Jump to content
noahghola

Guillermo del Toro's "The Shape of Water

Recommended Posts

noahghola

We recently went to see del Toro's "The Shape of Water," and while we'll probably do a review over at Reckoning of the Dead soon enough, I wanted to get y'all's impressions if you've seen it. 

 

I won't post spoilers here, but broadly, while it's not an adaptation of Lovecraft, I felt like there were some real influences there (i.e. Deep Ones). I loved the film: thought the lead actor (Sally Hawkins) did a tremendous job, thought Michael Shannon made a great villain (like always), and enjoyed del Toro's inclusion of a diverse cast and characters.

 

Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
willmize

My wife and I went to see it over the New Years weekend, and absolutely loved it.

Every frame was beautiful, as opposed to the GrimDark of most movies. 
The acting was great, across the board, from main cast to supporting characters.

And how can you NOT love Doug Jones?
It's UNPOSSIBLE!

 

We were surprised as to how many people were actually in attendance!

The film's got legs, it's getting great word of mouth, and it's on quite a few of the Best Movies of 2017 lists.

 

Highly recommend, and you gotta see it on the big screen.

 

- Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oroborus

***Minor spoiler alert*** It is truly an amazing film. Apart from the subject matter, the cinematography, use of lighting, set design, dialogue, direction - well, everything about it was masterful. As for being Lovecraftian, there can be no doubt. Del Toro has been a long time Lovecraft fan and the "Gillman" was most certainly influenced by the Deep Ones if not Dagon. The heroine played by Sally Hawkins may have the Innsmouth gene, though not as portrayed in Shadow Over Innsmouth; nevertheless, it was an elegant interpretation. Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Travern

Although Del Toro's love for HPL's works is absolutely sincere, his creative worldview is fundamentally different from them, even the Dunsanian fantasies.  Here's how Del Toro describes his creature's true nature:
 

It is a river God. It’s not an animal. It’s a river God in the Amazon. There was never another one. There was him and Sally Hawkins put on Earth, and their entire existence they were going to each other. And they didn’t know. She was found in a river. No body knows who her parents were. She has these markings since she was a baby. He was in the river. The natives gave flowers. An American company came to drill oil. They killed the natives, saw the creature and said ‘Let’s cage it and take it out.’ That’s the story. And he’s been alone all of his life.

 

 

This explanation, although not spelled out so explicitly in the film, distinguishes it categorically from HPL's Deep Ones or Universal's Gill-man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Rookery

I saw this on Friday and loved it - Amelie meets Abe Sapien. Gorgeous visuals, cinematography, effects and score. I will eagerly see it again.

 

 

There was a treacherous part of my brain which did keep imagining the movie from the point of view of Strickland (Shannon) as a Delta Green agent rapidly losing his sanity and body-parts as the operation spiralled out of control.

 

His frustration with bullets and broken 'I knew you were a effin god...' resonates with so many agents meeting their end!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sign in to comment.

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...