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MoN - Preparing to Run

CoC 1-6e Jazz Age

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#1 Celebrim

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 09:55 PM

So I'm preparing to run MoN.  I can immediately see that more so even than the average scenario, whether this works or not relies heavily on the keeper's skill.  It's not so much an adventure as it is a setting book for a vast conspiracy, with the expectation that you'll do a lot of the heavy lifting making sure that the sandbox has toys to play with in it.

 

I have one paranoid question, and one serious question.

 

My paranoid question is this: The text says very little (at least that I can read thus far) about how much Jackson actually knows.  I realize my inexperienced players are likely to play along, but from a player perspective that used to be involved with a team of expert players, I'd immediately put a guard on Elias's hotel room and start tailing him - simply because I'd expect something is up.   This raises the unlikely possibility not addressed in the text that the adventure will not start with the death scene it assumes, or even with any of the scenarios that it imagines.  For example according to the text, if the PCs go to the hotel room early, it explicitly says that he will be out at the time.   It says nothing about paranoid investigators camping out like a bunch of private detectives for him to return, and being clever and foresightful enough to watch the back entrance which I would totally do if given the hook presented by the module.  What do you do if Jackson doesn't die?  What does he know?  And are you just supposed to metagame as a keeper so that like a cut scene in badly written video game such that Elias dies no matter what the PC's do?  Has this ever happened to anyone?  Is it addressed in the Companion?

 

My more serious question is this:  The adventure is rather odd in a lot of ways for a CoC scenario.  Rather than reading like a CoC scenario, it reads to me like a Roger Moore era James Bond movie, with the Dark Brotherhood substituting for Specter and occasionally Nyarlathotep jumping out like a boogey man and TPKing the party through SAN loss.  Or it could just as easily be an Indiana Jones pulp caper.  As I try to imagine how this game is going to play out, I come away with one of two approaches.  Either the players will turn into daring and competent supernatural commandos with lots of heavy weaponry and rack up high body counts of evil cultists with the result that the biggest obstacle in the game might turn out to be local law enforcement, or else they'll somehow convince the authorities of whatever region they are in to help out against the threat.

 

But neither scenario is particularly appealing intellectually.  For those of you that have run the full campaign before, how do you avoid the twin perils of removing player agency and turning them into mere audience for the big events of the game while NPCs with better weapons do the heavy lifting and experience the horrors and problems directly, or else relegating the Cultists to a mere secondary foe compared to the local law enforcement?  I was hoping player's might partially solve this problem for my by creating investigators with close ties to national or international law enforcement, thereby giving an excuse for me to give a cover of legitimacy to their actions while still having plenty of reasons for local law enforcement to not be cooperative.  But no such luck.


Edited by Celebrim, 30 November 2017 - 08:26 PM.



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#2 Thomas Phinney

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 10:19 PM

If you are worried about that option, it is all the more reason to run Jackson as a friendly and helpful NPC up front in one or two short scenarios (perhaps separated from each other for variety). They know him and won't be so darn suspicious... and the surprise will be all the more shocking.

 

And do buy the Companion! It has all sorts of things relating to this.



#3 Celebrim

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 11:01 PM

If you are worried about that option, it is all the more reason to run Jackson as a friendly and helpful NPC up front in one or two short scenarios (perhaps separated from each other for variety).

 

I don't really see how this is possible without separating the first batch of scenarios from the main campaign by several years.  Supposedly he's been researching his next book for some time now and having all sorts of adventures in far off places on his own.  He's not really around to be involved in any short scenarios in the months or perhaps even years leading up to the beginning of the campaign.   And if I do separate the Jackson introduction scenarios from the main campaign by a lengthy period, I'll have to provide some reason why the PC's aren't following up on those events.

 

Besides that, your answer fails to address my question.

 

What does Jackson already know?  Is there a 'What if Jackson survives?' section in the companion to help in running him if he does? 

 

Secondly, the text as written encourages the PC's to be suspicious since the text encourages you to portray Jackson as evasive, wary, and otherwise not acting like himself.  How is getting to know Jackson better prior going to cause less suspicion when he's not acting himself?  I can see it might make them care more, but not how it's going to make a wary group less wary.
 



#4 mvincent

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Posted 29 November 2017 - 11:50 PM

What do you do if Jackson doesn't die?  What does he know? 

...

the players will turn into daring and competent supernatural commandos with lots of heavy weaponry and rack up high body counts of evil cultists with the result that the biggest obstacle in the game might turn out to be local law enforcement

 

Jackson dies. Narratively, I normally just start with the players finding the body (since they can't really make any decisions before that point). I do this even when I assigned someone to play Jackson as PC, during cons. If for some reason he wasn't dead (maybe the players have access to the resurrect spell):

 

1) He's crazy.

2) Everything he might relate in his crazed state is already in the material found in his hotel room.

...

The players shouldn't have heavy weaponry. Emphasize how difficult is to obtain military grade bang (or smuggle it into countries). Shotguns are fine though (and very effective). Cultists might have those too. The real challenge are things that bullets don't affect.



#5 Tony Williams

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 12:22 AM

Just a few random thoughts:

 

As mvincent says - Jackson dies. Full stop. You are the Keeper so make him die. Any guards/tails players put on him are overwhelmed/incapacitated/killed - don't bother playing out any ambushes; just surprise the players when they go to find Jackson with the guards/tails bleeding out as well.

 

The authorities won't believe the investigators about cultists and plots to enslave the earth - that's crazy talk. They'll tell them to stop bothering them or threaten them with incarceration if they persist. Also just flash a Bloody Tongue/Bloated Woman cult tattoo on the wrist of the authority figure after the PCs have their conversion with him/her ( pretend to make them pass a "spot hidden" ). That'll make them less likely to go back if they have any sense.

 

MoN really does call for allowing dynamite or some similar explosive for the players to have any chance in certain scenes. Alternatively, research some Mythos item/spell you might allow them to "find" along the way to give them a bit of help. There are also a few helpful NPCs along the way who might be willing to supply extra "redshirts" for certain scenes.

 

There isn't much getting away from the fact that MoN, as written ( it will be interesting to compare the upcoming new edition ), is pretty lethal for investigators ( and that's ignoring Sanity loss situations ). If you don't allow them to "tool up" there's going to be a lot of rolling up new characters. If you feel you have overarmed them, then have the offending weapon malfunction or be taken/lost/broken or ramp up the threat a bit to match.

 

Several of the big fight scenes are after considerable, awkward journeys so if you feel they are overarmed just hit them with encumbrance logistics. Investigators need food/water and first aid kits as well as 20 crates of dynamite and prototype MK-47s


Edited by Tony Williams, 30 November 2017 - 12:39 AM.

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#6 Celebrim

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 12:38 AM

Jackson dies. Narratively, I normally just start with the players finding the body (since they can't really make any decisions before that point). I do this even when I assigned someone to play Jackson as PC, during cons. If for some reason he wasn't dead (maybe the players have access to the resurrect spell):

1) He's crazy
2) Everything he might relate in his crazed state is already in the material found in his hotel room.
...
The players shouldn't have heavy weaponry. Emphasize how difficult is to obtain military grade bang (or smuggle it into countries). Shotguns are fine though (and very effective). Cultists might have those too. The real challenge are things that bullets don't affect.

 
1) Ok.  But, crazy or not, he was just in communication with the PCs and otherwise able to coherently function prior to his death - book passage around the world, check in to a famous hotel in New York, etc.

2) I don't know about the gun laws of other nations, but in 1925 USA, it was crazy easy to obtain military grade "bang" as you put it.  Colt was selling Thompson submachine guns and even Browning Automatic Rifles through mail order catalogs.  Either was quite literally the state of the art in military weapons of the period.  Full sized Machine Guns are only regulated in civilian hands in 17 states, and New York - despite its very restrictive laws on concealed weapons - is not one of them.  Besides, the New York law during the period emphatically only applied in practice to Italians, Blacks and other untrusted minority groups.  It was not applied or intended to be applied to middle class Anglos, in much the same way so many Jim Crow laws were enforced to two different standards.  Something like a Lewis Gun would not be hard to obtain - they were for example used by civilian 'barn stormers' in displays of aerial marksmanship during the period.  Dynamite can be purchased from rural stores with about the same ease as a hunting license.  A box of grenades might be a bit harder to obtain - I've no evidence the US Army dumped surplus grenades on the market cheaply the way the dumped everything from rifles to aircraft - but anything less than that only takes money - which a wealthy dilettante will have in abundance.   Shotguns are not only fine, they proved so effective in WWI in the hands of US troops, that Germany tried to get them banned as a weapon of war.  An investigator with a pump action shotgun, easily slam fired, with bayonet lug and a bayonet is as well equipped as any infantry soldier in the world.

#7 chicklewis

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 01:04 AM

Let's say your players IMMEDIATELY dispatch an overwatch team to Jackson's intended hotel.

 

Doesn't seem too hard to me to have Jackson murdered just as the overwatch team shows up to protect him.  


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#8 Lisa

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 06:09 AM

Let's say your players IMMEDIATELY dispatch an overwatch team to Jackson's intended hotel.

 

Doesn't seem to hard to me to have Jackson murdered just as the overwatch team shows up to protect him.  

 

This.

 

Also, they don't know where he is until he calls them. So, they arrive just after he's killed.

 

Or, you can have him survive -- I think the Masks of Nyarlathotep Companion may cover this. It changes a lot, but I'm not sure it breaks anything, you know? If you're not sure about that, well, he can be physically or mentally crippled by his experiences.

 

As for running a previous adventure, I do recommend this. I did this with the adventure in the MoN Companion, and it did several things.

 

1. The PCs had a chance to establish relationships with each other.

2. Everyone knew Elias and had a reason to give a sh*t.

3. This was a light hearted upbeat adventure, which helps.

4. When Elias made the call, I played him as clearly frightened, and the player whose PC answered the phone had her say "What's wrong? I've never heard you sound so worried." You've paid for that if you run a previous adventure with him.



#9 Dront

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 09:25 AM

My two cents:

As written, 1) Elias dies, and 2) the PCs are supposed to get a nasty shock, right?

 

Some players may be metagaming, predicting events as soon as they hear about Elias (unless he's been planted in advance). A bit like your average flirty college girl talking a walk alone and getting attacked by your average lunatic in a hockey mask at the start of your average horror movie. Surprise, surprise. Railroading it might make it even worse, as the players may feel that they saw it coming and did their best to avert it, only to get run over by the keeper.

 

So, kill Elias off and surprise such players some other way. Elias is a bit paranoid currently, isn't he? So, he notices someone spying at him. Maybe he does not recognize the PC from a distance, maybe he does and is even more paranoid about it. Either way, he sneaks past them. This should not be too hard for him to pull off. The PCs are probably not on the lookout for that.

 

And then Elias hurries off to pay one of the PCs at visit at home instead, but that PC is currently out spying, and unfortunately the cultists were on Elias's trail. So they murder Elias at the PC's place instead. When the PCs go back home, they learn that Elias is killed and they get a nasty shock.

 

Or some other variation like that. (And yes Elias brought the matchbox.)



#10 wharfedalehome

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 01:03 PM

Celebrim - you raise legitimate concerns of (a) how do you deal with Jackson escaping death etc. and (b) heavy weaponry versus independent agencies doing all the dangerous work.

 

I won't repeat the helpful ideas already suggested...except to repeat that these issues (and quite a few others you might encounter) is covered in the Companion. I know it may seem a bit pricey (especially if you've just bought a copy of MoN) but the campaign is large and complex and if you're going to all get to the end with your sanity (insanity?) intact it's worth the extra investment. So I'd say it really is essential to get the most out of this monster. Either that or wait for the new MoN 7th Edition likely out in Spring 2018. Either way, not only will you get plenty of options dealing with the issues you raise, but lots of extra good stuff too.

 

What's not to like?



#11 mvincent

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 09:15 PM

1) Ok.  But, crazy or not, he was just in communication with the PCs and otherwise able to coherently function prior to his death - book passage around the world, check in to a famous hotel in New York, etc.

2) I don't know about the gun laws of other nations, but in 1925 USA, it was crazy easy to obtain military grade "bang" as you put it.  Colt was selling Thompson submachine guns and even Browning Automatic Rifles through mail order catalogs.  Either was quite literally the state of the art in military weapons of the period.  Full sized Machine Guns are only regulated in civilian hands in 17 states, and New York - despite its very restrictive laws on concealed weapons - is not one of them.  Besides, the New York law during the period emphatically only applied in practice to Italians, Blacks and other untrusted minority groups.  It was not applied or intended to be applied to middle class Anglos, in much the same way so many Jim Crow laws were enforced to two different standards.  Something like a Lewis Gun would not be hard to obtain - they were for example used by civilian 'barn stormers' in displays of aerial marksmanship during the period.  Dynamite can be purchased from rural stores with about the same ease as a hunting license.  A box of grenades might be a bit harder to obtain - I've no evidence the US Army dumped surplus grenades on the market cheaply the way the dumped everything from rifles to aircraft - but anything less than that only takes money - which a wealthy dilettante will have in abundance.   Shotguns are not only fine, they proved so effective in WWI in the hands of US troops, that Germany tried to get them banned as a weapon of war.  An investigator with a pump action shotgun, easily slam fired, with bayonet lug and a bayonet is as well equipped as any infantry soldier in the world.

 

1) You make fair points but it was simply a posited solution to a problem that should not exist in the first place. It's merely what I would do (i.e. give the players information they would have anyway, then find an excuse to not give them more), were I to accidentally make the mistake of allowing Jackson to live. Even though I'm a simulationist, CoC is still a horror game. Not everything *has* to make sense or be fair. Both the players and the Keeper probably need to be ok with some stonewalling in this genre.

2) If your players are that knowledgeable about US history, then I'm envious. In such a case I'd let them have some easy wins (they earned them). You can still challenge them with summoned monsters that aren't as susceptible to physical attacks, and/or cultist with the same access to heavy weapons. If anything, their use of heavy weapons may have made the game even more deadly. And they can always encounter more heavy weapon procurement difficulties after chapter one, when travelling to new countries (even if you don't feel it's realistic... they're foreigners after all).

 

But again, I've run the campaign for many different groups and never had the problems you speak of (even when they had lighting guns... and one group even had access to magical weapons and 1990's era assault rifles...).



#12 Celebrim

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 09:17 PM

Ok, so I've done some digging into the text and I've managed to discover the following.

 

1) At least according to the text, Jackson is not actually insane at the time of his death.  At the very least, this is proven by the fact that he was functional when speaking to the PC', was able to compose sensible sounding telegrams, and negotiate the rigors of travel in the days and weeks before that.  He may have been badly shaken, and he may have picked up some eccentricities, and there is certainly evidence of that, but he's not any worse off than a PC investigator would be suffering from the after effects of SAN loss.

 2) According to Brody's narrative, Brody had told Jackson everything he knows, hoping that Jackson will then expose the Dark Brotherhood to the world.  So Jackson knows what Brody knows, and then some, since he had done his own research just to find Brody.  Jackson is, according to his background, at least as stable as Brody and though perhaps suffering from his greater intelligence, shouldn't be insane simply by having interviewed Brody.  Nor from Jackson's background should he be freaked out just to have a death cult threatening him alone. 

3) According to the notes in the Shanghai chapter, Brody knows basically everything, and indeed is able to identify by name the Dark Brotherhood leadership - even those that are otherwise in cognito. 

 

So the answer to my question is basically, "According to the text, Jackson at the time of his death knew everything."

 

This explains why everyone is saying, "Jackson has to die, full stop."   Because if Jackson lives, then it's like having Brody explain to the investigators the whole campaign on the first night, which is not "the way things are supposed to happen".  What we are dealing with is the reverse version of the NPC that can't die because the NPC is crucial to the plot the GM has envisioned.  Here we have an NPC that has to die because the NPC's death is crucial to the plot the GM has envisioned.  Normally, writers would actually then begin with the discovery of the death of the NPC, but since discovery 'in media res' is more tense it's been written to assume that. 

 

Choooo choooo.   Alllll aboard.

 

Oh well, I've got a few weeks to figure out how to rewrite the New York chapter.  Making Jackson actually insane, changing the relationship he had to Brody, and/or not necessarily starting Masks with Jackson's death but making that an event that occurs some ways into the story seem like possibilities.
 

As for some of the other more artful advice (thanks Lisa and Dront), I like the idea of introducing Elias through prior adventures with him, because I like the idea of eliciting emotion from the players with the death of an NPC.  The problem is, in the case of this particular NPC, it's almost impossible to pull that off and use the scenario as written (I'm sensing a reoccurring theme here).

 

In edition to the problem that Jackson has been presumably away for several years since the publication of his last book pursuing the Dark Brotherhood, you have the problem that prior to THIS particular adventure Jackson was a hardened skeptic in every way whose entire career had been built around debunking claims of the supernatural.  So the idea that Jackson had friends with prior Cthulhu Mythos knowledge and had participated in adventures with them in some role even as just a helpful advisor in the field of Anthropology (how many scenarios have anthropology checks that require expert advise on where "Let's call Jackson, wherever the heck he is" naturally inserts itself into the scenario), and yet remained a hardened skeptic and also friend the whole time stretches credulity.  The first thing he'd say would be, "Oh yeah, well show me."  I suppose you could start a campaign with a series of "Scooby Doo" adventures that turned out to have no Mythos component, and have the PC's pull the mask off of Cthulhu and discover it was actually the Janitor from scene two, but a) that sounds about as fun as a root canal, and B) that involves creating said series of adventures since most CoC published works don't work that way (probably for good reason).

 

I do find it interesting how much effort was expended on debunking a scenario I consider rather unlikely anyway, compared to what I think is the much bigger challenge with running the scenario(s) as written. 

UPDATE: Actually, there may be an elegant solution to the problem of the PC's pulling a stake out and trying to protect Jackson.  If the actually do this, and pull it off successfully, all you'd need to do was logically escalate within the framework provided by the scenario.   If the team of assassins fail, then the local sorcerer can initiate a standby 'Plan B', which involves summoning something like a hunting horror or the like to finish the job (and then fly off into the night).   While the PC's might reasonably have the ability to thwart the assassins, and might reasonably have the ability to protect themselves from an hunting horror, at this early point in their careers they probably don't have the ability to actually stop the death of an NPC by an alien horror.  The resulting scene actually plays well, with the PC's not feeling railroaded, and doesn't involve the GM's relying on his godlike powers of narrative control and thereby undermining the entire game.  You have time to talk with the PCs for a short while, with Jackson thanking the PC's for intervening, making small talk, everyone relaxes their guard, the police show up, Jackson has a chance to begin to explain what he's been doing and what is going on, but then just as he's starting to spill the really interesting details, a hunting horror smashes through the window or whatever, and coils about Jackson.  And if they can stop THAT, then they've earned the win and I'm OK with that.


Edited by Celebrim, 01 December 2017 - 05:09 AM.


#13 Dront

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 10:05 AM

Great that you found a way to exert your creative powers that works for you! :-D



#14 gabrielconnor

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 12:06 PM

Begin in media res, with the investigators outside his hotel door with Elias already dead inside. "Problem" solved.



#15 Celebrim

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 02:53 PM

And with some more thought, I think I know how to introduce Jackson prior to his death, if only in a small way.  If Jackson has actually written a book pertinent to campaign, rather than a bunch of books regarding things that the PC's are highly unlikely to care about if the game begins in New York (and with the possible exception of Witch Cults of England, none of Jackson's books are pertinent to MoN either), then Jackson's work could turn up in the PC's research and I could at least mention that a PC owns a signed copy of the work because the author is a former roommate, drinking buddy, or whatever.

 

That still doesn't deal with the fact that Jackson has been basically been away for the last 1-3 years doing the research for his next book, or that Jackson as written is an extremely unlikely investigator asset because he's overseas most of the time, knows nothing about the mythos, and can't end up dead, insane, or knowledgeable prior to the beginning of MoN

 

Can anyone think of a fun adventure, set in New England in roughly 1923, that requires the advice of an expert Anthropologist at some point, but wouldn't actually rope someone as impetuous and adventurous as Jackson into the investigation?



#16 jlynn

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 10:01 AM

I see no one's answered this, and I suspect I recognize why.  It's because, really, the answers to every single question you posited here are in the Companion, and it's exhausting to retype the content there into these little comment blocks (besides probably being illegal under British Copyright Law ;-) ).

 

Fundamentally, the answers to your questions in re Jackson Elias, his death, and introducing him early are addressed at great length in the Companion, and the intro scenario is intended to be run as a "space filler" in some other campaign or short scenario series simply so that you can familiarize characters with him prior to killing him off.  By all means, you should do the short scenario weeks or even months before you actually start MoN, if at all possible.  ...Which is designed to overcome the deeper issue of the entire Jackson Elias conundrum in terms of MoN -- which is "why do the players give a flying hoot about some guy they never actually meet or see in the first place?" -- in effect Jackson Elias is just the typical; "your long-lost uncle leaves you a house...a haunted house" shibboleth from the early days of CoC.  In D&D terms it's the equivalent of "you all meet in an inn...".  In other words, the purpose of the intro scenario is sort of a metagaming purpose:  to give your players a more emotional/visceral connection to Jackson, as opposed to merely finding the dead body (horrific enough admittedly, but, as written, not really a cause of emotional investment in bringing his slayers to justice).

 

The companion also addresses many of your other tactical questions.  And does a much better and more thorough job of it than any of us are likely to do here.  Really, I cannot recommend strongly enough buying the PDF from Chaosium -- it's well worth the investment; and, according to Chaosium, will remain useful, even with the new edition due out early next year.

 

As far as all of this goes, I've run at least the New York scenario several times, and I've never been confronted by any of the problems you foresee.  I don't think my groups were incompetent (indeed, at least two of the members knew the firearms laws in America in the 1920's as well or better than I did), but they never did any of the things you foresee happening in this case.  For one thing -- there really isn't time to put a tail on Jackson; he calls you for a meet, and it's not set for six months later or anything.  Likewise, none of them ran around NYC equipped like Navy SEALS either -- they tried to "blend," and even though almost all of them carried some kind of heat, it didn't include machineguns and flamethrowers, but maybe a revolver or even an M1911 or two.  Similarly, when they get overseas, especially in a colonial jurisdiction, they'll find the local authorities (who were always worried about "native uprisings") to be remarkably unfriendly towards such things -- an elephant gun in Nairobi makes perfect sense; a machine gun, or even a tommygun just seems somehow "unsporting" to your average British Colonial officer, even if you do claim you plan to use it to hunt...and bringing in a ton of dynamite and several thousand rounds of ammunition will almost certainly get you clapped up in the local hoosegow until the Colonial office can get a telegram or two from America explaining just what it is you want to do with all of that out there in the restive Empire.  Which rather puts a crimp in any plans to be at a certain mountain at a certain time.

 

In short, most of the problems you highlight are pretty easily defused; even without the guidance from the Companion, and the Companion gives you lots of ideas at every step of the way for what to do if something goes "wrong" in the scenario because your players operated outside the assumed norm of the campaign.

 

So, what's my bottom line?  Buy the Companion, or borrow someone's copy, or something; I frankly don't know how I got along without it all those years ago when I first started running the campaign.  (What was it?  '83, '84?  Something like that.)

 

Responding to your final question -- while I can't think of any specific scenarios off hand that exactly meet your specifications, there are literally thousands of pages of scenarios set in Lovecraft Country out there, and I can't imagine that not one of them would work for this purpose.  If I get some time, I'll do some looking through all my LC books and see if there's one that would be a standout.

 

Hopefully you'll find something useful in all of the above, and good luck on your campaign!


Edited by jlynn, 07 December 2017 - 10:09 AM.


#17 Harndon

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Posted Yesterday, 01:08 AM

Jackson dies. Narratively, I normally just start with the players finding the body (since they can't really make any decisions before that point). I do this even when I assigned someone to play Jackson as PC, during cons. If for some reason he wasn't dead (maybe the players have access to the resurrect spell):


I agree. I think that the campaign beginning with a certain thing is hardly railroading - Elias is a MacGuffin. He's there to die horribly and give the PCs a reason to start investigating. Nothing wrong with saying "you all coincidentally arrive at the same time at the hotel you are to meet your old friend, who has been acting so odd" unless the PCs themselves are the sorts of people who would say "aha, something must be up, let's show up the day prior with guns."

The authorities won't believe the investigators about cultists and plots to enslave the earth - that's crazy talk. They'll tell them to stop bothering them or threaten them with incarceration if they persist. Also just flash a Bloody Tongue/Bloated Woman cult tattoo on the wrist of the authority figure after the PCs have their conversion with him/her ( pretend to make them pass a "spot hidden" ). That'll make them less likely to go back if they have any sense.


Be warned - your players might decide that Sergeant So-and-So must be an important enemy and will devote a session to dealing with him. I know mine would.





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