Jump to content
SJE

Curse of Nineveh

Recommended Posts

nclarke

We sort of stormed the lair with the police - only we got there early and stirred up a Russian emigre mob which chased us into the rear yard of the house. We entered the house quietly before the police raid and made our way downstairs just as the French opened up with a tommy gun on the police. The police returned fire (they'd been issued with firearms as they had been told the occupants were armed. (see the Sidney Street siege for a real life example). We had planned to enter the house by using the sewers as we'd located a way in via the engineering dept of the sewer/water company but a blown roll made us lose our way before using the arousing the Russians ploy as a distraction but we escaped via that route with a book and Puncheon leaving Sauvageot unconscious on the floor of the cellar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
christian

My players are starting to realise London 1925 is NOT Los Angeles 1935. I'd like to know how police would react if they realise characters have guns. Two of my characters, WW1 veterans, are carrying a handgun. One is a Lord, the other one a servant. They have just called police after finding McAvoy's body, and their first contact with police before that was quite peaceful. There is nothing shady here, they hav'nt broken a lock or anything, mainly slipped through a window, but how would police react and in what conditions would they bar people from carrying? Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nclarke

In the UK in the between-the-wars period a licence was required  from the local county police Chief Constable. Smooth-bore shotguns for rabbit or pigeon in a countryside environment should easy enough but obviously not during a visit to any city or town.

 

1920_Firearms_Act

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

I have a similar issue in my game having made the decision/mistake to allow one of my players to be a fairly highly placed Lord (allowing him to be well placed in the Masons was probably a worse move and definitely compounds the problem).  He's pretty well armoured against a lot of the rules that should cause issues with the police which means he often carries a revolver.  That said he and his retinue are making quite a name for themselves which is making them very visible to both The Children of Tranquility and Delgado.

 

On a side note I think one thing that is missing from a lot of The Curse of Nineveh is notes on the social standing and titles of the NPCs.  Given how class ridden London was in the 1920s it seems not to be taken into account in at least the first few chapters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nclarke

I suspect that the editors and authors of CoN may have fallen into the common perception when writing about material they are familiar with that everyone knows innately what they themselves do.

 

I know, having lived in the UK, Middle east and the States, things about various cultures that do not even show up on my local players horizons (they've never  lived more that 20 or 30 miles from where they were born). T For example there's a bit in the Zalozniyhi (sp) Quartet concerning the Empty Quarter of Saudi Arabia that seemed to be totally at odds with what I knew from living in SA for several years.

 

In other games and campaigns the assumptions of the authors about 'facts' associated with people and places often beggars belief for anyone who knows even a small amount about the true facts. The British class system as portrayed by US authors is riddled with poorly researched and even more poorly understood information so it's little wonder that Keepers who usually have no better experience fail to correctly portray the situation. The 7e Investigator's Handbook section on Useful Information for the 1920's has precisely two paragraphs (IIRC) of UK specific information and that covers the 1920's Firearms Act. A few minutes with Wikipedia could help out most non-Brits with details of how social status in the UK works between the wars. A film like Remains of the Day shows how that social structure reduced to a shadow of it's former self after WW2.

 

Chaosium's Monograph #0359 Kingdom of the Blind does a reasonable job of providing background to the UK in the 20's and 30's and Green and Pleasant Land has a certain amount of information but isn't quite up to the amount of data in KotB.

 

Nigel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SJE

So, we've now pretty much finished Chapter 4 and are heading into Paul Frickers chapter 6 + 7 (since we did Scott's Chapter 5 already).

 

Chapter 4 in fairness is fairly freeform, and I'm mostly ignoring the linearity of the later chapters as its much more a game of responses between the PC's and the various factions - for example after being repelled by the Guardian down in the Tube tunnels, they basically warned Campbell Thompson about what was happening so he could sic the police on it. They finally got to one of Delgado's Gatsby-like parties and party girl Neve enjoyed taking cocaine with all the Bright Young Things.

 

Now the game has turned into a cat and mouse game of trying to seize various artifacts- things are being stashed in bank vaults, forgeries being commissioned for sale to Malfada or Delgado, the British Museum and Campbell Thompson are also changing up their security and where they are stashing Elements, all the while as thugs tail people and vaults get raided.

 

Again some of the gaps between the chapters and editing errors are showing up- Delgado's house for example is better described in Chapter 6 instead of 4, and the idea that anything more could be stolen from the British Museum is starting to get laughable given everything that's happened before. I'm not sure why suddenly there are lots of maps in Paul's scenario, nor what they add except word count, and given the spell list on p11 (including a lot of non-7th ed spells) some of the occupants of room 28 make no sense (avoiding spoilers here). And a minor editing error amused me that you could peer through a window of and see Aloysius talking to Delgado (basically himself).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

I suspect that the editors and authors of CoN may have fallen into the common perception when writing about material they are familiar with that everyone knows innately what they themselves do....

 

Chaosium's Monograph #0359 Kingdom of the Blind does a reasonable job of providing background to the UK in the 20's and 30's and Green and Pleasant Land has a certain amount of information but isn't quite up to the amount of data in KotB.

 

I think there may be some of that but if that was the case I'd expect a note to say that they had a title or position with no explanation of what that means.  What I'm finding is more that there is no mention of anyone's social standing.

 

I'll definitely check out Kingdom of the Blind.  I've got Green and Pleasant Land and the Cubicle 7 London Britannica set which really does have an amazing amount of information on Britain in the 1920s, definitely a resource worth picking up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

What I could really do with looking ahead in the adventure is at least a sketch of the temple of Nabu.  I've read the descriptions a couple of times and tried to sketch it out and somewhere in my brain there is a disconnect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DavePerry

What I could really do with looking ahead in the adventure is at least a sketch of the temple of Nabu.  I've read the descriptions a couple of times and tried to sketch it out and somewhere in my brain there is a disconnect.

 

I found a floorplan for the Temple of Nabu on Google.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

Thanks, not sure that it exactly lines up with the description in the book.  It seems a bit of an oversight to publish maps of loads of random houses early on in the book but leave the location of the finale unmapped.

 

I think the bit that I'm probably struggling with is comparing this from the scenario

 

The temple is accessed through a set of doors leading into a small antechamber, but blocked by a great stone seal carved with images of the gods Nabu and Marduk. Recesses hold candles and

other votive offerings.On either side of the following chamber are three portals, one behind the other, formed by golden, winged bulls looking towards the great hall. The largest of these bulls is some 18 foot high, the smallest 12 foot.

 

with this from the journal of Campbell Thompson

 

 

The seal was rolled out of the way with no small effort, taking five of us to budge it, and then finally we were able to descend a short flight of steps into a great chamber, which offered up a view of such perfectly preserved history that it quite took our breaths away.

 

Three doorways on the western side of this chamber, similar to those on the eastern, led into as many distinct rooms, unconnected with each other. There were thus three magnificent portals, one behind the other, each formed by winged bulls facing the same way, and all looking towards the great hall; the largest colossi, those in front, being above 18 feet high, and the smallest, those leading into the inner chamber, about 12. It would be difficult to conceive any interior architectural arrangement more imposing than this triple group of gigantic forms, as seen in perspective by those who stood in the centre of the hall, dimly lit by our primitive torches, and harmoniously coloured or overlaid, like the cherubim in the temple of Solomon, with gold. At the upper ends of the two parallel chambers just described, were entrances opening into a room 82 feet by 24, whose walls were of the same unsculptured limestone.

 

I'm definitely not sure which are the two parallel chambers described.  It's probably me just being dense but a simple drawing would really help me visualise it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cjearkham

As I understand it, each gateway is like this:

 

gateway

 

There are three such gateways along each wall. In the diagram, the taller gateways are represented by rectangles sticking further out into the central room.

 

Nabu's Temple

 

And then, past the furthest (12 ft) pair of gateways are corner entrances (the dark boxes) into another chamber beyond.  The "two parallel chambers" are the two sets of three on either side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

Thanks that's really helpful.  I had something like that in mind but I think I read it as them facing the next room (up on your map) rather than thinking that the great hall was the room that was being described.  I thought it was probably some disconnect in my head.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
viz0id

SPOILERS FOR PLAYERS DONT READ!!!!

 

Hey guys. I'm running Curse of Nineveh as GM. My group has had 2 good sessions and are close to completing chapter 1. But theres some talk amongst them that caught my eye.

 

This statuette that they get from Neve, is really similar to the one that is stolen fra Brightman. And they are discussing that it can't be the same one as it doesn't fit with what they are being told. And then i started thinking, have i missed something?

 

They are closely discribed as looking like eachother but it seems like just one of them are important? Is the stolen one from Brightman just another relic that was taken from the temple? Then why not let it be something else? Are they adding confusion on purpose?

 

Did any of your groups pick up on this? Would love to hear your thoughts on this. I guess only one of them is part of the Elements of Release, but why have 2 golden statuettes depicting the same thing, if only one of them is the real deal?

 

I'm confused, and uncertain how i will handle this if my group gets caught up in there being another one of the same one they currently possess.

 

 

EDIT: Here is the quote from Collins (the butler of Brightman):

 

"Collins describes the statuette as a thing of pure evil,
unlike other representations of Nabu. It was crafted in
gold, depicting a twisted mockery of Nabu, half man-half
demon. The investigators may note the similarity to the
statuette given to them by Neve Selcibuc."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SJE

VizOid - check out posts #43 and #44 in this thread for the same question.

I think I'm in my last 2 weeks of the game. Two of the PC's are sneaking into the big house on Belgravia Square on the 8th June (basically a day after D got possessed) and things are starting to get weird- mirrors are working on a 10 second delay. Our journalists notepad is now filled with Latin in her handwriting talking about Essential Saltes and Raising Up. Malfada is scared of whoever is in the study, and Elphinstone has taken up chain smoking on the balcony and the servants are getting spooked and skittish.

Despite some earlier skepticism on my part, the maps of houses have become useful (though I never really used them previously).

The big problem I keep running across is the damned Journal of Reginald Campbell Thompson - it's depiction of the archaoelogist and his experiences make no sense compared to the man in the book- he's translated the tomb warnings, he knows Nabu should be eternally entombed and the Elements of Release kept safe, and yet he is pursuing a policy of moving the whole Tomb/temple and exhibiting the artefacts even as it becomes clear that the British Museum cant keep anything safe, being robbed of Assyrian artifacts on 5 seperate occasions! If the players didn't know that they get Sanity back for returning items back to the Museum, they'd quite rightly determine they would be much safer in various anonymous bank vaults. The Journal also casts a lot of suspicion on Brightman, mentions Delgado too early and generally undermines a lot of the plot that was written before the Journal was written and it just doesnt fit. Sadly about the best I can suggest is that you rip out certain pages from the Journal or otherwise explain that its an sanity reaction or mental disorder that is prompting Campbell Thompson to exorcise the horrors he's seen by rebuilding the dread temple and exhibiting the Elements of Release there in the heart of the Museum, because frankly it doesnt fit his motivation in the journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

I found the Journal of Neve really threw the start of the game into turmoil as it contained so many red herrings. When I realised that the dates in CTs journal didn't tie up with the timeline in the scenario (they're all prior to King's death) I decided it was safer just not to give the journal to them at all. I also knew my players would look at the information and just target CT as the villain.

 

I love the idea of the journals but they're too flawed for me to want to use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Helen

I've had similar issues with the journals. I didn't give them Neve's (the relationship with Archie didn't fit with what's in the adventure) and I wish they hadn't had CT's either. I had to have Bluffstone from the Club (if I've remembered the right name...) be away in the country with gout as there is no no on what he knows in the adventure. He might suffer from the Curse yet!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

I've pretty much got to the end of Bedlam and I'm not really sure where to go next.  They've rescued Puncheon and have captured Sauvageot and tomorrow we'll be starting the session in Sauvageot's basement with no police backup, etc.  I don't want to hit them too hard as they try to leave the building as I'm worried it'll come across as sour grapes for them managing to survive a gun battle in the house without a scratch (dice do very strange things sometimes).

 

They'll need to work out what they're going to do with Puncheon and I know CoT will still try to kill him and AD's men will still try to kidnap him but I don't want the whole thing to either drag on for session after session or have it seem like whatever they do I'll just steamroller over them as soon as they're not guarding Puncheon.  I'm a pretty new keeper so I'm not sure exactly which way to jump.  Any ideas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Helen

Assuming they now have to escape from the basement without Sauvageot's men stopping them, you could see if they spot the secret tunnel. If not, have the battle but tailor the number of enemies to your players. If they're not very good on combat, reduce the number. See how it goes. It should be challenging but not impossible. If they are sensible, one of them might escape and get police help. There were foot patrols around at the time. My players luckily did this before they went in (that doesn't help you, though!).

 

With Puncheon, it will depend what they do with him. If they send him back to Bedlam, will security be stepped up? Or will they send him elsewhere? Again, my players sent him 'away' to a mental hospital in Scotland (I think). If they just send him to Bedlam, with no security, feel free to have the CoT kill him. There is supposed to be a threat and the players need to be aware of it. Just have them told. It needn't drag on for multiple sessions - unless they decide to try and guard him themselves. But then they won't be able to all join in the rest of the adventure, so it's not really practical.

 

Hope that helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SJE

Campbell Thomas wound up getting Puncheon moved to Broadmoor for his safety in my game.

 

For Savageot, they wound up killing him without the guards being aware (due to the music) and just sneaked out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ragr

As has been pointed out previously, there are some inconsistencies within the campaign. With the CoT, keep them resource strapped but fanatical. They somehow managed to hire an assassin, who presumably failed to kill Puncheon, and that wouldn't have come cheap and may have wrecked their limited finances; the fact they went to such an extravagance suggests that they weren't confident of achieving the killing themselves. I would keep them dangerous when met but unable to reach far to achieve their aims. AD is another matter when it comes to resources but he can probably wait awhile to get hold of Puncheon as there's a fair gap between Bedlam and the parts of the campaign that follow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

Cheers guys.  That really helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
christian

The journals, I find, are useless. Neve's journal is  irrelevant, Campbell's journal could be excellent, is a great piece of fiction travel-writing, but casts events and characters in a light so different from the way they then appear during the campaign as to be useless. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DadsAngry

When I ran chapter 3, after the investigators rescued Puncheon they turned him over to Theodore Rayburn-Price. He got Neve to a safe place to hide so why not Puncheon. Once Rayburn-Price makes his exit the whereabouts and what happens to Puncheon is unknown. Maybe the CoT found him, maybe AD men found him, investigators don't know and have no leads to follow. The situation is out of their hands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

My players are about to question Sauveot in private.  I'm wondering about having the Delgado cast the same spell on Sauveot as he does on his minions so that they can't spill the beans (P26).  What do people think?  I don't want them to get anything out of Sauveot however hard they push him but I don't want to over play that spell.


Also in Chapter 4 if they do give the Horn of Alu to Delgado after meeting him what happens to it (and more importantly Delgado once he's taken possession of it)?  Any suggestions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UncleRiotous

Sorry guys looking for more advice. The players have found out that the Eye of Lamashtu is in the museum (it's still early January) and they're planning to swap it for a replica in the vain hope that it will stop the shadow gate mentioned in the scrolls from opening. If the Eye isn't in the BM then it can't be stolen and chapter five (which I'd be looking forward to running even if we didn't play in Croydon) can't happen.

 

I don't want to steamroller my players by having it stolen before they can get to it. Equally once they've made a swap I can't see how Mountford can get his hands on it (if CoT or Delgado steal it they're not going to leave it hanging about).

 

Any ideas for dealing with it in a non heavy-handed way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.