caveman-Cthulhu era scenario.

 

However, how could the players communicate between themselves? By imitating animal noises? Using gestures? Facial expressions?

 

By talking, if by cave men you mean Neanderthals or Cro-Magnons.

 

Ice age CoC would be eminently doable, Cro-Magnons are basically us with less technology.

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Balbinus
I would be quite interested in an Elizabethan London setting - with Cthulhu. Lots of court intrigue, the New World is just opening up with lots of interesting imports from foreign lands, London is expanding and England flexes its muscles abroad. You would have to play gentry though, it would be horror enough playing a lowly serf or worse, a pure finder… 8O 8O

 

I've run an Elizabethan CoC campaign with great success, it works extremely well, IMO one of the best potential settings out there.

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Thorulfr

I've run an Elizabethan CoC campaign with great success, it works extremely well, IMO one of the best potential settings out there.

 

You also have the persistant legends of a "grand gathering of witches" that cast a spell to raise a storm to scatter the Spanish Armada.

 

The book Lammas Night by Katherine Kurtz includes the event as part of its backstory.

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MarkRyan

I too have run an Elizabethan campaign and I have to agree it is probably the best time period yet to be fully explored through a supplement.I was toying with writing one up until I changed jobs last year (don't have the time now) but if anyone wants my notes,just ask.

 

cheers

 

corpse-eater

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CAThompson

I think Hyperborea could be hard to run because it's a different world, the players would have some Mythos knowledge and the game would have a definate fantasy feel. The same could be said for a Muvian game, anywhere that the civilization is openly accpting of some of the mythos immedately removes much of the elements of traditional Cthulhu. Though maybe some kind of "the fall of..." game with these could work.

 

Also the more fantasy elements that get added the less the game will feel like Cthulhu, a Cthulhu in Spaaaaaaace game could come off like the movie Event Horizion, or even warhammer 40k well within the feel of cthulhu. Or it could come of as Star Wars and be totally lost (It is hard to be scared by the alieness and evil of a shoggoth when your ship can fire on it from orbit.)

 

And I keep flip-floping on a Three Kingdoms era setting for China. On the one hand I love the story and all that so natrually I'd love to play. On the other there's already a coherent system of magic there and the mythos might seem out of place.

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Benny
By talking, if by cave men you mean Neanderthals or Cro-Magnons.

 

Ice age CoC would be eminently doable, Cro-Magnons are basically us with less technology.

 

I meant the Neanderthals! Roleplaying without speaking would really be a challenge. I don't really know if Neanderthals were unable to speak, but I prefer following the cliches.

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