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FunGuyfromYuggoth

Britannica - Oi! Yanks! No!

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Nodens

Maybe I'm an old 36 but I don't remember even learning U.S. history in 'grade' school, and I'm a product of the American educational system. My home town is also supposed to have the "best schools in the state."

 

Truth be told though, did any of us really learn anything useful in grade or middle school? I didn't learn anything remotely beneficial until college. I soaked up information at California University like a shoggoth soaks up animal matter.

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malcojones

The 'city' in FunGuy's article is old (medieval cathedral) but had huge new housing estates grafted on in the 60s so that it became more like a 'new town' (e.g. Milton Keynes) where the Fens meet the A1. It had a mall quite early for a British town, which really helped a lot, and the whole thing is surrounded by a road system of roundabouts, dual carriageways and identical landscaping to make getting lost guranteed. Seen from the air I imagine the whole place looks like a Yellow Sign symbol. Best, malcojones

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Mr_Lin
It had a mall quite early for a British town, which really helped a lot, and the whole thing is surrounded by a road system of roundabouts, dual carriageways and identical landscaping to make getting lost guranteed. Seen from the air I imagine the whole place looks like a Yellow Sign symbol. Best, malcojones

 

Sounds like every other British newtown. I'm from Redditch and the road system is exactly as you describe. The funny thing is, once you get used to it, driving around the place is very easy and very quick. How many other towns of 80,000+ people can you drive across in less than ten minutes? It's only outsiders who get lost. Local roads for local people. :wink:

 

Was in Las Vegas a few weeks back and that seemed very similar, just on a much larger scale. Think the newtown template originated in the US?

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Tigger_MK4

Was in Las Vegas a few weeks back and that seemed very similar, just on a much larger scale. Think the newtown template originated in the US?

 

I believe so.

 

Its surprisingly easy to get use to as well (speaking as someone who moved to Milton Kenyes recently)..but it does confuse tourists !

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Mr_Lin

[quote name="Tigger_MK4

Its surprisingly easy to get use to as well (speaking as someone who moved to Milton Kenyes recently)..but it does confuse tourists ![/quote]

 

Now there's a funny thing. Visited Milton Keynes a few years back and completely lost my bearings. Haven't had that difficulty in other new towns e.g. Telford. The landscaping in MK does seem very uniform though and I think that's what did for me. Everywhere looked the same.

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Tigger_MK4
Its surprisingly easy to get use to as well (speaking as someone who moved to Milton Kenyes recently)..but it does confuse tourists !

 

Now there's a funny thing. Visited Milton Keynes a few years back and completely lost my bearings. Haven't had that difficulty in other new towns e.g. Telford. The landscaping in MK does seem very uniform though and I think that's what did for me. Everywhere looked the same.

 

 

Thats cyclopean geometry for you....

 

:) :twisted:

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Cosmoline
As a Brit living in America I can second the above comments. I was once asked by a native why I was planning on going to work on July 4th with the immortal line "Don't they celebrate July 4th in England?".

 

I remember when I lived in western Louisiana in the 1970's nobody celebrated the 4th of July. For all the yapping about how Americans have no historical memory, those folks had never forgotten the War of Northern Aggression. Fireworks were set off for New Years instead, which seemed far more sensible.

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jeremiah

 

The English think 100 miles is a long way

 

100 miles is a long way. I live in London. Within a 100 mile radius of me live more people than in Australia, New Zealand and Luxembourg combined!

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cynick
The English think 100 miles is a long way

100 miles is a long way. I live in London. Within a 100 mile radius of me live more people than in Australia, New Zealand and Luxembourg combined!

It's entirely relative. This island of ours, Great Britain has an area of 219,000km². To pick an American state totally at random, Texas (admittedly the second largest state in the union) has an area of 696,241km² - significantly larger than us you might agree. GB could quite easily fit into Texas a number of times and enjoy better weather as well.

 

However, the first European to set foot in Texas did so in 1528. Not much history there. As Eddie Izzard says "I'm from Europe, where the history comes from".

 

And who the hell wants to live in Luxembourg anyway?

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FunGuyfromYuggoth
And who the hell wants to live in Luxembourg anyway

 

Um, the Luxembourgians? :idea:

 

The stable, high-income economy features moderate growth, low inflation, and low unemployment.
8)

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Gallowglass

"Ah Belgium man! Belgium!!"

 

:oops: Sorry, couldn't resist...

 

Nick Middleton

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Anaxphone
100 miles is a long way.

 

Difference in perspective. I live in the boondocks and put 100+ miles on the car just getting to and from work each day.

 

Anaxphone, and yes, the rise in gasoline prices is eating up a noteworthy chunk of my income

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Tigger_MK4
100 miles is a long way.

 

Difference in perspective. I live in the boondocks and put 100+ miles on the car just getting to and from work each day.

 

Anaxphone, and yes, the rise in gasoline prices is eating up a noteworthy chunk of my income

 

Speaking of perspective... try buying it at $1.50- $2 per *litre* which is the price in the UK and has been for some time.

(I think thats just under $6 per gallon but I'm not sure)

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FunGuyfromYuggoth

http://www.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,30100-13512852,00.html

 

1386465.jpg

 

UK News

Look - no hands 'My Blonde Moment'

Updated: 11:39, Thursday March 09, 2006

 

A woman fined for applying her make-up with both hands while driving has defended her actions, saying she was having "a blonde moment".

 

Donna Marie Maddock, 22, said she simply wanted to look her best for a date.

 

She told The Sun: "It is what I would call one of my blonde moments. I am so blonde it is untrue when it comes to things like that.

 

"I must have looked like Penelope Pitstop driving along slapping the make-up on, but it's something all women do - I can't see what the fuss is about."

 

Maddock said she had decided it was "glam time" when she hit a quiet section of road on the 90-minute drive to her lover's house.

 

She was fined £200 for the offence on the A499 in north Wales - said to be one of the most dangerous roads in Britain.

 

Maddock used part of her left arm to steer the car and her left hand to hold her make-up pot, while with her right hand she applied eye-shadow without using a mirror.

 

She added: "All my friends think it's hilarious and have admitted to me they have done exactly the same. They've just never been caught."

 

Maddock, who appeared in a Burberry bikini in the Chav Babes calendar, has been blasted for her actions.

 

A spokesman for North Wales Police said: "A car is a dangerous lump of metal in the wrong hands. You need to be in control at all times and Miss Maddock's actions beggar belief."

 

Maddock will not be driving for a while, however. Last week she was banned for 20 months for drink driving.

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Mr_Lin
Chav Babes

 

Eh? An oxymoron surely? You mean there's people who get their jollies gawping at shovel faced bints with Croydon face lifts? There's some bloody strange folk about.

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ThothAmon

IQ of a naked mole rat and dressed in Burberry?

 

Maddock, who appeared in a Burberry bikini in the Chav Babes calendar, has been blasted for her actions.

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

 

It was for women like this that the phrase "stupid cow" was invented.

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Quiller

As the subject of percieved British-ness (particularly to the yanks) is of some interest to me - mainly due to the fact that most US produced films continue to be cliche`d and way wide of the mark - I thought I'd resurrect this old chestnut.

 

By the way, why is it that in US kid's cartoons, the bad guy always has a British accent? Hollywood, too. Look at Jeremy Irons in Dungeons & Dragons - although, best not eh? And can that be construed as racist? Mmmm, I wonder.

 

I don't think 'Britishness' can be easily defined. I mean, look at the cultural differences (not to mention marked differences in dialect) from one area to another. Place a Geordie, Scouser, Brummie and a few assorted others in the same room and you'll understand what I mean. It'd be like an inter-galactic convention, for heaven's sake!

 

Before I depart, here's another interesting aspect of Britain - though I'm thinking particularly of England here - and that is county nicknames. For instance:

 

I'm from the fenlands of Lincolnshire, so I'm a Yellowbelly (and proud-of-it-thenk-you-very-much).

If you are from Sunderland you are a 'Monkey Hanger,' whilst anyone from Wiltshire is a 'Moonraker.'

 

All of these have historical origins behind the name (did those fine people of Sunderland really hang a poor monkey during the Napoleonic wars, believing it to be a Frenchman?) Anyhow, I'm sure there are plenty of other examples too.

 

Finally, what exactly are the origins of the word 'Yankees?' Is it really derived from the native American term for English. If so, how ironic is that? :wink:

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Quiller

As the subject of percieved British-ness (particularly to the yanks) is of some interest to me - mainly due to the fact that most US produced films continue to be cliche`d and way wide of the mark - I thought I'd resurrect this old chestnut.

 

By the way, why is it that in US kid's cartoons, the bad guy always has a British accent? Hollywood, too. Look at Jeremy Irons in Dungeons & Dragons - although, best not eh?

 

And can that be construed as racist? Mmmm, I wonder.

 

I don't think 'Britishness' can be easily defined. I mean, look at the cultural differences (not to mention marked differences in dialect) from one area to another. Place a Geordie, Scouser, Brummie and a few assorted others in the same room and you'll understand what I mean. It'd be like an inter-galactic convention, for heaven's sake!

 

Before I depart, here's another interesting aspect of Britain - though I'm thinking particularly of England here - and that is county nicknames. For instance:

 

I'm from the fenlands of Lincolnshire, so I'm a Yellowbelly (and proud-of-it-thank-you-very-much).

If you are from Sunderland you are a 'Monkey Hanger,' whilst anyone from Wiltshire is a 'Moonraker.'

 

All of these have historical origins behind the name (did those fine people of Sunderland really hang a poor monkey during the Napoleonic wars, believing it to be a Frenchman?) Anyhow, I'm sure there are plenty of other examples too.

 

Finally, what exactly are the origins of the word 'Yankees?' Is it really derived from the native American term for English. If so, how ironic is that? :wink:

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Quiller

How on earth did that happen?

 

Two for the price of one, folks. Value for money. A very un-British concept if ever there was one!

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Nellkyn
If you are from Sunderland you are a 'Monkey Hanger,

 

All of these have historical origins behind the name (did those fine people of Sunderland really hang a poor monkey during the Napoleonic wars, believing it to be a Frenchman?)

I think you’ll find that it’s folk from Hartlepool that are called monkey hangers.

 

I don’t know if the story about hanging the monkey is true, I’ve heard it’s from some musical hall song. Once upon a time a quick way to start a fight in a Hartlepool pub would be to bring up the subject of hanging monkeys. Now the locals seem to almost proud of it.

 

A recent mayor of the place was some bloke dressed in a monkey costume going by the name H'angus the Monkey (Hang us the monkey). I’ve been lead to believe he lost his position as he was lending out the costume to his mates who were turning up to various functions pretending to be the mayor. How times change.

 

I’m from Redcar, south of the Tees from Hartlepool and we were regularly called ‘scaley backs’ in reference to our close association with the sea. :wink: Anyone from Middlesbrough, the nearest city, was ‘a smoggy’ due the large amount of smog produced by the place.

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Philulhu

There's a bit more information about it here.

 

The natives of Hartlepool are a bit more relaxed about the story now than they used to be. A guy I worked with had a friend who opened a gift shop down the coast in Whitby, a number of years ago. He made figurines out of seashells* to sell in the shop and for a laugh, made some monkeys with "Greetings from Hartlepool" on the base.

 

He was in his shop one day when a man burst in, swept the monkeys onto the floor and stamped on them. The man shouted, "Don't take the p*ss!" at the stunned shopkeeper and stormed out! 8O

 

I'm from Northumberland and like a lot of people who originated anywhere from the Scottish border to Teeside, I was just referred to as a Geordie once I got south of Leeds. :roll:

 

 

 

 

*If you've ever been to a UK coastal town, you'll know what I mean. Otherwise, they are shells glued together in the shape of people.

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Quiller

You're absolutely right - it is Hartlepool!! :oops:

 

But, then again, to a 'Swampy' like me (webbed feet from the fens?), everyone from the Tees northward is a Geordie...and now I guess I'd better duck low!

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Gallowglass
You're absolutely right - it is Hartlepool!! :oops:

 

But, then again, to a 'Swampy' like me (webbed feet from the fens?), everyone from the Tees northward is a Geordie...and now I guess I'd better duck low!

 

It's ok - the locals here in the City of the Sons of the Yew (aka Eboracum or Jorvik) and environs regularly refer to everything below the Humber as "France" - and everything west of Bradford as Wales and north of the Tyne as Scotland come to think of it...

 

:D

 

Nick Middleton (originally from Wurzel's country and still finding the North rather strange, even after a decade or more in residence...)

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Mr_Lin
You're absolutely right - it is Hartlepool!! :oops:

 

Similar story from my part of the world:

 

http://www.fweb.org.uk/dean/towns/ruardbears.htm

 

I think the Hartlepool thing mainly gets used as ammo by footie fans. I know the Wycombe Wanderers website, SMBU, described Hartlepool and their followers as "monkey murdering beach phlegm." Not very nice but I've got admit it made me laugh.

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ninthcouncil
You're absolutely right - it is Hartlepool!! :oops:

 

But, then again, to a 'Swampy' like me (webbed feet from the fens?), everyone from the Tees northward is a Geordie...and now I guess I'd better duck low!

 

When I lived in Folkestone I had a friend who regarded anyone from north of Ashford as a "bloody northerner". And that's Ashford, Kent, not Ashford, Middlesex... :roll:

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