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ReydeAmarillo

Gaslight GOO

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ReydeAmarillo

Looking at Gaslight 3E for the first time in ages, I am becoming interesting in the GOO "Rhogog" mentioned there.

 

However, other than the Gaslight description and stats, not much else seems to be known about it. There seems to have been a story, but I can't find too much about that either.

 

Although, in many ways, the lack of info is useful, because I then have an almost empty page to work on with no canonical worries, it is also useful to know if there is already more background out there somewhere.

 

Does anyone know if there is more info about this obscure GOO that prompted its entry in Gaslight, or has anyone used this GOO and would kindly share their interpretations, please?

 

 I am toying with a witchcraft-druidic cult (hid during 17th C witchcraft trials, but now coming back) / fertility links to Shub Nig ("life is in the blood" and all that) / center of Epping forest (ten mile long forest to NE of London with a few Celtic hillforts guarding the then-border with another kingdom (tribe druids were original worshipers of Rhogog?))

 

Maybe even converting the Gaslight setting to a late Georgian one, Bow Street mounted patrols, highwaymen, small villages on the forest perimeter etc. 

 

NB - Yes, I know there is a Cakebread and Walton Bow Street Runners supplement out there, but I prefer to do my own conversion work and research.

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Mysterioso

If you do make a conversion to Georgian times, please consider posting it here.

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KRoss

I asked Scott Aniolowski about this when he first sent me that section, and he pointed out the story. Since then, all mention of the creature, story, and author seems to have disappeared from the internet.

 

There's probably a modern scenario idea in that situation somewhere...

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The_Tatterdemalion_King

Okay, so, taking the wikipedia article as a starting point—Rhogog is a creche of star-spawn biomass somewhere in the British Isles which seeps into local plant life. I guess you could go all Silent Spring and track the infection through the local ecosystem. I don't know enough about ancient British geology or agriculture to know if earthquakes could've revealed the creche suddenly during human history, or if that's an infection that locals would have had to manage the whole time. 

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JeffErwin

Looking at Gaslight 3E for the first time in ages, I am becoming interesting in the GOO "Rhogog" mentioned there.

 

However, other than the Gaslight description and stats, not much else seems to be known about it. There seems to have been a story, but I can't find too much about that either.

 

Although, in many ways, the lack of info is useful, because I then have an almost empty page to work on with no canonical worries, it is also useful to know if there is already more background out there somewhere.

 

Does anyone know if there is more info about this obscure GOO that prompted its entry in Gaslight, or has anyone used this GOO and would kindly share their interpretations, please?

 

 I am toying with a witchcraft-druidic cult (hid during 17th C witchcraft trials, but now coming back) / fertility links to Shub Nig ("life is in the blood" and all that) / center of Epping forest (ten mile long forest to NE of London with a few Celtic hillforts guarding the then-border with another kingdom (tribe druids were original worshipers of Rhogog?))

 

Maybe even converting the Gaslight setting to a late Georgian one, Bow Street mounted patrols, highwaymen, small villages on the forest perimeter etc. 

 

NB - Yes, I know there is a Cakebread and Walton Bow Street Runners supplement out there, but I prefer to do my own conversion work and research.

 

I have extensive notes on Epping Forest in the late 16th century for CoC, back when it was still called the Forest of Waltham (if you're interested). You'll want to check older sources under that name. Boadicea and the Suicide Pool are only part of the story. However, I'm personally rather fond of locating witch-cult activity in the vicinity of Hornchurch and Havering, which is connected to several English queens accused of witchcraft; that was the site of Havering Palace, which was once a dower estate of the Crown.

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ReydeAmarillo

I have extensive notes on Epping Forest in the late 16th century for CoC, back when it was still called the Forest of Waltham (if you're interested). You'll want to check older sources under that name. Boadicea and the Suicide Pool are only part of the story. However, I'm personally rather fond of locating witch-cult activity in the vicinity of Hornchurch and Havering, which is connected to several English queens accused of witchcraft; that was the site of Havering Palace, which was once a dower estate of the Crown.

Hi JeffErwin. Yes, please any research you can send would be gratefully received. I grew up in a town about seven miles north of the forest and so have a general knowledge of the area. And am just starting to research it's history, but all assistance very welcome. Thank you.

 

Also thanks for the pointer towards Havering - I wasn't aware of that.

 

I can send my email address via a PM?

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ReydeAmarillo

If you do make a conversion to Georgian times, please consider posting it here.

 

If I finally go down that path, I will do Mysterio.

 

Okay, so, taking the wikipedia article as a starting point—Rhogog is a creche of star-spawn biomass somewhere in the British Isles which seeps into local plant life. I guess you could go all Silent Spring and track the infection through the local ecosystem. I don't know enough about ancient British geology or agriculture to know if earthquakes could've revealed the creche suddenly during human history, or if that's an infection that locals would have had to manage the whole time.

 

Hi Tatterdemalion King, I (strangely) had taken that hint from the Gaslight description and was imagining blood filled roots linking up with the other trees in the forest, infecting them with it's essence and making hundreds of "children". Maybe it has been in hibernation since it's cult went into hiding, but now the cult and sacrifices are resuming it will spread out once more?

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ReydeAmarillo

I asked Scott Aniolowski about this when he first sent me that section, and he pointed out the story. Since then, all mention of the creature, story, and author seems to have disappeared from the internet.

 

There's probably a modern scenario idea in that situation somewhere...

 

I can hear a "Uh Huh Huh Huh! in the background somewhere.

 

Lets hope that all of us in this discussion don't end up like:-

 

http://tzone.the-croc.com/tzeplist/sky.html

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The_Tatterdemalion_King

If I finally go down that path, I will do Mysterio.

 

Hi Tatterdemalion King, I (strangely) had taken that hint from the Gaslight description and was imagining blood filled roots linking up with the other trees in the forest, infecting them with it's essence and making hundreds of "children". Maybe it has been in hibernation since it's cult went into hiding, but now the cult and sacrifices are resuming it will spread out once more?

 

So the question is 1. what do the cultists get out of it (vitality or immortality from ingesting the blood? Vitality for blood-fed crops or animals?) and 2. what is the mode of transmission of the ritual culture for the sacrifices?

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ReydeAmarillo

So the question is 1. what do the cultists get out of it (vitality or immortality from ingesting the blood? Vitality for blood-fed crops or animals?) and 2. what is the mode of transmission of the ritual culture for the sacrifices?

 

Since the forest was (before Roman invasion) the frontier between two waring tribes, maybe the Druids of one tribe sacrificed to Rhogog to create a sacrificial blood infected and controlled Tree "Berlin Wall" ? Maybe the current cult are descendants of those Druids keeping the faith? But yes super vitamin enhanced crops wouldn't go amiss too.

 

The few descriptions I can find talks about the victim sticking to Rhogog and being torn apart and their blood showering the entity.

 

Be very circular if the victim had been blessed with health and strength by eating the blood fed crops and now was providing the sacrifice for more crops to be enhanced by the blood?

 

Or maybe people eating poached deer are the sacrifices. Deer eat the nuts from the Rhogog infected trees, poachers catch the deer, people eat the deer, Rhogogm drains the blood, Rhogog infects the tree and so on?

 

Circle of life. Of course what Rhogog gets from it or wants is another question altogether!

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Gaffer

Might be interesting if the local villagers depended on hereditary 'wise women' to keep Rhogog at bay with some sort of alchemical powders and prayers. But then came enclosure and the sturdy yeomen were dispossessed, The last of the wise women died and Rhogog re-emerged.

 

Rhogog Gog Magog

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ReydeAmarillo

Might be interesting if the local villagers depended on hereditary 'wise women' to keep Rhogog at bay with some sort of alchemical powders and prayers. But then came enclosure and the sturdy yeomen were dispossessed, The last of the wise women died and Rhogog re-emerged.

 

Rhogog Gog Magog

Gaffer many thanks for the steer to the Enclosures Act. I note that it's impact was first really felt in the Epping Forest region around 1760, which makes very much a current event for a mid - late Georgian period setting.

 

I am still toying with/brainstorming a druidic / "wise woman" type cult with a Bronze Age lineage. However, the Enclosures Act must have serverely impacted on the ability of the poor to feed themselves and probably gave rise to much of the crime, from deer poachers to highwaymen.

 

Certainly (in this time setting) suggests a possible rational, non - Mythos cause for disappearances, ransacked farmhouses etc?

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cjearkham

I think Rhogog is an Internet hoax. I've been trying to track it down for years.

The first appearance I can find is in a Wikipedia article about it, which, thanks to Wiki's history logs, I see first appeared in September 2006, created by a user called "‎ThatOneGuy", who has no other pages or other information recorded.

It next appears, as far as I can tell, in Wiki's Cthulhu_Mythos_reference_codes_and_bibliography article, in a revision from April 2009‎ from user "Paraitus", who has no recorded info. There, the source is given as

Michael Saint-Paul (1997). "The Bearer". In Scott David Aniolowski (ed.). Sacristans of Rhogog (1st ed. ed.). Oakland, CA: Chaosium.

which is not a real Chaosium book.

Every web page I can find quotes the same piece of text Gaslight 3rd uses, sometimes a bit extended:

 

“And as the child searched among the wicker-bushes, he came upon a great tree, blacker than the deepest void in all creation. The child, trembling with primal fear, touched the bark of the tree, and found that the wood felt as if it were aflame. Terrified, he struggled to pull his hand away, but found that the branches of the tree were holding his arm fast. The child shrieked in fear and in pain as a branch began to split his stomach in two, and his childlike voice was replaced by the howls of a being of unimaginable hatred. The woods trembled. Rhogog was still not satisfied. ~ Micheal Saint-Paul, "Sacristans of Rhogog†(1991) (from a miniatures site)

 

The misspelling of "Michael" is common to many of these, suggesting they're all copying the text from somewhere.

 

If sda saw something in print which he used to create the Gaslight 3rd entry, I'd love to hear more.

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JeffErwin

This being has crept into print in Jonathan L. Howard's Johannes Cabal (p.306), so it appears to have been a successful hoax in that it now is in a print book as well as in the Gaslight rules. I find this mildly amusing. 

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sda

I think Rhogog is an Internet hoax. I've been trying to track it down for years.

 

The first appearance I can find is in a Wikipedia article about it, which, thanks to Wiki's history logs, I see first appeared in September 2006, created by a user called "‎ThatOneGuy", who has no other pages or other information recorded.

 

It next appears, as far as I can tell, in Wiki's Cthulhu_Mythos_reference_codes_and_bibliography article, in a revision from April 2009‎ from user "Paraitus", who has no recorded info. There, the source is given as

 

Michael Saint-Paul (1997). "The Bearer". In Scott David Aniolowski (ed.). Sacristans of Rhogog (1st ed. ed.). Oakland, CA: Chaosium.

 

which is not a real Chaosium book.

 

Every web page I can find quotes the same piece of text Gaslight 3rd uses, sometimes a bit extended:

 

“And as the child searched among the wicker-bushes, he came upon a great tree, blacker than the deepest void in all creation. The child, trembling with primal fear, touched the bark of the tree, and found that the wood felt as if it were aflame. Terrified, he struggled to pull his hand away, but found that the branches of the tree were holding his arm fast. The child shrieked in fear and in pain as a branch began to split his stomach in two, and his childlike voice was replaced by the howls of a being of unimaginable hatred. The woods trembled. Rhogog was still not satisfied. ~ Micheal Saint-Paul, "Sacristans of Rhogog†(1991) (from a miniatures site)

 

The misspelling of "Michael" is common to many of these, suggesting they're all copying the text from somewhere.

 

If sda saw something in print which he used to create the Gaslight 3rd entry, I'd love to hear more.

I assure you, "Sacristans of Rhogog†is a real story. I found it online when I was doing my part of Kevin Ross' updated Gaslight. I read the story, in full, and rather enjoyed it. It wasn't bad -- certainly better than a lot of what's out there. I THOUGHT that I saved it to my computer as I was hoping to include it in some future anthology, but I cannot find it now, although that was two or three computers ago, so it may have perished in file-transferral and updating/system cleaning. The mysterious part is that since that time the author seems to have removed the story from the internet, as I have searched high and low and have found no trace of it. I have also searched for the author and have found nothing (may have been a pen name?) -- there was one person by that name on a social media site, and I contacted him but never heard a word back, so it either wasn't the author in question, or if it is he apparently wishes to be left alone.

 

So while it appears to be an internet hoax or Mythos urban legend, it IS, indeed, an actual story that does -- or DID -- exist online a few years back.

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ReydeAmarillo

I assure you, "Sacristans of Rhogog†is a real story. I found it online when I was doing my part of Kevin Ross' updated Gaslight. I read the story, in full, and rather enjoyed it. It wasn't bad -- certainly better than a lot of what's out there. I THOUGHT that I saved it to my computer as I was hoping to include it in some future anthology, but I cannot find it now, although that was two or three computers ago, so it may have perished in file-transferral and updating/system cleaning. The mysterious part is that since that time the author seems to have removed the story from the internet, as I have searched high and low and have found no trace of it. I have also searched for the author and have found nothing (may have been a pen name?) -- there was one person by that name on a social media site, and I contacted him but never heard a word back, so it either wasn't the author in question, or if it is he apparently wishes to be left alone.

 

So while it appears to be an internet hoax or Mythos urban legend, it IS, indeed, an actual story that does -- or DID -- exist online a few years back.

Oh sda, so the ostiarius of Rhogog has silenced you too?

 

Am I the only one left who can tell the world the awful truth of Rhogog, the haemospawn of terrible Cthulhu?

 

Wait. I could have sworn that great old oak tree at the bottom of my garden used to be a lot further away.

 

That's odd, it seems even closer to the house now. And I could almost swear that I can see a great and baneful eye shaped in the trunk.

 

Back in a minute, I'm just going outside to take a closer look.

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ReydeAmarillo

Surely Rhogog is a "trap" god.

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trap_street

 

Given this line, abbreviated from the only "real" information we have on Rhogog - "touched the bark of the tree ................he struggled to pull his hand away, but found that the branches of the tree were holding his arm fast" - you are probably right in more ways than one!!

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cjearkham

I assure you, "Sacristans of Rhogog†is a real story.

 

Thank you so much for settling this issue once and for all!

 

Any thoughts on the spurious Chaosium book citation?

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sda

Thank you so much for settling this issue once and for all!

 

Any thoughts on the spurious Chaosium book citation?

 

No, I have no idea where the mysterious fake book came from -- I have seen it mentioned, as well, and following it up was lead to a dead end. I can't help but suspect the story author is behind it, having apparently removed the story and wanting it to remain an enigma.

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Shimmin Beg

The misspelling of "Michael" is common to many of these, suggesting they're all copying the text from somewhere.

 

It's not necessarily a misspelling, unless you've got confirmation somewhere of the correct version?  "Micheal" is also a name - I was at school with a lad called that.

 

Surprised by the complete disappearance of this story though.  Internet memory not as long as sometimes alleged...  I'm just correcting the citation on wikia.

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