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notsogreatoldone

Don't Touch that Idol Gilligan!

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notsogreatoldone

So the 1963 J-Horror film Matango: Attack of the Mushroom People, based on W.H.Hodgson's  'Voice in the Night' has come up in a few discussions here.

 

So one thing that is apparent upon watching this flick is that the composition of the castaways in this film mirrors a more familiar group of castaways that appeared on American TV the next year.

 

A skipper of course.

An unreliable first mate (who favors a  red tee shirt).

A millionaire.

A professor.

A sultry vamp in show-biz.

An innocent girl next door type.

 

So what kind of Mythos troubles could our American castaways find themselves in?

 

"Deep, Deep Trouble."

 

The castaways discover a flooded Deep One temple in a sea-cave.  Gilligan is increasingly troubled by  recollections of his ill-favored relations from a decaying New England fishing village.

 

"Can't Get There From Here."

 

An uncharted, deserted island a day's sailing from Oahu? Not very likely. The storm that ship-wrecked them was supernatural, a rift between dimensions.

They're actually on an island of the Dreamland's Middle Ocean.  They've preserved a bubble of 'reality', that is going to collapse in time. Strange and alien constellations will appear in the night-time sky.  The  broadcasts they receive on their radio will become increasingly bizarre and cryptic, before ceasing altogether.  And then one day a galley from Dylath-Leen appears in the tiny cove.

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Mysterioso

Brilliant!

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DrMonster

The fun part is you really don't need to tweak things from the actual show much to get there.  The Shipwrecked Seven were menaced by scary South Sea islanders, timelost WW2 sailors and aviators, gangsters on the lam, a mad scientist from a previously unknown neighboring island, and a NASA robot.  Fits the dimensional bubble theory well.

 

Don't forget Philip M. Fisher's "Fungus Isle."  I read it before "A Voice in the Night."

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Dante7
5 hours ago, DrMonster said:

The fun part is you really don't need to tweak things from the actual show much to get there.  The Shipwrecked Seven were menaced by scary South Sea islanders, timelost WW2 sailors and aviators, gangsters on the lam, a mad scientist from a previously unknown neighboring island, and a NASA robot.  Fits the dimensional bubble theory well.

 

Wow...so...Land of the Lost, which was a dimensional bubble, too, then...

 

This sounds fun. Reminds me of when I killed off the Scooby Gang, Goober and the Ghost Chasers, and the Funky Phantom bunch in the van der Heyl Mansion

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Mysterioso

I have often thought that a Land of the Lost one-shot would be a lot of fun.  As I'm pretty sure there are write-ups for most of the dinosaurs kicking around somewhere, one really only needs to figure out stat blocks for the Sleestaks (primitive and evolved) and the Pakuni.

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notsogreatoldone

Time and space anomalies would  go a long way to explain the more nonsensical plots. And why is it that the Professor cannot turn that  transistor radio into a transmitter, I believe that that would be pretty doable.

 

While's its not  D100/BRP, Exile Studio's 'Hollow Earth Expedition' has  a good 'Land of the Lost/Pellucidar ' vibe. I had some notes on running it as a 'pocket-universe', with Valusian serpent-people, and Tcho-Tcho cannibals thrown into the mix, along with the mole-men,  descendants of Atlantis, Nazis,  dinosaurs, and cave-men.

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yronimoswhateley

I've actually dropped references into the YSDC wiki for both Sleestaks and Pakuni, as variations on "Serpent People" and "Voormis"/"Gnophkehs", respectively.  I definitely found the basic premise of the "Land of the Lost" TV show to be quite suitably Weird enough to cross the short distance from fantasy/sci-fi into Lovecraftian Weird pulp, especially considering that the first couple seasons were written by the likes of Larry Niven and Theodor Sturgeon!

 

From my "Lovecraftian" analysis and "Keeper's Notes" on "Land of the Lost":

 

"Though the family-friendly franchise lacks the menace associated with Lovecraft's work, the series does hover pretty close to the same territory, with the mysterious portals to an alien "pocket universe" world outside of time and space, the bizarre ancient ruins and lost and decaying weather- and time- and planet-control technologies scattered across the landscape, the Sleestak Serpent Men with their mysterious Sleestak god, the sufficiently-advanced Altrusian civilization desperately trying to avoid an inevitable fall into savagery, lost civilizations, ancient astronauts, etc....

 

"The basic premise is sound for a Call of Cthulhu campaign; just substitute pre-human Valusia, the Dreamlands, one of the caverns of the Lovecraftian Hollow Earth, or some similar Lovecraftian location for the Land of the Lost, trade in the dinosaurs for tentacle monsters, stock the place with a sufficient quantity of mysteries about the world to solve and clues to solve them with, stir in some conflict, and you're set to go with an exploration/investigation game involving an entire world...."

 

 

I'd never thought of "Gilligan's Island" as a potential source of ideas, though - I agree:  that's brilliant!   :)

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Dante7
On 15/07/2018 at 23:30, yronimoswhateley said:

I've actually dropped references into the YSDC wiki for both Sleestaks and Pakuni, as variations on "Serpent People" and "Voormis"/"Gnophkehs", respectively.  I definitely found the basic premise of the "Land of the Lost" TV show to be quite suitably Weird enough to cross the short distance from fantasy/sci-fi into Lovecraftian Weird pulp, especially considering that the first couple seasons were written by the likes of Larry Niven and Theodor Sturgeon!

 

And David Gerrold, most renowned for creating the tribbles, but also for the War Against the Chtorr series, did some of the world building.

 

On 15/07/2018 at 23:30, yronimoswhateley said:

"Though the family-friendly franchise lacks the menace associated with Lovecraft's work, the series does hover pretty close to the same territory, with the mysterious portals to an alien "pocket universe" world outside of time and space, the bizarre ancient ruins and lost and decaying weather- and time- and planet-control technologies scattered across the landscape, the Sleestak Serpent Men with their mysterious Sleestak god, the sufficiently-advanced Altrusian civilization desperately trying to avoid an inevitable fall into savagery, lost civilizations, ancient astronauts, etc....

 

The never-seen Sleestak god especially. Plus some of the truly strange stuff like the Builder. http://landofthelost.wikia.com/wiki/The_builder 

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