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ZeroMostel

Why would you want to contact a Yithian?

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eternalchampion

Again, though, it's how use use the material that makes it scary.  A trip to the grocery store or going to sleep at night don't sound very scary as-is, either, but the only thing stopping someone from turning something even as mundane, dull, and every-day as that into a cosmic horror story is a little willing suspension of disbelief and the vision to inject something a little cosmic, and something a little horrible into the event, and tap into that frame of mind where climbing into or out of bed in a dark, quiet room really is a frightening experience....

 

You are right on that Yronimoswhateley, and I agree of course. My previous post about your take on Yithians-humans as spiritual entities not being that scary, was because although I find it interesting it sounded somewhat academic to me. One could invest on the idea, but it would need more development of course. If it is that our spirit will exist forever that would sound more of a relief than curse. And if my best choice would be to become a bug in a dying world after billions of years, I would say no, better drift among the stars.

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ZeroMostel

You are right on that Yronimoswhateley, and I agree of course. My previous post about your take on Yithians-humans as spiritual entities not being that scary, was because although I find it interesting it sounded somewhat academic to me. One could invest on the idea, but it would need more development of course. If it is that our spirit will exist forever that would sound more of a relief than curse. And if my best choice would be to become a bug in a dying world after billions of years, I would say no, better drift among the stars.

 

Jumping into a bug a billion years later on earth or maybe even jumping to a new young planet.

 

Imagine some half mad,(or totally insane, but competent) group, call them a cult for now, that has a plan for not being here when the GOO arrive. They have figured out a spell for jumping bodies and now plan on jumping forward in time (Not letting the hounds get wind of them) and transferring whole to a new race and new bodies.

 

If you had players coming across this, you could have the police rushing in just a few minutes AFTER the transference. The cult now is wide eyed and drooling, babaing in some garbled tongue that they seem to understand, but they are all horribly freaked out, staring at their hands and bodies. The ones that have not gone totally insane will still be rounded up and put en mass into the local loony bin, But maybe investigators can come visit to try and find out what happen to them.

 

Could our stalwart heroes find means of reversing the spell? Would they want to or maybe use it themselves when I new island in the pacific rises and all shipping near it goes silent?

 

I am gonna make some more magic circles for this.

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eternalchampion

Well, I am not going to be the one to disturb your circles!

 

The whole affair would call for a moral choise for the PCs. Should they escape to the unknown, or stay behind and fight a desperate situation along with everything they call "their own".

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yronimoswhateley

I forgot all about this discussion!

 

...If it is that our spirit will exist forever that would sound more of a relief than curse. And if my best choice would be to become a bug in a dying world after billions of years, I would say no, better drift among the stars.

You know, H.P. Lovecraft mentioned that it wasn't simply the emotion of fear that he was aiming for, but rather something else, for which fear was something of a shortcut:

 

My reason for writing stories is to give myself the satisfaction of visualising more clearly and detailedly and stably the vague, elusive, fragmentary impressions of wonder, beauty, and adventurous expectancy which are conveyed to me by certain sights (scenic, architectural, atmospheric, etc.), ideas, occurrences, and images encountered in art and literature. I choose weird stories because they suit my inclination best—one of my strongest and most persistent wishes being to achieve, momentarily, the illusion of some strange suspension or violation of the galling limitations of time, space, and natural law which for ever imprison us and frustrate our curiosity about the infinite cosmic spaces beyond the radius of our sight and analysis. These stories frequently emphasise the element of horror because fear is our deepest and strongest emotion, and the one which best lends itself to the creation of nature-defying illusions. Horror and the unknown or the strange are always closely connected, so that it is hard to create a convincing picture of shattered natural law or cosmic alienage or “outsideness†without laying stress on the emotion of fear. The reason why time plays a great part in so many of my tales is that this element looms up in my mind as the most profoundly dramatic and grimly terrible thing in the universe. Conflict with time seems to me the most potent and fruitful theme in all human expression.

I think that, whether you meant to or not, you captured the essence of what I think Lovecraft was talking about perfectly, regarding his conflict with time and the strange suspension or violation of its galling limitations - there's as much of Lovecraft's weird tale in your description of a choice to drift among the stars as there is in the better horror-based weird tales, and certainly in the more common horror tale. There's power in that imagery, even if it isn't horror, and I think it, too, has a place in Call of Cthulhu and mythos tales! I might imagine a Randolph Carter saying much the same thing to an offer from Nyarlathotep to learn the full secret of how Yithians gained their immortality, and whatever terrible price they pay every time they use that secret to cling a little longer to life....

 

Maybe that choice is a distinctly human one - the Yithians, as a "race", appear to have chosen differently. Why would they have made that choice? Do they know something that humans don't? What is i really like to make the human choice, and drift forever among the stars? How long can one's mind drift forever among the stars, and still remain human and sane? I wonder if the Yithians once made the human choice themselves, and, after their time falling forever through the stars, lost a little something along the way, or gained something more than human from the experience, before deciding that they will never again make that choice? The Yithians are older than we are, and have seen and learned and experienced far more than we have, and, after all that, they have decided that it is better to live as sentient vegetables on a prehistoric world filled with enemy god-monsters, or better to creep as roaches over a dying Earth, or better spending every waking hour possible in bodies that never sleep planning and scheming and conspiring over their future escapes back into life to stay always one step ahead of oblivion, than to choose the alternative of remaining human until whatever end may naturally come - what do Yithians know (or believe) about the downside of keeping our humanity when given a choice, that you or I or Randolph Carter don't know? Is the "oblivion" of death not as peaceful, restful, or comforting as humans would like to believe and imagine? If we knew what Yithians know about The End, would we really choose to remain human, after all? If we knew what was really waiting for us after death, would we, too, pay any price for the chance to sell out our humanity and cower instead inside the stolen bodies of insect horrors on a hopeless ruin of a planet, praying that The End won't come too soon for us to find our next hiding place from Death? (I think I've just made a list of things that I might want to contact a Yithian and ask about!)

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eternalchampion

I did not know that Lovecraft had this approach, thank you.

 

...what do Yithians know (or believe) about the downside of keeping our humanity when given a choice, that you or I or Randolph Carter don't know?

I do not know, maybe they despise humans considering them ignorant idiots, or maybe they see us as mere children (but… “it is easy to love folly in a child†as the wizard had said).

 

And all the other questions are also well thought, but I do not have the answers… So wish me luck, because in a few hours we will play a scenario based partly on “Denied to the Enemy†(sorry Dennis Detwiller!), set in D.R. Congo, and it involves Yithians…

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