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Travern

For a quick-and-dirty architectural resource, particularly for contemporary investigations, this database of home photos with floor plans can be sorted by numerous criteria, including style (especially Colonial and Georgian for Lovecraft Country).

 

Eplans Catalog - house plans, home plans, floor plans, garage plans

 

http://www.eplans.com/house-plans/epl/catalogsearch/advanced/

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yronimoswhateley

LOL - oh, thank you for the 1970s flashback, Graham!  I actually remember using one of those calculator beasts - I don't think I saw the exact model at a glance of that website, but I'm sure it was a Texas Instruments monstrosity of some sort.  It was in a mathematics class where I first saw and used one - the students would have all had plastic slide-rules, and every math classroom had a big stack of wire-and-wooden-beads abacuses, but we were generally expected to be able to do the math the old-fashioned way, on paper. 

 

So, it was weird when the teacher brought in a box of maybe a half-dozen of these calculators, and told us that actually using one for homework would be "cheating", but showed us how to use them anyway, because, she predicted, calculators would be everywhere eventually - it was kind of a show-and-tell day, where we spent most of the class waiting our turn to use the things.  These beasts were the size and weight of a hefty High School text book, had to be plugged into a wall outlet to run (I guess they wouldn't have run long on battery power), generated a lot of heat, and used crude green or amber LED lights for a display.  I recall they barely did the basic mathematics functions (addition, subtraction, and maybe multiplication and division), I'm sure there was no memory function or anything like that, and it was easy to confuse the poor thing (I believe the display would fill with zeros if it couldn't perform the calculation, I guess like dividing by zero.)

 

Most of us had never seen an electronic calculator before then... within a couple years, the technology had improved and become more affordable to the point that my parents splurged and got a pocket calculator with a LCD screen that ran on watch batteries, for use in calculating the family budget (every penny counted in the 1970s and 1980s!)  And, of course, none of us would have imagined that day in class that within a few years, the 1980s would bring us the calculator wristwatch, or that fancy scientific/graphing calculators (basically pocket computers, crude fore-runners of modern tablets and smart phones) would become required equipment for use in American classrooms....

 

Perhaps the old calculator site might might provide some fun details for a "Stranger Things" style 1980s Nostalgia-inspired Call of Cthulhu game, especially for younger keepers for whom the '80s were a bit before their time....

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Graham

Thanks for the complement, though 'calculator watches', my old ruler had a built in calculator...!

 

Getting back to interesting niches of history, I've just found a blog/website devoted to what happened to World War II weapons after World War II, lots of interesting & possibly useful background information.

 

https://wwiiafterwwii.wordpress.com/

 

A good example is the authors coverage of the 1979 Tanzanian-Ugandan war, where he highlights something that most Keepers might forget, even relatively poor countries have intelligence services...

 

The role of Tanzania’s and Uganda’s intelligence services has almost been completely ignored in accounts of the war. In a hypothetical pyramid of worldwide agencies, starting with the CIA and KGB, the units of the two African countries were towards the bottom but none the less, played a worldwide cat-&-mouse game for several months...

https://wwiiafterwwii.wordpress.com/2017/11/24/wwii-weapons-in-tanzania/

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jlynn

A site I found courtesy of Steve Jackson Games here in the U.S.  (Their "Illuminated Site of the Week" entry for this week.)

 

https://portalsoflondon.com/

 

It seems that London has numerous gateways to other realities in it, you see...  Lots of interesting articles mixing bits of real history with Lovecraftian/M.R. James horror elements!

 

As an example; check out this article from The Guardianhttps://amp.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/jan/08/woolwich-foot-tunnel-portals-of-london

 

The actual entry on the Portals Web Site is here:  https://portalsoflondon.com/2017/07/02/the-woolwich-anomaly/

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JeffErwin

A site I found courtesy of Steve Jackson Games here in the U.S.  (Their "Illuminated Site of the Week" entry for this week.)

 

https://portalsoflondon.com/

 

It seems that London has numerous gateways to other realities in it, you see...  Lots of interesting articles mixing bits of real history with Lovecraftian/M.R. James horror elements!

 

As an example; check out this article from The Guardianhttps://amp.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/jan/08/woolwich-foot-tunnel-portals-of-london

 

The actual entry on the Portals Web Site is here:  https://portalsoflondon.com/2017/07/02/the-woolwich-anomaly/

 

Dunsany wrote some stories on this theme. This is a note from my unpublished Elizabethan London book: "Perhaps somewhere between the Savoy and Durham House is Go-by Lane (or perhaps near Scotland Yard; there are no other likely locations, the river being monopolised by great estates), running from the Strand to the Thames, where the second-hand shop in Lord Dunsany’s ‘A Shop in Go-by Street’ (1912) and ‘The Avenger of Perdóndaris’ (also 1912) resides."

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Travern

The Theban Mapping Project: Sites in the Valley of the Kings is perfect for a "Tombhounds" campaign or any that visit Egypt such as MoN or The Fungi from Yoggoth/Day of the Beast.

 

Their exhaustive information for each site and tomb component in the Valley of the Kings includes:

  • Archaeological history and history of exploration 
  • Images, measured drawings
  • Printable Maps (PDF)
  • 3D (requires Flash)
www.thebanmappingproject.com/sites

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Graham

Nice find Traven.

 

Here is a 1912 book on interior decoration,  it's more nuts'n bolts than anything else, but it provides a baseline for 'normal' into which the 'abnormal' can be introduced.

 

A Book of Distinctive Interiors

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/56467

 

And a 1965 reprint of an 1893 report on the mines in Southern California.

 

Old Mines of Southern California.

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/56478

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Graham

A generator for creating 'Green Boxes' for Delta Green.

 

http://www.palinola.com/projects/lab/greenbox/

 

To create the Green Box just enter the number of items needed in each category (Mundane/Weird/Supernatural) and the types (Artifact/Tomes/Weapon/Misc) and click 'generate'

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Graham

The Shipbucket website which hosts a list of fictional warship names/details that I have posted to this list of resources has updated it's server resulting in all the old versions of the links becoming unusable.

 

Here are the updated links, the 1900 - 1945 & 1945 - 2020 lists are perfect for Keepers needing 'disposable' ships in scenarios, with the 1900 - 1945 list providing plenty of options for some extra firepower in the climax of Masks...

 

Notes: all ships are fictional names or real ships with fictional modifications or histories. Ships associated with a specific real class are assumed to be additional ships and listed in broadly chronological order. The specific class and detailed descriptions are determined by textual descriptions and/or visual representations. Name and pennant clashes with real ships are identified. Ships lacking any description are assumed to be of unknown design and named fictional classes are highlighted. For larger nations, real, unidentified and fictional classes are listed separately for clarity. Dates indicate the specific year when the ship is noted or the broad era the design lies within. For more details on fictional aircraft, please see Appendix I. For more details on fictional weapons, please see Appendix II. For more details on fictional electronic systems and radars, please see Appendix III.

Fictional Warships: Part 1 (1850-1899)

 

http://shipbucket.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=164196#p164196

 

Fictional Warships: Part II (1900-1945, Nations: A - Gb)

 

http://shipbucket.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=164197#p164197

 

Fictional Warships: Part II (1900-45, Nations: Gr - Y)

 

http://shipbucket.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=164198#p164198

 

Fictional Warships: Part III (1945-2020, Nations: A - I)

 

http://shipbucket.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=164846#p164846

 

Fictional Warships: Part III (1945-2020, Nations: J - U)

 

http://shipbucket.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=164863#p164863

 

Fictional Warships: Part IV & V (2025-2100/Alternate Universe & Non-State)

 

http://shipbucket.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=169113#p169113

 

Fictional Warships: Appendices I/II/III (Fictional Naval Aircraft/Weapons/Electronic Systems)

 

http://shipbucket.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=165010#p165010

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Graham

A website providing a primer for gaming set in the Pulp (1930s-40s) era.

 

http://www.fantasylibrary.com/lounge/pulpavengers.htm

 

One warning though. The html links on the page point to an old version of the page that no longer exists. I have checked the old version of the page on the Wayback machine and they are identical with the contents of the page linked.

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Graham

A very good (and well illustrated) article on the USS Wolverine and Sable, the two paddle wheeled aircraft carriers used for training on the Great Lakes during World War Two. The article also provides pretty good coverage of the two ships, the SS Seeandbee and SS Greater Buffalo both large excursion steamers that were converted as described above.

 

http://www.vintagewings.ca/VintageNews/Stories/tabid/116/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/421/The-Great-Lakes-Paddlewheeler-Aircraft-Carriers.aspx

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Graham

Something for Keepers running campaigns in New York or Los Angeles...

 

Breaking into the movies by John Emerson and Anita Loos (1921)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/56570

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Graham

A Wikipedia page detailing a tragic 1927 Air Race from Oakland, California to Honolulu, Hawaii.

 

The Dole Air Race, also known as the Dole Derby, was a tragic air race across the Pacific Ocean from northern California to the Territory of Hawaii in August 1927. Of the 15–18 airplanes entered, eleven were certified to compete but three crashed before the race, resulting in three deaths. Eight eventually participated in the race, with two crashing on takeoff and two going missing during the race. A third, forced to return for repairs, took off again to search for the missing and was itself never seen again. In all, before, during, and after the race, ten lives were lost and six airplanes were total losses. Two of the eight planes successfully landed in Hawaii.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dole_Air_Race

 

A further resource is this page covering the race from "This Day in Aviation"

 

https://www.thisdayinaviation.com/16-august-1927/

 

There is also a YouTube video that covers some of the newsreel coverage of the race.

 

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Graham

A blog post dealing with the other slave trade which went from the Steppes of Russia south to the Ottoman Empire and beyond from 1200 to 1760.

 


The horrors of the trans-Atlantic slave trade have left an ineradicable mark on history. In the course of a little more than three and a half centuries, 12.5 million prisoners â€“ at least two-thirds of them men destined for a life of labour in the fields – were shipped from holding pens along the African coast to destinations ranging from Argentina in the south all the way north to Canada. It was the largest forced migration in modern history.

 

When we think of slavery, we tend to think of this African traffic. Yet it was not the only such trade – nor was it, before 1700, even the largest. A second great market in slaves once sullied the world, this one less well-known, vastly longer-lasting, and centred on the Black Sea ports of the Crimea. It was a huge trade in its own right; in its great years, which lasted roughly from 1200 until 1760, an estimated 6.5 million prisoners were shipped off to new and often intensely miserable lives in places ranging from Italy to India.

 

 

https://mikedashhistory.com/2015/01/15/blonde-cargoes-finnish-children-in-the-slave-markets-of-medieval-crimea/

 

And from the same author an account of the stranger reaches of pulp journalism and the realization that 'fake news' is a lot older than people think.

 

Mike Dash: True Strange Stories? (Fake News & MacFadden)

 

The MacFadden mentioned above is one Bernarr MacFadden (Wikipedia) who ran a burgeoning pulp empire built on "I'm Ruined" journalism dealing with sex, sin, suffering and repentance (except in his Ghost Story magazines where the miscreant suffered, dematerialized & repented...), I'm surprised he hasn't turned up in Call of Cthulhu.

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Graham

Two books from Project Gutenberg, the first deals with Cultural Matters

 

Contemporary Composers by Daniel Gregory Mason (1918)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/56593

 

As might be expected for the period the focus is on European composers, the Boston Six (American Romantics including Amy Beach, the first female American composer to have a major orchestral work performed.) are barely mentioned and then only slightingly.

 

And now for something completely different.

 

University of Washington Engineering Bulletin No. 5: The use of Ropes and Tackle by H. J. Dana and W. A. Pearl (1922)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/56585

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Roger

This has some good Delta Green potential:  DNA technology used to sketch mother of baby found dead in Calgary dumpster

 

For one thing, the results are probably... interesting... if someone feeds someone from round Innsmouth way into it.

 

For another thing, that official "Phenotype Report" is the most game-prop-resembling real thing I've seen in a long time.

 

Anyway, enjoy.

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Graham

A maritime accident report from the UK, which as part of it's background materials covers an organization (Special Programme of Initiative, Challenge and Excitement (SPICE) UK) that could be used as a way to get a party together for the first time.

 

MAIB: Accidental Gybes by Sailing Yacht 'Roaring Meg of Cowes'

 

Main Report

 

Annexes

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Graham

Some actual World War I propaganda, covering the 'Sack of Belgium' in 1914. Note though that the events which occurred were real, the propaganda lies in the motives attributed to those who carried them out...

 

Hacking Through Belgium by Edmund Dane (1914 or 1915)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/56661

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Travern

Bibliotheca Philosophica Hermetica, a.k.a. The Ritman Library, has made their enormous collection of books, tomes, and incunabula on alchemy, anthroposophy, esotericism, gnosticism, hermetica, mysticism, occultism, etc., etc. available online.
 
Their searchable database allows browsers to explore by Author, Place of Publication, and Year (from 1400 to the present), and best of all, their spectacular digitized collection can be viewed at the Embassy of the Free Mind.

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Graham

A video tearing down a quack medical device, could be useful for Keepers wanting some ideas for 'Mythos Tech', check out the secret ingredient...

 

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HerbirdFluWest

Has this been posted yet? Just stumbled across it. A potential treasure trove.

Europeana Collections

Artworks, artefacts, books, videos, sounds, maps, etc.

 

I found a German telegram from 1917 there. Then I found out they have historical maps too. I'm only just beginning to browse through.

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Graham

Has this been posted yet? Just stumbled across it. A potential treasure trove.

Europeana Collections

Artworks, artefacts, books, videos, sounds, maps, etc.

 

I found a German telegram from 1917 there. Then I found out they have historical maps too. I'm only just beginning to browse through.

 

That looks to be a very good find. I've found something last night that looks to be a good source for pulp campaigns.

 

http://biggles.wikia.com/wiki/Biggles_Wiki

 

An entire Wiki devoted to W.E. Johns most well known character. This being a Wiki the quality of the articles varies, but there is a lot in there to see including some characters who could be re-purposed as NPCs.

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Travern

An entire Wiki devoted to W.E. Johns most well known character. This being a Wiki the quality of the articles varies, but there is a lot in there to see including some characters who could be re-purposed as NPCs.

"Biggles Flies Over the Mountains of Madness"

 

"Biggles Reads the Necronomicon"

 

"Biggles Raids Innsmouth"

 

"Biggles in R'lyeh"

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csmithadair

I recently ran across a great research resource for the US of the first part of the 20th century and earlier: travel and area guides written for the Federal Writers' Project. I was aware of the New Deal project to employ out-of-work writers, but I'd never looked directly at any of its output. The Internet Archive has a number of the guidebooks available for free use, and the one for Rhode Island's chapter on Newport was very helpful in capturing the history, topography, and feel of that city in the 1920s and 1930s.

Typing "Federal Writer's Project in the search bar on archive.org brings up guidebooks and more.

https://archive.org/search.php?query=federal%20writers%27%20project

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