Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

PCs as spell casters


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#21 Lisa

Lisa

    Breakfast Clubber

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 916 posts

Posted 23 November 2017 - 07:22 AM

It can be a great campaign, but you need to have enough grasp of it to know what the weaknesses are and how you can compensate.

 

One of these weaknesses is indeed what Nyarlathotep's role in it is. This is a being who could crush the PCs -- but won't. Why? Or won't unless the GM decides to have this happen. Okay, but most of us would like some guidelines for when it's legit to do this. And it's a being who couldn't get out of a pyramid for millennia, but COULD transport his priestess halfway around the world and insert the entire knowledge of Western civilization into her mind and pick exactly the right idiots to break the trap.

 

The best solution here is usually some combination of "when the stars are right" (for why N chose to break out then) and focusing on the human cultists. Use Nyarlathotep sparingly, and focus on the individual cultists. Why are they cultists? What do they want? What do they think they're going to get from their actions?

 

(From that point of view, well, I figure Nyarlathotep is using the PCs to clear away the chaff among the cultists. The big plan isn't necessarily Nyarlathotep's -- if it gets foiled, there's always next conjunction. But at this point, I'm getting off topic.)

 

For the human cultists, what spells do they need and why? Do they have them in books, on scrolls, or merely in their memory? Forget what the book says they have. What spells do their stats say they know? Get rid of any that don't make sense. Add any you think they really should have. These are what will be in any books they have.

 

Are these books holy writings of the cult? This seems most plausible in many cases. Does one NPC have a single, closely guarded more general Tome? Go with that.

 

This also applies to items. The British cult has some items that the PCs could, theoretically, get their hands on. If you don't want them using these items, don't have a user's guide to them. Otherwise, a diary or a sheet of paper folded into the box with the items will do the trick.




Log in to remove this video.

#22 AlexanderCorvaine

AlexanderCorvaine

    Neophyte

  • Patron
  • 6 posts
  • LocationDayton, Ohio

Posted 14 December 2017 - 07:42 PM

As I inquired above:

How do you determine whether a casting attempt succeeds or fails?


Usually its an opposed Pow roll or a simple Pow Check in 7th.

#23 Gaffer

Gaffer

    Lesser Independent

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,424 posts
  • LocationOrlando FL USA

Posted 14 December 2017 - 08:41 PM

A casting roll is required when a character attempts to cast a newly learned spell for the first time. Once a spell has been successfully cast (even if a pushed roll was required to do so), subsequent uses do not require a casting roll; non-player characters and monsters do not need to make casting rolls.

A Hard POW roll is required to successfully cast a spell the first time.

Usually its an opposed Pow roll or a simple Pow Check in 7th.


Based on the above from the 7e rules, I'm not sure an opposed POW roll means the casting attempt fails, so much as that the target resists the effect. Can you point me to a spell in the Grimoire that requires a POW check?
"Two in the head, you know he's dead." <heh-heh>

#24 DAR

DAR

    Knight of the Outer Void

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 364 posts
  • LocationChicagoland

Posted 14 December 2017 - 08:56 PM

I've run with PC sorcerers pretty regularly - my methodology for reducing Sanity loss is to require investment in other skills as a buffer, with Cthulhu Mythos being the ultimate (somewhat counter productive) example. So every 10 full points of Cthulhu Mythos reduces the San cost of spells by 1 point, I think Occult was 20 for per point reduction and Meditation was 30 (this actually applies to all Sanity loss in my games). It's arguably very pulpy (I'm fine with that), but it hasn't stopped any player yet from going crazy or dying if they are that determined to do things that would result in it...

 

D.



#25 rimren

rimren

    Neophyte

  • Member
  • 8 posts

Posted 14 December 2017 - 10:48 PM

I've run with PC sorcerers pretty regularly - my methodology for reducing Sanity loss is to require investment in other skills as a buffer, with Cthulhu Mythos being the ultimate (somewhat counter productive) example. So every 10 full points of Cthulhu Mythos reduces the San cost of spells by 1 point, I think Occult was 20 for per point reduction and Meditation was 30 (this actually applies to all Sanity loss in my games). It's arguably very pulpy (I'm fine with that), but it hasn't stopped any player yet from going crazy or dying if they are that determined to do things that would result in it...

 

D.

 

Good house rules. Anything that makes Mythos skill a boon rather than hinderance is a good thing. Mythos Hardened optional rule is a good thing to use too. Magic should be hard to come by, but once they have it PCs shouldn't be restricted from using it. It's also thematically appropriate to model SAN loss from magic as a growing obsession with magical power -- the more the sorcerer comes to rely on it, the more he's obsessed with seeking out new spells and artifacts.



#26 DAR

DAR

    Knight of the Outer Void

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 364 posts
  • LocationChicagoland

Posted 15 December 2017 - 05:28 PM

Good house rules. Anything that makes Mythos skill a boon rather than hinderance is a good thing. Mythos Hardened optional rule is a good thing to use too. Magic should be hard to come by, but once they have it PCs shouldn't be restricted from using it. It's also thematically appropriate to model SAN loss from magic as a growing obsession with magical power -- the more the sorcerer comes to rely on it, the more he's obsessed with seeking out new spells and artifacts.

 

Yeah, that was my intent. It has worked out very well in play, and even after I've added in Mythos Hardening and the Pulp Talents it merely delays the insanity and death if that is where I or the players are intent on going. Currently I have one player who seems pretty immune to minor San losses due to a combination of effects - but the moment she runs into something big she's basically as toast as everyone else.  It should actually provide an "illuminating" example for everyone about how San-wrecking the thing is simply because she's been able to shrug off all of the little stuff they've had thrown at them.

 

What my house rules provide is somewhat of a sense of false security - and I am totally ok with that. It seems very "Lovecraftian sorcerer" to me.

 

D.