Jump to content
Galbraith

Relevance of mythos experiences

Recommended Posts

Galbraith

In many scenarios, successful Cthulhu Mythos rolls are rewarded with a specific name-drop or identification of a mythos beastie or item. These to me have often seemed immersion-breaking, because they act as if some CM gained by being attacked by Mi-Go will suddenly grant you insights about the Great Race of Yith. Sometimes I've heard that this is justified by insane insights into the greater nature of the world, but that seems a little unsatisfying, and presumptive of a great deal of interconnectedness. How do you use CM in your games? Do you let rolls give players only information connected to their previous experiences? Do you paraphrase to avoid name-drops? Or do you see it as part of the game?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
GBSteve

I take it to include the wider experience of the Mythos, some of it revelatory in the religious sense but also I might suggest that, for example, reading about Cthulhu in the Necronomicon the character remembers seeing a footnote about the Mi-go and their mining habits.

 

Regarding names, I tend to almost not use them at all. I'll use metaphor for the main part or description. I also change the Mythos to make it unfamiliar, and hence more scary. After all, that was HPL's plan. And if I do mention a name, the thing it represents is almost certainly not what anyone read in the Monster Manual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gaffer

I use it to expand understanding, rather than specific information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Galbraith

I take it to include the wider experience of the Mythos, some of it revelatory in the religious sense but also I might suggest that, for example, reading about Cthulhu in the Necronomicon the character remembers seeing a footnote about the Mi-go and their mining habits.

 

Regarding names, I tend to almost not use them at all. I'll use metaphor for the main part or description. I also change the Mythos to make it unfamiliar, and hence more scary. After all, that was HPL's plan. And if I do mention a name, the thing it represents is almost certainly not what anyone read in the Monster Manual.

The name thing is something I've already been using heavily, but the footnote thing is something I'd not thought about. That's an elegant way to work in more specific info without straining the suspension of disbelief.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
eternalchampion

I would agree with GBSteve and Gaffer. It is a measure of your understanding of the “reality†and in this reality, yes, there is a kind of interconnectedness. As in the esoteric teaching of many cultures, the spiritual ascension leads to enlightenment and the understanding that All are One, venturing in to the Mythos might grand someone the negative aspect of enlightenment. So, as one learns more he/she begins to understand phenomena and events in a different light, like connecting some dots that didn’t seem related before.

All that happen in the mind and soul of the character. For me the roll represents the possibility the character can understand something useful out of it, for a specific situation in a scenario.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yronimoswhateley

I also agree with the above.

 

I think that, in-game, it's meant to model those moments in the Lovecraft stories where the narrator sees something weird, and then thinks it reminds him of something he read in a Poe story, or saw in a painting by Dore or Roerich or Simes, or saw mentioned in an eccentric's lecture on archaeology/mythology/astronomy/physics/whatever, or read in a mysterious and puzzling line of the Necronomicon...

 

In Lovecraft's usage, it's primarily for atmosphere.

 

In game terms, it can also help out a little bit with providing important clues for solving the mystery or defeating a monster or getting out of a mess in one piece or whatever.

 

But, in-game, I think it's still best used with atmosphere in mind - a nugget of useful information in a creepy and weird wrapper....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.