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Graham

It's part of a larger series of "Highways and Byways" books covering many parts of Britain. Some are digitised at the Internet Archive (try searching for highways and byways) but others aren't. All very good books for capturing the places and time.

 

 

Thanks for the tip, here's a 1908 guide to the English southern coastline, the illustrations are minature watercolours.

 

From the North Foreland to Penzance by Clive Holland (1908) (Illustrated html version is 1.4mb in size)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48039

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Graham

A 1903 guide to painting horse drawn carts, carriages & wagons.

 

Practical Carriage and Wagon Painting by Mayton Clarence Hillick (1903) (Illustrated html version is 2.0mb in size)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48173

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Graham

The first volume of poetry by Clark Ashton Smith.....

 

The Star-Treader and other poems by Clark Ashton Smith  (1912) (Illustrated html version is 97kb in size)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/38410

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Graham

A 1937 pulp story that has been turned into a scenario for Gumshoe. Might make for a scenario for the Secrets of New Orleans.

 

Pledged to the Dead by Seabury Quinn (1937) (Illustrated html version is 232kb in size)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/32514

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Graham

Exactly what the title says:

 

America's Munitions 1917-1918 by Benedict Crowell (Illustrated html version is 12mb in size).

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48428

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jlynn

Before I do anything else, I want to say how much I'm enjoying this topic!  It's really given me some excellent sources and ideas on things, and for that I wanted to say thank you.

 

But then, I read this, and it got me to thinking:

Quote:

 

The Atom, which I ventured (to the disgust of my scientific friends) to make fun of 30 years ago, has now exploded of itself as thoroughly as a German "coal-box"; and the fixed Chemical Elements of older days have of late dissolved into protean vapours and emanations, ions and electrons, impossible to follow through their endless transformations. As to the numerous "Laws of Nature" which in the nineteenth century we were just about to establish for all eternity, it is only with the greatest difficulty that any of these can now be discovered—most of them having got secreted away into the darkness of ancient text-books: where they lead forlorn and sightless existences, like the fish in the caves of Kentucky.

 

Civilisation: Its Cause and Cure by Edward Carpenter

 

You know, this raises a very interesting point.  Considering how rapidly things have changed in the world since the 1920s (or worse, the 1890's) it's very difficult for a thoroughly modern player to recapture some of the attitudes of yesteryear.  While that's a good thing when it comes to things like racism and colonialism, it does make it very difficult for players to actually play someone from even those relatively recent times.  Take attitudes towards sex and marriage alone, and you'll see what I mean.  Thinking about things we KNEW were true as could be in the 1970's and now are completely discredited a mere 40 years later sort of brings the issue home.  And if you think about the attitude towards science in the 1890's through just prior to World War I ("it is an unmixed blessing and will solve everything for everyone") and the post Great War attitude that started making scientists more amoral or even evil (to say nothing of how the attitude towards science and scientists in general changed even more for the worse in the 1950's and 60's in the wake of the atom bomb), and you begin to understand just how hard it is for a player to immerse himself in the proper mindset.  What they saw as "normal" we see as either ignorant, or, at best, naive. 

 

Now compound the problem by trying to think like someone in the Dark Ages or Imperial Rome.  As a historian, I've actually spent some time thinking about this issue, and was forced to reach the conclusion that a medieval monk or a Roman Centurion thrust into the 20th century would undoubtedly either go almost immediately insane or would be convinced he'd died and gone straight to hell or whatever the Roman thought was the equivalent.  Conversely, any modern person sent back in time, even as recently as the 1600's, would almost certainly be burned as a witch. 

 

In short, one of the biggest problems or issues we confront as Keepers is how to establish atmosphere meaningfully when you can't actually do things the way they were really done in the 1920's.  Women, for example, are a major component of modern roleplaying, but if they were treated in classic era CoC as they really were in the 1920's, the Keeper would probably be found with his throat slit from ear to ear one day.  And who would blame her?

 

So while this is pretty off-topic (and for that, I apologize to Paul and all of you following this thread), it does seriously give one food for thought.

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The_Tatterdemalion_King

Actually witches are more likely to have been hung, which I guess goes to prove your point.

 

While a feeling of complete assurance of historical accuracy is impossible, there are places in primary or secondary sources where a sense of what it was like to see or feel the world in that time and place peeks through, like personal letters from Oxyrhynchus or the description of a volcanic island in the Historia Norwegiæ.

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jlynn

I sometimes use hyperbole to make a point. 

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Graham

Getting back on track, what is this 'baseball' of which you speak....?

 

A 'Bawl' for American Cricket by Jones Wister (Illustrated html version is 1.1mb in size)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48468

 

As a side note the first international cricket match was in the 19th C, it was US v Canada, and no I don't know who won.

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jlynn

Getting back on track, what is this 'baseball' of which you speak....?

 

A 'Bawl' for American Cricket by Jones Wister (Illustrated html version is 1.1mb in size)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48468

 

As a side note the first international cricket match was in the 19th C, it was US v Canada, and no I don't know who won.

You know, it's a funny thing, but I've never yet met an American who actually understood what Cricket is and how it's properly played, nor have I ever yet met an Englishman who could properly grasp the nuances of Baseball.  It's almost like learning one fully occupies the portion of the brain that could potentially learn the other!

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wombat1

That too--the link has the path to all manner of coolness, though of course, by the time period for classic CoC rolls around, the Lusitania is somewhat past tense as a going steam ship, I think.

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jlynn

Though if you're a Raiders of R'lyeh Kickstarter follower, collecting such information as it becomes available makes perfect sense.

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Graham

You know, it's a funny thing, but I've never yet met an American who actually understood what Cricket is and how it's properly played, nor have I ever yet met an Englishman who could properly grasp the nuances of Baseball.  It's almost like learning one fully occupies the portion of the brain that could potentially learn the other!

 

I just found out why Americans prefer Baseball to Cricket, in that first international competition, Canada won by 23....

 

But for my last cricket related item, something for the Achtung Cthulhu players out there:

 

 

The visits of sports teams to Nazi Germany in the 1930s still generate controversy today, from the Berlin Olympics' anti-Semitism to the England football team's Nazi salute in 1938. But a new book tells the story of a cricket team from Worcestershire that found itself at the centre of a now-forgotten furore.

 

In August 1937 the Gentlemen of Worcestershire cricket club arrived in Berlin to compete in three games organised by members of the Nazi hierarchy who had developed an interest in the sport.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-27139241

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Graham

A 1922 book on northern Scotland in the Viking era and before.

 

Sutherland and Caithness in Saga-Time by James Gray (Illustrated html version is 1.3mb in size)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/15856

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Graham

A blog looking into 19th Century claims that the remains of giants were found all over the US (Start from November 2014)....

 

http://www.andywhiteanthropology.com/blog

 

 

And some of the more disturbing claims related to them appearing in the 21st C....

 

 

While giant stature was the main way to identify the Nephilim in the Old Testament, most contemporary Nephilim hunters do not expect that the bloodline is still revealed by large size (as their numbers increased through time and there was more interbreeding with humans, the rationale goes, their bloodline was diluted and their size decreased).  Thus while the Nephilim of the past may be identified through the remains of “giants†(giant-sized skeletons, artifacts, architecture), today’s Nephilim may be hiding in plain sight.  They may appear human but are carrying “the Nephilim gene,â€...

 

http://www.andywhiteanthropology.com/blog/creation-corruption-and-salvation-are-giants-people-too

 

The above might just be the perfect hook for a Delta Green or Cthulhu Now game.

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Graham

Now for some formidible visitants... In the form of the archive site for a 1979-2001 magazine devoted to the works of M. R. James and other writers in his tradition, the archive contains much that could be re-purposed, including several obscure tales...

 

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~pardos/GSArchive.html#anchor9029

 

 

M. R. James at his most prachettian:

 

The Five Jars

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/24089

 

A review of the same by Paul DiFilippo from 2000

 

https://www.sfsite.com/fsf/2000/cur0001.htm

 

 

 

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Graham

Two web pages dealing with an expedition that I am surprised has not been used for a scenario, the 19th century dig that recovered thousands of ancient texts from a rubish dump:

 

http://www.papyrology.ox.ac.uk/POxy/oxyrhynchus/parsons1.html

 

http://www.papyrology.ox.ac.uk/POxy/VExhibition/exhib_welcome.html

 

Wikipeida Article on the site:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxyrhynchus

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jlynn

Pretty interesting.  Kind of makes you wonder if somewhere outside of Alexandria there is a refuse pit chock full of the scrolls from the Great Library....

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The_Tatterdemalion_King

Probably not near Alexandria. One of the reasons we have papyri from Oxyrhynchus specifically is that those rubbish dumps have been dry as a bone for two thousand years. Alexandria, on the other hand, is in a highly saline, moist, coastal environment—more comfortable for the reader, but in the long term, deadly for the text. One of the ironies of the Library is that had the building remained intact for two millennia, it would be filled with rotten scrolls. 

 

Keepers stashing hidden manuscripts in or around ancient Alexandria should probably stick them in wax-sealed urns buried in the old Gabbari necropolis (see also this book) to keep out the sea air and worse, or leave an evidentiary trail pointing to a newer, more inland storage places, like a repurposed tomb in the Valley of the Kings or further afield.

 

The Oxyrhynchus papyri themselves are pretty interesting reading, though. 

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Graham

The Oxyrhynchus papyri themselves are pretty interesting reading, though. 

 

That they are, like the Vindolanda Tablets, they offer a glimpse of things beyond the official inscriptions, such as this item from a review of the popular book on the Oxyrhynchus papyri I found shows.

 

 

One document (illustrated with an amusing photo) has a standard report to the local governor from a tax collector on one side, dated November/December AD 229, and on the other, apparently dated 8 March 243, a primitively written Greek maxim – ‘It is our habit to think the rich fortunate’ – above a doodle of a face with large and long ears.

 

The more things change...

 

Off this rather interesting topic, the latest upload to Project Gutenberg included an 1825 book on pyrotechnics, just the kind of thing to put in an old library for investigators to find...

 

A System of Pyrotechny by James Cutbush (Illustrated html version is 1mb in size.)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48539

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Graham

Two more books from Project Gutenberg.

 

The 1911 Geographical Handbook of Berkshire

 

Berkshire by H. W. Monckton (Illustrated html version is 4.5mb in size)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/48561

 

And a book on how to create illuminated initials (Just the thing for faking up a tome page.)

 

Emblematic Illumination; or Forms, Colours and Emblems by Anon. (Illustrated html version is 1.1mb in size.)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/48553/

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