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Mortagon

The Void

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Mortagon

Has anyone else seen this? It's released on blue ray and dvd on the 7th of April and described as "pure cosmic horror" and a throwback to 80's creature films.

 

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Tony Williams

The trailer has me interested.

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fieldworking

I have to admit, I'm pretty stoked to see this movie. I've been hearing about it for a while, and I hope I haven't built myself up too much.

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Mortagon

The movie is out in the itunes store, and I finally got to watch it. I truly enjoyed it for the most part, with my only nitpicks being some questionable acting in a couple of scenes and some underdeveloped plotlines. The practical effects were top-notch and apart from a couple of scenes there didn't seem to be any CGI. The movie certainly deserves the tagline of "pure cosmic horror", as everything that is happening seems to be connected to some malignant alien force. I highly recommend this film to anyone that's interested in cosmic horror and 80's style monster movies like "the thing". I must give a warning however, as the film features many scenes with flashing lights.

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Tony Williams

It's available for rental on the major UK streaming sites too now.

 

Mostly enjoyed it, but was quite frustrated many times by the use of low-level ambient light in LOTS of scenes. Not sure if this was just a bad design choice, lack of technical checks or a conscious decision to help with the creature effects. There's a fine line to tread between displaying the monsters too much but I do think this tended to err on the wrong side ( especially since what I did see of the creature effects seemed pretty well done ).

 

I'm not sure if I missed something, or if I'm being thick, but I also can not for the life of me quite figure out how the father and his ( throat-injured ) son tie into all this ?!

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fieldworking

I thoroughly enjoyed The Void. As far as new horror films, this one rates quite highly for me. I felt that it dealt with Lovecraftian cosmic horror very well--better than most other such horror films that attempt the same. It certainly has flaws, but nothing that bothered me. I'll be watching for these filmmakers in the future.

 

I'm not sure if I missed something, or if I'm being thick, but I also can not for the life of me quite figure out how the father and his ( throat-injured ) son tie into all this ?!

 

I think it was just that the throat-injured son and the father lost their whole family to an attack by the cult, so they were trying to avenge this loss/stop the cult by killing everyone involved, victim or otherwise. At least, that was my take.

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yronimoswhateley

I watched this one last night, and enjoyed it quite a bit - it comes across as an homage to some of the better John Carpenter films ("The Thing", "Halloween", "The Fog", "Prince of Darkness", "In the Mouth of Madness", etc.), with some of the same sorts of original content with clear inspiration from Lovecraft, and I think that folks who enjoy those films will like this one.

 

I was actually doing some office work while watching it and, with all the distractions, I might be the one missing something, but in regard to how the characters fit in the film, I was under the impression....

 

 

Sheriff Carter and one of the nurses, Allison, were happily married until she lost her daughter in a freak accident of birth.  Carter, Allison, and Allison's father, the doctor who took a scalpel to the throat about halfway through the film, all took the death very hard:  Carter and Allison split up, while the older doctor went a little mad, and began trying to solve the mysteries of life and death through his own occult research, killing people and bringing them back from the dead - a project which, predictably for the genre, goes sour because they all "come back wrong" as Lovecraftian tentacle-monster horrors, and the things in the white robes.  The doctor, who considers his occult work altruistic, justifies this wrongness by comparing people to moths which look one way before going into the cocoon of death, and become something else on the other side (of course, in Call of Cthulhu terms the doctor is simply just a mad servant of the Mythos, making unreliable-narrator excuses for the awful work he's compelled to pursue)....  The doctor gets killed partway through the film, but comes back from The Void through a portal in the hospital's basement, to continue his work for the film's second half:  bringing his grand-daughter - the Sheriff's dead stillborn daughter - back from the Void as well...

 

 

 

Anyway, I rather enjoyed it, and had few complaints - it was a bit dark with flickering lights, but I think that sort of thing kind of comes with the territory of these films, like the dialogue being hard to hear sometimes (probably decades of being a gun collector and heavy metal fan have ruined my hearing, I have to watch all horror movies these days with closed captioning turned on, or I miss key bits of whispered or muffled or screamed dialogue distorted by avant-garde soundtracks and weird sound effects.....)

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fieldworking

 

Sheriff Carter and one of the nurses, Allison, were happily married until she lost her daughter in a freak accident of birth.  Carter, Allison, and Allison's father, the doctor who took a scalpel to the throat about halfway through the film, all took the death very hard:  Carter and Allison split up, while the older doctor went a little mad, and began trying to solve the mysteries of life and death through his own occult research, killing people and bringing them back from the dead - a project which, predictably for the genre, goes sour because they all "come back wrong" as Lovecraftian tentacle-monster horrors, and the things in the white robes.  The doctor, who considers his occult work altruistic, justifies this wrongness by comparing people to moths which look one way before going into the cocoon of death, and become something else on the other side (of course, in Call of Cthulhu terms the doctor is simply just a mad servant of the Mythos, making unreliable-narrator excuses for the awful work he's compelled to pursue)....  The doctor gets killed partway through the film, but comes back from The Void through a portal in the hospital's basement, to continue his work for the film's second half:  bringing his grand-daughter - the Sheriff's dead stillborn daughter - back from the Void as well...

 

 

Here's where I think you may have been mistaken as to what was going on (if I remember it correctly):

 

 

The doctor is not Allison's daughter. His daughter, who died long ago, was named Sarah. It is Sarah the doctor is working to bring back. Carter and Allison lost their child during birth (I think), but there's no relation to the doctor other than the fact that all of them have lost children.

 

 

I think I'm going to watch it again sometime soon.

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yronimoswhateley

I bet you're right, fieldworking, on reflection, because that would make sense of the one small part that didn't make sense to me until now...

 

 

I wasn't quite clear on what was going on with the pregnant teenager who the Sheriff met with an older relative (father, IIRC) in the waiting room when the Sheriff first arrived at the hospital:  later in the film, she was raving about how she was honored to be carrying the doctor's baby, and I couldn't quite figure out how that baby fit into the larger scheme of things, when it would have made more sense in my half-watching understanding for Allison to be having the doctor's grand-daughter....

 

I think what threw me off on that part was how friendly the doctor and sheriff seemed to be with each other, I'd gathered they were related in some way, and in-laws seemed to make the most sense. 

 

That they simply had similar losses in common with each other makes more sense though, both in terms of other things in the story fitting in, and in a storytelling sense of the Sheriff and Doctor sharing similar losses, but dealing with those losses in very different ways....

 

 

 

It's a small difference, but important in tying up that loose end.

 

I'll definitely watch it again sometime soon, when things have settled down enough that I won't have to do so much multi-tasking.

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Doctor_TOC

Finally got around to watching this last week. It took me a while to realise that it's a period piece - no mobiles or computers in evidence, and some truly awful non-LED torches!

 

  

What amused me is that the angry father and the mute son are clearly in the role of the PCs - they're hunting down the remainders of the evil cult they've wiped out after having their families murdered. For them, this is the last reel of the picture. For everyone else (and us) it's the beginning of the story.

 

I loved it though; it really is proper cosmic horror, and I've been thinking about it all week. Definitely need to watch it again soon.

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yronimoswhateley

Good catch, Doctor!  I did not at all realize it was a period film!

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