Jump to content
LazerZ

"Rise from the Ashes" campaign setting and the Mythos

Recommended Posts

LazerZ

My current campaign is not strictly Lovecraftian, but such elements are a part of its setting. While doing some research for this setting it came to my attention that the Necronomicon had originally been written in the 8th Century according to Lovecraft's story of its origins. My campaign also takes place in a fantastic version of the 8th Century, so it occured to me to use the Necronomicon as a plot element. Now my party is pursuing a band of inhuman thieves bent on using the book for their own ends. These thieves, who stole the Hitab al-Azif from an associate of its late author, are in fact servants of Nyaralahotep who wishes that copies of the tome be proliferated.

 

Now my campaign isn't meant to focus solely on Lovecraftian themes, the Necronomicon merely serving as a motivation for a single player's character. However, Yog Sothothery is likely to be a major part of the campaign. If anybody has any suggestions as to specific elements to use I am open to them, in fact I have another thread specifically focusing on the more immediate course of my campaign in Cthulhu general. I have already decided that Averoigne is likely to be visited at some point, though the campaign focuses on the borders of Francia and Saxony.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dante7

Off of the top of my head, and just focusing on Abdul Alhazred and things connected to him...

 

Ibn Schacabao's "Reflections" was said to have been an influence on the Mad Arab, perhaps a thread to follow up there

 

Irem

 

And what ever happened to the invisible monster that killed Alhazred- does it still lurk around, and would it have any interest in his book and those who have had contact with it? 

 

invisible.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yronimoswhateley

Have you checked out "Cthulhu: Dark Ages" before?  It sounds like essentially the setting you are using, and the first edition of "Cthulhu: Dark Ages" at least (that's the one I'm familiar with) seems to do a great job of covering a lot of the social, political, economic, and esoteric realities of roughly the 5th-10th centuries, complete with some handy timelines, charts, tables, etc.; I understand the second edition was completely rewritten and takes an entirely different historical philosophy, but I've been told it does at least as good a job of describing the era.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sign in to comment.

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×