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Graham

A YouTube channel that has uploaded recordings from 78rpm records and 45rpm records covering the period 1910 - 1966, obviously some of this material is covered by copyright, but the earlier material (1910s/1920s) should be use-able as background music in games.

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/MusicProf78/videos

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Graham

This is the first of a series of four videos put out by a gun enthusiasts (Usual warnings apply.) YouTube channel about the 'craft gunmaking' industry on the Pakistan/Afghanistan border which dates back to the 19th C (and probably slightly earlier.), this gives basic historical context and background. This may not directly feature in US based campaigns, but scenarios or campaigns in India may run into the products of these manufacturers.

 

 

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From a website devoted to using computers to crack the remaining un-deciphered Enigma messages from WWII is a description of the German Reservehandverfahren (trans: 'Manual Backup Procedure') evolved by the German Navy to allow for encrypted messages to be generated by hand from the Enigma working documents in the event of an Enigma machine breaking down.

 

Breaking German Navy Ciphers: Reservehandverfahren (R.H.V.) M.Dv.Nr. 929/1

 

https://enigma.hoerenberg.com/index.php?cat=Reservehandverfahren

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Graham

The report into the 1979 Whiddy Island Disaster (Wikipedia), contains much useful background for Keepers wanting to base a scenario around the 1970s oil industry. Appendix 7 contains a map of the tanker terminal complex at Whiddy Island as it existed prior to the disaster and which could be used as the basis of a scenario.

 

http://opac.oireachtas.ie/AWData/Library3/Library2/DL019795.pdf

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Graham

BBC documentary: 

 

Great find.

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Graham

A 1918 travelogue of a visit to Scandanavia.

 

The Charm of Scandinavia by Francis Edward Clark and Sydney Clark

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57106

 

As with all books of this type, I strongly recommend downloading the html version because then you get the photographs to re-use in whatever way you need.

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Graham

A book showing pictures of the Western Front, taken shortly after the end of the First World War. Contains some interesting information including the fact that Chinese workers were bought in to rehabilitate portions of the battlefield...

 

Ypres to Verdun by Alexander B. W. Kennedy (1921) (Illustrated HTML version is 7.6mb in size.)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57144

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jlynn

Actually, after China declared war on Germany on August 14th, 1917, large numbers of Chinese laborers were sent to the Western Front, where they built everything from short-run railroad links (for supply), and roads, to actual fortifications.  China declared war because they wanted a seat at the post-war bargaining table, in an effort to get German Colonial possessions in China returned to the Chinese.

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HJ

One of the myths of WW1 was that the Germans had factories to turn bodies into glue and other useful commodities, which was used by the Allies to horrify the ancestor friendly Chinese into siding with the Allies.

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Graham

A 1918 book of sketches covering the Australian part of the ANZAC forces in France.

 

Australia at War by Will Dyson

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57177

 

A biographical account of the career of a fossil hunter from 1909

 

The Life of a Fossil Hunter by Charles H. Sternberg

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57178

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Graham

First up, a pair of tourist guides. one from 1912 covering the English Lake Country...

 

Beautiful Lakeland by Ashley P. Abraham (1912) (Illustrated html version is 4.8mb in size)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57188

 

The other, from 1920 covers sights in the American and Canadian West.

 

Seeing the West by K. E. M. Dumbell (1920)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57190

 

Secondly, a copy of a training manual offered for sale to US Troops in 1917 (A little known secret of WWI is that most US Soldiers carried a British designed gun...)

 

Bayonet Training Manual (As used by the British Forces) by Anonymous (1917)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57186

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jlynn
Secondly, a copy of a training manual offered for sale to US Troops in 1917 (A little known secret of WWI is that most US Soldiers carried a British designed gun...)

 

Bayonet Training Manual (As used by the British Forces) by Anonymous (1917)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57186

 

The Springfield M1903 used by the US Army and Marines during World War I was designed and constructed by the Springfield (Illinois) Armory and entered production in 1903 (thus the "M1903")  If anything, it was based on the Mauser used by the Spanish in the Spanish-American war, and was designed to be as or more effective than that rifle was.  My grandfather carried one of these as a member of the Buckeye Division (37th Infantry Division) of the AEF during the Meuse-Argonne and Lys-Ypres Offensives.

 

Two divisions attached to the British in the Somme region used some British machine guns (Lewis, Vickers and Hotchkiss guns) while serving with the British.  Apparently this was done in order to simplify supply requirements.  Some French Hotchkiss machine guns were used by the AEF until the Browning M1917 30 caliber machine gun entered the field in mid-1918.  Additional automatic weapons support was provided by the French Chauchat (universally hated by everyone that had to use it), and the Browning Automatic Rifle (the BAR of later World War II legend).

 

The vast majority of the Artillery used by the AEF was French in design, and included 37mm, 75mm (the famous "French 75"), and 155mm pieces.  The US provided much of its own heavier artillery, including railroad guns and a US 155mm piece.  The only British piece I could find that was used by the US was the British 60 pounder, which was an excellent artillery piece and was also used (by the British) in World War II.

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Graham

The Springfield M1903 used by the US Army and Marines during World War I was designed and constructed by the Springfield (Illinois) Armory and entered production in 1903 (thus the "M1903")  If anything, it was based on the Mauser used by the Spanish in the Spanish-American war, and was designed to be as or more effective than that rifle was.  My grandfather carried one of these as a member of the Buckeye Division (37th Infantry Division) of the AEF during the Meuse-Argonne and Lys-Ypres Offensives.

 

Actually the majority of US servicemen in WWI were armed with the Enfield 1917, which was based on the British P14, which had WWI not occurred would have been the replacement for the Rifle, Short Magazine, Lee-Enfield, assuming they could have worked the bugs out of the cartridge.

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jlynn

Actually the majority of US servicemen in WWI were armed with the Enfield 1917, which was based on the British P14, which had WWI not occurred would have been the replacement for the Rifle, Short Magazine, Lee-Enfield, assuming they could have worked the bugs out of the cartridge.

 

This turns out not to be the case.  By the time of U.S. entry into World War I, 843,239 of these rifles had been produced at Springfield Armory and Rock Island Arsenal.  During the war, roughly another 1,000,000 rifles were produced out of a total production run between 1909 and 1936 of over 3,000,000 rifles.  The vast majority (if not all) of US soldiers carried the M1903 in World War I, as did my grandfather, who served in a NATIONAL GUARD unit, not a Regular Army outfit (meaning that his unit would have been one of the ones most likely to be using other weapons than the M1903, had the M1903 not been available). 

 

Of interest, the M1903 remained a top choice for sniper rifles throughout World War II, despite the arrival of the M1 Garand as the primary individual weapon, thanks to the M1903's superior accuracy and hitting power at long ranges.

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Graham

This turns out not to be the case. 

 

Thanks, I stand corrected. Now onto something from the Victorian period...

 

The Jew, The Gypsy and El Islam by Richard F. Burton

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57208

 

Being the posthumous notes on the three subjects in question by the well known explorer, put into order by W. H. Wilkins at the request of his sister and published for the edification of the interested reader. The usual warnings apply.

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jlynn

LOL, as if my comments were somehow irrelevant to the topic.  Facts are important.

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Graham
On 28/05/2018 at 01:32, jlynn said:

LOL, as if my comments were somehow irrelevant to the topic.  Facts are important.

 

Indeed they are... Here is a 1935 article on the quaint British practice of 'slip coaches', that is to say dropping coaches off the back of  non-stop trains to serve intermediate stations.

 

http://mikes.railhistory.railfan.net/r134.html

 

A video of the last slip coach operation from 1960

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NEwrjQtrKo

 

And finally a report into one of the very rare accidents involving such operations.

 

http://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk/documents/MoT_Woodford1935.pdf

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deuce

Quality stuff. Keep up the great work, Graham!

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Graham

A blog devoted to Horror fiction of the 60's/70's & 80's, the plot summaries and reviews could be good source of inspiration.

 

http://toomuchhorrorfiction.blogspot.com/

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Graham

A trio of interesting books (One in two volumes.) from the early 20th C.

 

1. The Nile in 1904 by William Willcocks (Illustrated html version is 6.5mb)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57379

 

This is a comprehensive survey of the hydrology of the Nile river system, lots of maps and tables.

 

2a. Thames Valley Villages, Volume 1 (of 2) by Charles G. Harper (1910) (Illustrated html version is 4.5mb)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57365

 

2b. Thames Valley Villages, Volume 2 (of 2) by Charles G. Harper (1910) (Illustrated html version is 3.9mb)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57366

 

Tourist type information on the region covered. Illustrations could be re-purposed by Keepers.

 

3. My Chinese Marriage by Mae M. Franking and Katherine Anne Porter (1922)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57382

 

An account of an interracial marriage. Note to readers, 'Gay' in this book means something completely different to what it does now. Other usual (For this era) warnings apply for material like this.

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Graham

An 1898 book that could be of great use for Keepers...

 

The Magic of the Horse-shoe by Robert Means Lawrence (1898)

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/57411

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