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Unfilmable

The last Lovecraft(ian) film you watched...

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yockenthwaite

Decided to push straight on with Die, Monster, Die! (1965) with Boris Karloff. Also known as Monster of Terror.

 

It felt strange having an Arkham in England not America. Though to me, anyway, it is much nicer looking than the Arkham in The Haunted Palace!

 

More paintings of ancestors looking down on things.

 

Boris Karloff is generally good, as is Suzan Farmer. Though Nick Adams much less so, and that's a big drawback.

 

But oh, it's so talky! And phenomenally laboured. I feel watching it as though there's 15 minutes at most of content here, slowly, agonisingly, padded out. I fast forwarded through quite a lot. I'm also not keen on the split action in many places, as it switches to and fro between two different things.

 

On a plus, as a sometime wheelchair user, I am in awe of all the lifts and ramps around that house. And I also like that the film shows a wheelchair user getting out of their wheelchair for a time. Something the general public can still, even today, find hard to comprehend.

 

The grill over the meteor does feel extremely reminiscent of the grill over the also green monster in the other film. I'm even wondering if the second director was influenced by the earlier film. But I do rather like the skull etc decor of the temple-like cellar. Not that I'd ever want anything like that in my own house!

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malkavian

Tonight I watched "The Monster Club". It's a horror anthology meant for younger audiences. At times the film was incredibly cheesy, but the story segments are worth a watch. Especially the last one, it involves ghouls. And they're pretty much true Lovecraftian ghouls, that must have been the inspiration. Especially the flashback scene was wonderfully done.

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yronimoswhateley

I'd never seen "The Monster Club" before, malkavian - what a fun movie, it really deserves to be better-known!  The second of the three anthology segments was kind of cute but mostly throw-away, and the wrap-around segment was worth watching just for Vincent Price, but I really thought the first story and that third one really shone, and either one was well worth the price of admission.

 

Glad you finally got to catch both of these early Lovecraft adaptations, yockenthwaite!

 

If you haven't yet seen the 1970 "Dunwich Horror" adaptation, then this might not be a bad time to check it out, right on the tail of these two movies (if you'd like a second movie to watch along with it, try the 1970 "Equinox", which features a cameo appearance from Lovecraft correspondent and fantasy author Fritz Leiber, Frank "WKRP in Cincinnati's Herb" Bonner as a villain, a bucket of Kentucky Fried Chicken, and a bunch of wonderful low-budget stop-motion animated monsters, in a movie that "Defies All Logic!")  Neither one is going to win any award or anything, and "Equinox" is basically a ''70s era home movie, but I still enjoy them both ("Equinox" on '70s and '80s television was one of the things that got me hooked on the whole Lovecraft thing as a youngster!)

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Tony Williams

Apostle ( Netflix )

 

Mixed feelings - could have been great, but is let down by bad acting from the main lead ( who wears a ridiculously deep scowl throughout nearly the whole film ); the "real" baddie is a scenery chewer and the dialogue veers from realistic to florid 17th century at a moment's notice. The violence is over-egged as well ( I'm not anti-gore but four spears running through a victim is excessive when two will do, especially when they have to survive looking like a porcupine for a minute to deliver dialogue ).

 

It also suffers from the writer, director and editor being the same person so it is overlong and could have been made more coherent by a different viewpoint intervening at some point.

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Tony Williams
On 17/08/2018 at 17:45, yronimoswhateley said:

Annihilation (2018) - Sort of a mashup of Colour Out of Space, Aliens and The Thing, about a Delta Green-style team of experts sent to investigate a phenomenon they refer to as  "the shimmer" which has descended upon a (Florida?) swamp, [...]; I had a lot of fun with it, in spite of some shaky CGI effects at the end ([...] folks who are infuriated by CGI effects should probably steer clear of this one).  Other than that, I thought it worked better than usual for this sort of film.

 

I just watched this ( free on Netflix ) and really enjoyed it. I thought the CGI at the end was decent enough. Very good acting, "nice" freakiness periodically. I wouldn't class it as a horror film so much as a "weird" film. Big thumbs up from me.

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daemonprinceofchaos

Just watched The Bay, a very good film that isn’t overtly Lovecraftian but with lots of mineable ideas. 

 

The fact the “creature” is an ancient life form was fun but the whole thing would work as a great take on Eihort. 

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Rookery

Went out and watched the remake of Suspiria this weekend (having watched the original 70s version a couple of weeks ago) and I really enjoyed it. It was relocated to postwar 1977 Berlin with Tilda Swinton - both of which I'm a sucker for. I may be a Philistine, but I preffered the remake to the original.

 

I went with someone as our Call of Cthulhu game was cancelled. Ironically, he was planning to run a Suspiria themed scenario!

 

Spoiler thoughts:

Spoiler

The atmospheric build up was very enjoyable, though it went into the reveal very early on, and a lot of it was occupied with setting up an unsettling tone, rather than jump scares.

 

Some fun body horror stuff, and good examples of a san blasted investigator trying to explain what's gone on. Someone complained that it wasn't 'scary' but I think the focus on some of the mundane aspects built tension - and it's nice to see the day-to-day administrative needs of running a sinister German Witch Cult.

 

The dancing and physicality of the actors was fantastic - I'd bet that all the extras had formal dance training, and probably the leads too. This was evident in the ballet scenes as well as the ritual climax. The ritual climax had something of the Grand Guignol to it, but I think it was appropriate and reflected what I'd consider correct for a dangerous Mythos ritual.

 

I don't know how my companion planned his Suspiria scenario - but it feels like the instinctive idea might be to think of Shub Niggurath for all female, Bechdel test passing, witches; but this was far more like a Nyarlathotep cult (possibly more appropriate for a witch cult actually) - up and including the 'power play within the coven... The Black Woman appears and decides to randomly destroy a bunch of cultists' element.  

 

The epilogue seemed a bit out of keeping with the rest of the movie and hinted at more backstory. Apparently this remake takes more from the original novel and myths, than the Argento version. I wasn't even aware there was a novel, but I'm sure that someone here will have read it.

 

Reviews seem to have been polarized so I'd be interested to hear what my fellow TSDC acolytes thought of it.

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Thanos
On 18/08/2018 at 00:06, carpocratian said:

Just out of curiosity, where did you see "The Legend of Hillbilly John"?  I have it on VHS, but I'm always surprised when other people know about it.

 

It's free on YouTube.

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TinTin

As a big Argento fan, I was surprised at how much I enjoyed Suspiria (2018). 

 

It ties in nicely with the excellent CoC campaign

Spoiler

Our Ladies of Sorrow

which is a direct homage to the Three Mothers Trilogy.

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mikey83

I just watched The Resurrected, the 1991 movie based on The Case of Charles Dexter Ward. I started watching it with low to non-existant expectations, but I was pleasantly surprised. Sure, changes were made to the plot, e.g., the doctor in the original story is a private investigator here, and Ward has a wife, and the dialogue of Curwen and other people from the 18th century was occasionally Narmy, but all in all I found it to be a decent production. And at least they actually filmed the scenes from the 18th century, with period costumes and the like. Chris Sarandon was good in his double role of Ward and Joseph Curwen, and the Lovecraftian atmosphere was there in places, especially when the private investigator, his partner and Mrs Ward go into the catacombs underneath Curwen's house, that was genuinely spooky. And at one point they come across a book, and when the P.I. opens it and looks at the pages, he asks "anyone know Latin?" Hmmm, I wonder what book that might have been hinting at...?😉

Bottom line, The Resurrected is underappreciated and needs more love.

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yronimoswhateley

1988's Cellar Dweller (complete with a short appearance from Jeffrey Combs) is, for all intents and purposes, a low-rent 1980s "Pickman's Model" with the serial numbers filed off:  an eccentric comic book illustrator, inspired by a creepy tome, begins drawing comics about a killer ghoul (AKA "the beast", "ork", or "underground werewolf"), which turn out to be a real creature, living in the artist's basement and emerging by night to kill a cast of unlikeable 1980s horror movie victims one by one in imitation of the comic book....  As long as you don't mind the other loose Lovecraft adaptations that Jeffrey Combes has appeared in from the 1980s and since (Re-Animator, From Beyond, Pulse Pounders: The Evil Clergyman, Necronomicon: Book of the Dead, Castle Freak, The Dunwich Horror, etc.), this one's fun in the same cheesy, tasteless, kitschy, low-budget 1980s horror movie spirit.

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yronimoswhateley

Netflix's Bird Box ought to fit the "Lovecraftian"/Weird horror/fantasy/sci-fi bill quite nicely for many of us:  an apocalyptic near-future survival-horror kind of thing where unexplained monsters have taken to walking the earth, driving sane people mad when seen, and served by cults of escaped lunatics who find the monsters beautiful to look at.  Think of the result as sort of like a "living dead" movie, except with Old Ones and cultists instead of "zombies", and the apocalypse survivors being forced to wear blindfolds on top of all the other challenges of surviving.

 

Certainly, the recent movie A Quiet Place covered a lot of the same territory first and I enjoyed that movie too, but I think I slightly prefer this one and its Weirder edge, and for its relatively subtle way of handling the sci-fi and horror (a tiny spoiler:  those of you who need to see the monsters in a horror movie to enjoy it completely will be disappointed, as I don't think the monsters ever actually appear on screen beyond the occasional vague shadow cast by one here or there, but I appreciated the decision to just leave them to viewers' imagination, as I feel this works far better than anything they could have done with CGI or practical effects.)

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DrMonster

The unseen or barely seen is always scarier, no matter how good the special effects.

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