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Lammomedes

1920s Adventures set in South East Asia

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Taavi

You might find Bryan Thao Warra's Mythos-inspired Laotian poetry and fiction (or Laos-inspired Mythos poetry and fiction, depending) helpful.

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Lammomedes

You might find Bryan Thao Warra's Mythos-inspired Laotian poetry and fiction (or Laos-inspired Mythos poetry and fiction, depending) helpful.

 

I'll look into it. Thanks for the heads up!

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Lammomedes

 I agree that it's sort of sad there isn't something done up on SE Asia, China or Japan for the 20's, and there are only one or two scenarios dealing with Japan in the 20s at all (I'm thinking of AOC's Dream of Japan primarily, but I think there was at least one more done quite some time ago by Chaosium, though I may be misremembering that).  In a way, that's quite a pity, because in the '20s, there was still some doubt that Japan would wind up a military dictatorship, and you'd think that some series of scenarios set there could help explain that outcome in Mythos terms!  ;-)

 

 

The closest to a sourcebook for Imperial Japan in the 1920s and 1930s is the old sourcebook for WEG's version of Indian Jones. One is for sale at Noble Knight.

https://www.nobleknight.com/ProductDetail.asp_Q_ProductID_E_807818972_A_InventoryID_E_2147997731_A_ProductLineID_E_141_A_ManufacturerID_E_17_A_CategoryID_E_12_A_GenreID_E_

 

Also:

http://indianajones.wikia.com/wiki/Indiana_Jones_and_the_Rising_Sun

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jlynn

Hmm.  Thanks for the tip -- I never even knew West End had done an Indiana Jones thing.  I was aware of TSR's (because my brother gave me the game for Christmas one year), but I never followed it up either.

 

The Rising Sun book could be a useful resource!

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Lammomedes

Hmm.  Thanks for the tip -- I never even knew West End had done an Indiana Jones thing.  I was aware of TSR's (because my brother gave me the game for Christmas one year), but I never followed it up either.

 

The Rising Sun book could be a useful resource!

 

I ordered a fairly cheap used copy from Noble Knight (via Amazon) so I should know sometime in the next few weeks (LOL).

 

Anyway, I forgot there was the Japan sourcebook for the IJ game. I used to own it (it was part of their Masterbook system) and I ran a few adventures with the game back in the mid 1990s. I liked it, but it was always hard getting together a group because when people found out they weren't going to be playing Indiana Jones himself, they didn't want to play. So in every game, there was an Ohio Smith, just to make at least one of the players "happy."

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Necrothesp

"Songs of the Fantari" from Fatal Experiments takes place in a small Greek island. I think it is a "isolated locals with dark secrets" type of scenario.

 

Perhaps it could be adapted from the mediterranean to an island somewhere in the South Pacific?  

 

Actually it's an Italian island.

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jlynn

@Lammomedes:

 

Hah!  So did I -- and I was going to say the same thing; I'll let you know in a few weeks!  :-)

 

I had the same experience with TSR's Adventures of Indiana Jones -- no one wanted to be a "sidekick."  The one time I did manage to play it, I ran it more like CoC for Archaeologists -- a bunch of newbies in the field getting together and getting tossed into an "Indiana Jones" style adventure (with no Indiana Jones, or at best a cameo appearance early on to help them find a clue or something), only instead of Mythos creatures, they were after an artifact and confronted by cultists, Nazis, gangsters, a Chinese tong, and so on.  Very pulpy.  It lasted for a few sessions, but then everyone kind of wanted to get back to CoC because they enjoyed the cosmic horror theme more than the more classic pulp theme and so we launched MoN (this was in early to mid '84, and shortly thereafter I headed off to the USAF, so we only got through the NYC chapter of Masks with that group).

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jlynn

Actually it's an Italian island.

Does that matter?

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skaye

You might be able to use the Children of Madam Yi from Unspeakable Oath #22 and there may or may not be useful information on Madam Yi in Strange Aeons 2. DeBill's own fiction, which introduced Yidhra, the Black Sutra of U Pao, etc. is available at http://www.lybrary.com/the-mlandoth-myth-cycle-and-others-p-351948.html and doubtless other places.

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jlynn

That's one problem I'm having.  Again and again I find out there are highly germane bits of information out there in some magazine that I can't get a copy of for love or money.  (Yes, I missed about 20 years worth of stuff thanks to various wars and other distractions.)  I've managed to collect some of the Unspeakable Oaths, but Strange Aeons, I never even heard of until now.  *sigh*

 

But thanks for the tip, now I'll have to see if I can find a copy of the article or acquire a copy of the magazine!  ;-)

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The_Tatterdemalion_King

Actually it's an Italian island.

 

Assuming it was brought into Italy around the same time as Sicily, it's nearest other landmass (is it closer to Ustica or Palermo?) it's only been politically Italian for 60ish years by the time of the scenario. Skimming the adventure, it doesn't say how the Fantaris dealt with the Napoleonic Wars or whether they had been pulled around with Sicily or were there own thing in terms of larger European politica allegiances. The backstory of the island puts it specifically in the cultural sphere of Magna Grecia, so it may have been a Greek or Greekish island longer than it's been Italian. 

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Lammomedes

And then there is this brilliant page, which has more Yidhra stuff than I can shake a stick at. Just stumbled across it the other day when I did a search for Yidhra and Asian Mythos.

http://mdcls.blogspot.com/2013/02/the-snares-of-yidhra.html

 

Actually, that blog has some very decent playing in China hints for both 1920s and Victorian eras.

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jlynn

Sweet!  Thanks for sharing that link!

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Lammomedes

Sweet!  Thanks for sharing that link!

 

You are welcome...though admittedly, it still really doesn't help with SE Asia materials (and largely defined as Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand for the mainland provinces) and with Burma being a marginal case for inclusion in SE Asia (often linked more to South Asia as defined by the British: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan and Burma, noticeably all British colonial possessions at one point). I am not even going to get involved with maritime SE Asia, which seems even less developed as far as Cthulhu roleplaying goes: Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia, Brunei and Singapore, and assortment of smaller islands.

 

I am hoping to rectify this at some point, but I am a professional academic historian, and my specialties are not SE Asia, but I am sure I can put together something with some time and hard work.

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jlynn

You are welcome...though admittedly, it still really doesn't help with SE Asia materials (and largely defined as Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand for the mainland provinces) and with Burma being a marginal case for inclusion in SE Asia (often linked more to South Asia as defined by the British: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan and Burma, noticeably all British colonial possessions at one point). I am not even going to get involved with maritime SE Asia, which seems even less developed as far as Cthulhu roleplaying goes: Malaysia, Philippines, Indonesia, Brunei and Singapore, and assortment of smaller islands.

 

I am hoping to rectify this at some point, but I am a professional academic historian, and my specialties are not SE Asia, but I am sure I can put together something with some time and hard work.

Well, I'm an amateur academic historian (I have the degrees, but have never done anything with them, instead working in the military my entire career, and now as a consultant to the Department of the Air Force primarily), so if you want or need some help with doing anything there, I'm willing to volunteer.  Both SE Asia and maritime SE Asia have been substantially neglected over the years, and I would love to see that gap rectified, and am perfectly willing to help make it so.  Alas, my specialties in degree work, were Military and American History.  But I'm willing to learn/help, if you care for any aid.

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Lammomedes

Well, I'm an amateur academic historian (I have the degrees, but have never done anything with them, instead working in the military my entire career, and now as a consultant to the Department of the Air Force primarily), so if you want or need some help with doing anything there, I'm willing to volunteer.  Both SE Asia and maritime SE Asia have been substantially neglected over the years, and I would love to see that gap rectified, and am perfectly willing to help make it so.  Alas, my specialties in degree work, were Military and American History.  But I'm willing to learn/help, if you care for any aid.

 

I'll certainly keep that in mind. Thanks!

Oh and look at this:

 

http://pelgranepress.com/site/?p=17296

 

I'm not sure from the excerpt what Ken is going to cover about Tcho-Tcho in SE Asia, but it should be intriguing.

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jlynn

Oh and look at this:

 

http://pelgranepress.com/site/?p=17296

 

I'm not sure from the excerpt what Ken is going to cover about Tcho-Tcho in SE Asia, but it should be intriguing.

 

This ("Ken Writes About Stuff") has been on my wishlist anytime the past two years, but I just never seem to have the money for it when I think about it (or there's something else I want more right then).  I'll definitely have to see about picking up this year's volume!

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Necrothesp

Does that matter?

 

No more or less than anything else in a discussion about a game!

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Lammomedes

Why wouldn't you use snakes?

 

While that is a great link (and thanks!), I think my comment about too much Yig and snakes still holds.

But then, are Naga truly snakes? I am going to have to think that one over.

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WinstonP

While that is a great link (and thanks!), I think my comment about too much Yig and snakes still holds.

But then, are Naga truly snakes? I am going to have to think that one over.

 

You can interpret the Naga in many ways, including Yig.  Alternatives include Serpent People (as Secrets of Japan suggested), the Lloigor, or even Chthonians (though they'd have to avoid rivers!).

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jlynn

Naga Sorcerers!

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The_Tatterdemalion_King

or even Chthonians (though they'd have to avoid rivers!).

 

That would kind of disqualify them from most of the places Naga live... unless they're wearing diving suits.

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Lammomedes

Naga Sorcerers!

 

Too obvious! LOL

We can do much better...

That would kind of disqualify them from most of the places Naga live... unless they're wearing diving suits.

 

I'd love to see the diving suit made to fit a Chthonian.

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jlynn

Too obvious! LOL

We can do much better...

 

Well, in my defense, it was my initial off-the-cuff response within about 10 seconds of reading your query!  :-)

 

However, I once drove through Marfa, Texas at an appropriate time to see the "Marfa Lights" which closely resemble this phonomenon in terms of colors and sizes, though not shooting up into the air (instead, they bob around out there for many minutes at a time).  Having actually seen them, I can safely say the explanations provided in the link I provided above don't seem to hold water.  Temp differentials exist throughout the desert SW -- often more than described for Marfa, so if that were a reasonable explanation, we'd expect to see them everywhere.  Likewise, it's pretty hard to confuse the phoneomenon with on-coming car lights, when you can see the on-coming car's lights at the same time you are watching the lights, and the ghost lights continue both before and after any passing cars.  When I was there, the regional airport wasn't in use, nor was the military base extant.  Nor was there an "official viewing platform" with red lights there -- you just parked along side the road and watched them.  As a friend (a scientist) that was with me at the time said; "Well, now I can finally say I've seen something which I cannot explain!"

 

So perhaps it is a manifestation of a tiny portion of Yog-Sothoth (though it wasn't "horrifying" or "sanity shattering," just sort of spooky), or perhaps it's some kind of "defense mechanism" of the very Earth itself, protesting some long ago manifestation of Yog Sothoth!  Along the Mekong though it's even tougher to explain, since that doesn't appear to be a isolated single incident, but rather a broad-ranging activity stretching over 250 miles!  We may simply have to leave it as one of those things "man was not meant to know!"  ;-)

 

Though, as I've just begun digging into Yidhra (having bought the e-book we were shown a link to), it's possible I'll find something there that can be used to explain it.  Or maybe we'll have to fall back on Yig after all, if he's got any abilities that seem to fit.

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