Jump to content
WinstonP

The YSDC Wiki - Editors wanted

Recommended Posts

WinstonP

Yog-Sothoth.com has a Wiki page dedicated to:

 

The CthulhuWiki is an information resource relating to Jazz Age Horror and Weird Fiction writer H.P. Lovecraft and works inspired by his writings, including the Cthulhu Mythos and Lovecraftian games and media.

 

The primary focus is on the role-playing game material associate with Lovecraft and his writings (The Call of Cthulhu RPG, Trail of Cthulhu, etc.) but covers wider Lovecraftian topics as well.

 

As such a rarefied topic we rely on our members to add information to the Wiki and would greatly appreciate your help expanding the Wiki's content base. For a general introduction, consult the tutorial: http://yog-sothoth.c...p/Tutorial:Main and Help section: https://www.mediawik...i/Help:Contents

 

------------

IMPORTANT!

Due to bots and spammers, all editors must be manually added. If you are interested in creating an editor account please contact Paul of Cthulhu (@PoC) *via the Private Message system* with the topic "Yog Wiki" in the subject line.

 

Be sure to include the following information: a chosen Wiki Username, a chosen Wiki Password, and a contact email address.

------------

 

Here is some very sound advice from one of our most prolific editors @Shimmin Beg:

 

Bare-bones is better than nothing.  Even if you don't have time to write a rich, detailed analysis of a scenario, putting up the basic details will help, and can be fleshed out later.  Some sections are broadly more important than others - knowing the authors, basic premise and setting of a scenario will help people to identify that scenario they can't remember, or to decide whether it sounds suitable for their game.  Lists of handouts are nice, but less crucial.

 

Don't be over-ambitious!  I had a good streak during a quiet phase of a previous job, when I could sit around reading PDFs and reviewing/wikifying them.  It's easier to get disillusioned if you have big goals.

 

I personally find writing things in a text document, and only uploading them after a read-through, minimises the amount of editing I have to do afterwards.  It also minimises the risk of information being lost from broken connections, which is really frustrating - not that it's a specific problem of the wiki, but it can be an issue, especially if you leave an edit window open for a long time and work on it between other tasks.

 

Be particularly careful with page names.  Once you save a page with a name, you'll have no way to change it (it needs mod intervention), so typos here are really crucial.  You can create pages by clicking on a red link while logged in, but it's always possible whoever created the link made a typo, and the link text isn't always the same as what it points to.

 

I'd make a plea for looking carefully through the categories and thinking about which are best to use.  Adding all the applicable categories to begin with (which may include new ones) is generally easier than just doing a few in the first place, because there's no way to tell offhand whether a page only has four categories because it doesn't need more, or because there wasn't time to do them all.  I learned this through much experience!  If you have questions or comments about scenario categories, would you give me a prod?  I don't own them or anything, but I did create a lot of them so I have some idea of the thinking behind them, and it's always best if people agree on consistent ways to use things (/librarian).  I am also happy to talk about wiki markup.

 

I personally try to use a tag <!-- written without access to the scenario or detailed reviews --> (I hope that appears in this post...) to indicate when I wrote an entry from limited information, so that future editors will know it needs careful looking-over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yronimoswhateley

Thank you, Winston!

 

Scenario Synopses:

 

I recently bought these Halloween monographs, and can help fill out information about any of these scenarios:

 

 

 

A few of the scenarios in there may have already been described in the Wiki (I haven't taken a full inventory yet to compare to the Wiki).

 

If anyone spots anything in the list above that you want to tackle yourself, please let me know!  I'm not picky about anything on the list, and I'll be happy to let anyone who would rather work on one or more of those, do so.

 

Otherwise, I'll just start on the Halloween scenarios and flesh out their pages with basic information first (ISBN, the basic information from the copyright page, and the brief descriptions Chaosium provides for each scenario).  We can always add further detail later.

 

Also, if there's anyone who wants to volunteer to proofread anything before it gets added to the wiki, paying special attention to those hard-to-change page names, that would be fantastic.  (I bet I could post drafts of Wiki pages in a blog here for review and feedback, unless someone has a better suggestion.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Travern

Very sensible wiki advice, Shimmin Beg. I'd add from my experience on other wikis that once article names and categories have been regularized, the next important step is to link associated ones. Interconnectedness is wikis real advantages as a reference resource.

 

(And I'll sign up shortly.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PoC

Important!
 
A quick piece of extra info for those contacting me by Private Message about getting a Wiki Editor account:
 
I would need from you:

 

  • Chosen Wiki Username
  • Chosen Wiki Password
  • Contact email address

 

If you can include those pieces of information with your message it will help speed things up. :-)
 
Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WinstonP

Important!

[sNIP]

 

I've added that information to the top post as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chitin

If anyone spots anything in the list above that you want to tackle yourself, please let me know!  I'm not picky about anything on the list, and I'll be happy to let anyone who would rather work on one or more of those, do so.

 

I've got Dead Light in a text file formatted for the wiki already, just waiting for access.  After that, I'll start on any Worlds of Cthulhu scenario's yet to be done before jumping into The Book of Dark Wisdom and then Unspeakable Oath scenarios.  Work went from 85+ hours a week to 50, so I definitely need something to do now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
leonardolad

Looks like a good excuse to read through some of my books! I'll sign up soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yockenthwaite

I've already got an editor login, so will have a look to see what else I can add.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shimmin Beg

If I may, a useful but small thing people could do is to glance through existing articles in the scenario list and check whether they improve articles from their own collections.  That's particularly true of some earlier or otherwise rare scenarios, where editors may have had to rely on reviews or whatever snippets they can track down - I certainly wrote quite a few from scanty details.  It's also a good way to get some practice with using the wiki interface and wiki markup without undertaking a whole article.

 

Harking back to my original points (PS, thanks Winston!), if you own something like Trail of the Golden Spike, you could flick through it and add in any missing categories, and flesh out the References section.  If it actually all takes place in the dreamlands, or is mostly about mi-go time travellers, that's valuable info.

 

Similarly, if you happen to know that a particular scenario assumes all the investigators are experienced Mythos hunters with loads of potent spells, or the plot requires at least one player character to turn out to be an alien bodysnatcher, it's very much worth adding that information to a sparse page.  If you know of a good review that's not linked, link it.

 

If there isn't a good review, consider writing one!  I dunno about good, but I have a few reviews on my blog here for that very reason.

 

Having volunteered myself a bit, I should probably mention belatedly that my immediate priorities are moving house, starting a new job, and then trying to finish off that Gaslight scenario of mine as long promised.  However, I do check the forum every day, so please do prod me if I'm wanted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
trevlix

Just wanted to say that I love how the YS community rallies for something like this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yronimoswhateley

How much of a scenario synopsis are we looking for?

 

I've been looking over a few of the existing scenario synopses to try to get a feel for what's normal, and they vary from barely a complete sentence, to dozens of detailed paragraphs that look like the editor might have transcribed every single detail of the plot (if they didn't simply copy-and-paste the text from the adventure!)

 

Unless there's a specific standard that's wanted, and with synopsis defined primarily as "a brief summary or general survey of something", I'm inclined to aim toward something in between, erring on the side of brief when appropriate:  for most scenarios I've seen, that would seem to be one to three sentences summarizing the plot and setting in broad outlines, along with an optional sentence or two drawing attention to anything special that seems like it might require extra care and attention?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danial

Just created my first few pages (Old Acquaintance and Innsmouth category). My "To-do List" is here. It's quite ambitious, so if anyone has any cross-over with their own, let me know and I'll take them off mine :)


A few of the scenarios in there may have already been described in the Wiki (I haven't taken a full inventory yet to compare to the Wiki).

 

If you create your list on your wiki user page, the scenarios that don't exist show up in red so you can easily see which need doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
leonardolad

I'm inclined to a 1 - 4 sentences synopsis, but that's just me. As a user, I would expect a synopsis to be a brief, right-to-the-point kind of text. For an in-depth analysis I would go for a review. Of course, sometimes you will edit the page of a scenario you just finish running, and you have all the little details in your head. That's important information too and should have its space. Keeper Comments, maybe?

 

I also made a To-do list in my User page: http://www.yog-sothoth.com/wiki/index.php/User:Leonardolad

 

As usual, if anyone is already planning on giving a shot to any of these, just let me know. I'll edit these in my spare time, between job, wife and 1 year-old baby girl, so... it can take some time. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yronimoswhateley

Sounds like a good plan, Danial!

 

I agree, leonardolad - 1-4 sentences should be plenty for most short scenarios.  I would think three sentences could tell you just about everything you need to know to identify "The Haunting", for example, and decide whether you think it would work for your group ("In this classic introductory scenario, PCs are called in to investigate reports of poltergeist activity in a haunted house, only to discover [plot twist]!  After a brief research phase at the beginning, the adventure is set entirely inside the house.  The 'classic' setting is assumed, but the adventure is flexible enough to adapt to almost any time period and setting with minimal changes.")

 

I'm thinking the Keeper Comments might best be used for giving hints for choosing and using the scenario successfully ("...there are a number of typos and editing problems in 'My First Scenario' which make it hard to follow...", "...the MacGuffin mentioned on page X was apparently edited out of the scenario, plays no part in the plot, and can probably be ignored....", "...because the PCs are revealed to be cultists or mythos monsters, 'Tomato Surprise' is probably best used as a one-shot adventure...", "...this adventure is explicitly set in Ruritania, October 25-31 in 1945, and would be very difficult to adapt to other locations and eras...", "...the plot relies heavily on 'railroading' to move the PCs from scene to scene...", "...the plot of 'Jinkies, it's Mr. Jenkins!' assumes that Cthulhu was actually Old Man Jenkins in a rubber mask all along, and this change to the Mythos and the general tone may not work with all groups...", "...the adventure relies heavily on 'adult content' and may not be suitable for all groups...") 

 

These sorts of notes should definitely also appear in a good review, but I imagine a complete review might best be posted elsewhere (a Blog page, RPGNet reviews, etc.?), with Keeper Comments used mainly to collect notes about things that reduce the number of deal-breaking surprises for the Keeper to deal with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Azimuth

I'm wondering whether having a sliding-scale scoring system would be useful, ie. sandbox-vs-railroad, purist-vs-pulp, or a 'Keeper difficulty' score  that might go some way as to how 'foolproof' a scenario is, or how much prep it might require...

 

I'll have to do a bit of a stock-take on all the various scenarios I have to hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shimmin Beg

We had some discussion about this sort of thing that I would recommend reading, just to see what ideas are out there.  These tend to be slightly fluffy categories which makes it tricky.

http://www.yog-sothoth.com/topic/23121-idea-for-keyword-tagging-cthulhu-scenarios-to-help-keepers/page-2?hl=campaign+length&do=findComment&comment=255182

I never did implement Self-Contained Scenarios, and I think it’s a good idea to revisit this discussion.  My feeling is that “one-shot†gets used quite broadly and means different things to different people.

http://www.yog-sothoth.com/wiki/index.php/Category:CoC:Scenarios_by_campaign_length

 

Pulp and Purist-wise, I had a brief look at what I called “style†a while ago.

http://www.yog-sothoth.com/wiki/index.php/Category:CoC:Scenarios_by_style

I originally decided to just go with a single category where I’d allocate things that seemed distinctly pulpy.  Obviously the cut-off is arbitrary so it’s far from perfect.  One difficulty you’re always going to run into is that people will define those ideas in different ways, which is an issue both for readers and for different editors writing articles.  I’d love to see a strong model to mark this kind of thing, though, because it’s something Keepers do care about.

http://www.yog-sothoth.com/wiki/index.php/Category:CoC:Pulp_scenarios

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yronimoswhateley

I think it's certainly a good idea to give a heads-up when a scenario is distinctly Pulp or Comedy in tone.  I, for one, would want to know about that going in. 

 

Certainly, each user's threshold for what "Pulp" and "Comedy" mean is going to vary, but I think it does help to at least see "Category:Pulp" in the article, glance over the description, synopsis and keeper notes, and decide for yourself whether it sounds like it really is "too pulp" for your group (or whether it's just "Purist" enough to work for you in spite of whatever prompted someone to call it "Pulp".)  To me, a Keeper Note to clarify/justify such a categorization seems appropriate.

 

 

I'd bet that there's some disconnect on "One-Shot" because some of us might draw a distinct line between a scenario that would work for a "Monster of the Week" type formula (see TV shows like Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and Kolchek: The Nightstalker) where the same characters are in a different story each week linked only by a thin framing device and by being the same characters in the same world, and scenarios that are better suited for an an "Anthology Horror" format (see The Twilight Zone or Tales from the Darkside) where each story is completely stand-alone with its own characters and anything might happen to the characters and the world between the beginning and end of the story. 

 

There's some cross-over between the two, but I'd be more likely to apply "One-Shot" to something completely stand-alone, which by design wasn't intended to be continued very far after the scenario concludes.  (For example, those occasional scenarios where the PCs are cultists or monsters, for weird high-concept settings that might not lend themselves well to being a regular setting, for scanarios set during the End of the World, certain comedy/joke scenarios where the characters won't last long after the punchline, and that sort of thing.)  Again, it's probably something that a Keeper Note to clarify/justify such a categorization might be the best way to handle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shimmin Beg
...

I'd bet that there's some disconnect on "One-Shot" because some of us might draw a distinct line between a scenario that would work for a "Monster of the Week" type formula (see TV shows like Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea and Kolchek: The Nightstalker) where the same characters are in a different story each week linked only by a thin framing device and by being the same characters in the same world, and scenarios that are better suited for an an "Anthology Horror" format (see The Twilight Zone or Tales from the Darkside) where each story is completely stand-alone with its own characters and anything might happen to the characters and the world between the beginning and end of the story. 

...

 

That whole post (cut for length only) sums up really well what the issue is, I think.  Some Keepers make more distinction between those ideas than others, and of course non-campaign scenarios can fall anywhere on a spectrum from "you are these six pregens with important secret backstory who have to die for the scenario to work at all" via "this has a very specific hook and some major consequences for history so will be difficult to slot into ingoing play" to "this isn't specifically written to be part of a campaign".  Some are much easier to tweak for ongoing play than others, and so on.  And I for one tend to use the term quite loosely, so sometimes I'm talking about running a single-session storyline rather than whether or not it has any continuity.

 

I'm wondering whether a more useful categorisation might be to drop "One-Shot" altogether and use something like:

Campaign = this is part of a prewritten campaign and will be hard to use out of that context.

Independent = this scenario is designed to start off and wrap up independent of outside events, but isn't intrinsically designed in a way that makes it unsuitable for campaign play.

Self-Contained = this scenario is designed as a one-off experience, and is not well-suited to use in a campaign, [some reasons why that might be].

Preparatory = as before

Prologue = as before

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Meyer

I'd be happy to start with the incomplete scenarios in "Mansions of Madness".

 

 

Scenarios: The first edition consists of the scenarios Mr. Corbitt, The Plantation, The Crack'd and Crook'd Manse, The Sanitorium, Mansion of Madness (Scenario); the second edition adds one further scenario, The Old Damned House

 

 

...and "Return to Dunwich".

 

Scenarios: Return to Dunwich (Scenario), Earth, Sky, Soul (2nd Edition only)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yronimoswhateley

I'm wondering whether a more useful categorisation might be to drop "One-Shot" altogether and use something like:

Campaign = this is part of a prewritten campaign and will be hard to use out of that context.

Independent = this scenario is designed to start off and wrap up independent of outside events, but isn't intrinsically designed in a way that makes it unsuitable for campaign play.

Self-Contained = this scenario is designed as a one-off experience, and is not well-suited to use in a campaign, [some reasons why that might be].

Preparatory = as before

Prologue = as before

 

I like that - I was trying to think of a way to do that, and couldn't, and was about to say that "One-Shot" would probably be the only way to do it, but that sorts it out nicely, I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danial

I'd be happy to start with the incomplete scenarios in "Mansions of Madness".

That'd be great. I had it on my list, but it would be a while before I ever got to it :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Graham

How much of a scenario synopsis are we looking for?

 

I've been looking over a few of the existing scenario synopses to try to get a feel for what's normal, and they vary from barely a complete sentence, to dozens of detailed paragraphs that look like the editor might have transcribed every single detail of the plot (if they didn't simply copy-and-paste the text from the adventure!)

 

Unless there's a specific standard that's wanted, and with synopsis defined primarily as "a brief summary or general survey of something", I'm inclined to aim toward something in between, erring on the side of brief when appropriate:  for most scenarios I've seen, that would seem to be one to three sentences summarizing the plot and setting in broad outlines, along with an optional sentence or two drawing attention to anything special that seems like it might require extra care and attention?

 

I agree that the 'detailed synopses' should be succinct, it's why I've always balked at writing them, I've never been quite sure just what to include or how far I should go with the spoilers.

 

I'm willing to continue my push to get the details for the Magazine scenarios, where magazines have been re-issued as PDFS through RPGNow and DriveThruRPG, I'll link to the purchasing page.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Danial

This probably isn't the place to discuss it, but I'm quite surprised that such popular campaigns as Beyond the Mountains of Madness and Horror on the Orient Express don't have completed scenarios. I don't own either, but if I did I'd surely do them first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shimmin Beg

This probably isn't the place to discuss it, but I'm quite surprised that such popular campaigns as Beyond the Mountains of Madness and Horror on the Orient Express don't have completed scenarios. I don't own either, but if I did I'd surely do them first.

 

Maybe it's the complexity that puts people off?  There's so much going on that it's probably harder to be confident that you're covering everything.  Plus, things like the non-spoiler summary are going to get quite difficult.

 

I imagine there's also a psychological aspect from the sheer size of the books.  Even if you're reading one chapter at a time, you need a good grasp of the overall campaign, so you're committing a fair chunk of time and energy compared to one-off scenarios.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yronimoswhateley

I'll confess that I was also surprised at which scenarios didn't get complete (or even incomplete) entries - a lot of common and popular scenarios that have been around for decades are red links. 

 

I suppose it is as Shimmin Beg says:  the complexity of longer campaigns are daunting.  I guess that with the more common and popular scenarios, they may just be so common and popular, it's easy to assume that everyone else has taken care of them already and there's nothing new to add.

 

For those who've been on the side-lines, unsure where to get started:  It looks like looking over some of the existing scenario articles and checking them for accuracy is an easy place to start.  In many cases, they're mostly filled out already, but a review of the existing pages won't hurt.  Most of the work is already done by previous contributers and editors, but there might be a few things that escaped their attention that you can help clarify.  The occasional typo, adding links for monsters, tomes, etc., and adding categories - I believe Shimmin went through the scenarios at some point and added at least a few appropriate categories to them all, which was an incredible achievement by itself, but it had to have been a lot of work done in a short amount of time, there's surely a number of those scenarios that Shimmin never got to see first-hand, and it would be easy to miss a good category here and there, so you may find the occasional Dreamlands or Pulp scenario that haven't been added to those categories, for example.  Typo corrections, fact-checking, and categorization are a quick and easy way for beginners to get started, build experience, and help out with things that might otherwise get overlooked :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.