Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Relevance of mythos experiences

CoC 7e CoC 1-6e

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Galbraith

Galbraith

    Breakfast Clubber

  • Patron
  • PipPipPip
  • 121 posts
  • LocationBoston, MA

Posted 03 October 2017 - 06:58 PM

In many scenarios, successful Cthulhu Mythos rolls are rewarded with a specific name-drop or identification of a mythos beastie or item. These to me have often seemed immersion-breaking, because they act as if some CM gained by being attacked by Mi-Go will suddenly grant you insights about the Great Race of Yith. Sometimes I've heard that this is justified by insane insights into the greater nature of the world, but that seems a little unsatisfying, and presumptive of a great deal of interconnectedness. How do you use CM in your games? Do you let rolls give players only information connected to their previous experiences? Do you paraphrase to avoid name-drops? Or do you see it as part of the game?


Log in to remove this video.

#2 GBSteve

GBSteve

    Breakfast Clubber

  • Super Moderator
  • 4,093 posts

Posted 03 October 2017 - 07:06 PM

I take it to include the wider experience of the Mythos, some of it revelatory in the religious sense but also I might suggest that, for example, reading about Cthulhu in the Necronomicon the character remembers seeing a footnote about the Mi-go and their mining habits.

 

Regarding names, I tend to almost not use them at all. I'll use metaphor for the main part or description. I also change the Mythos to make it unfamiliar, and hence more scary. After all, that was HPL's plan. And if I do mention a name, the thing it represents is almost certainly not what anyone read in the Monster Manual.


Come read about Dreamhounds of Paris actually being played.
 
The Armitage Files, now with added Ennie Award.
Cthulhu Britannica: London Box Set, now with Golden Geek runner-up award.

#3 Gaffer

Gaffer

    Lesser Independent

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,423 posts
  • LocationOrlando FL USA

Posted 04 October 2017 - 01:25 PM

I use it to expand understanding, rather than specific information.


"Two in the head, you know he's dead." <heh-heh>

#4 Galbraith

Galbraith

    Breakfast Clubber

  • Patron
  • PipPipPip
  • 121 posts
  • LocationBoston, MA

Posted 04 October 2017 - 01:31 PM

I take it to include the wider experience of the Mythos, some of it revelatory in the religious sense but also I might suggest that, for example, reading about Cthulhu in the Necronomicon the character remembers seeing a footnote about the Mi-go and their mining habits.

Regarding names, I tend to almost not use them at all. I'll use metaphor for the main part or description. I also change the Mythos to make it unfamiliar, and hence more scary. After all, that was HPL's plan. And if I do mention a name, the thing it represents is almost certainly not what anyone read in the Monster Manual.


The name thing is something I've already been using heavily, but the footnote thing is something I'd not thought about. That's an elegant way to work in more specific info without straining the suspension of disbelief.

#5 eternalchampion

eternalchampion

    Knight of the Outer Void

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 416 posts
  • Locationsouth of Kadath

Posted 04 October 2017 - 02:06 PM

I would agree with GBSteve and Gaffer. It is a measure of your understanding of the “reality” and in this reality, yes, there is a kind of interconnectedness. As in the esoteric teaching of many cultures, the spiritual ascension leads to enlightenment and the understanding that All are One, venturing in to the Mythos might grand someone the negative aspect of enlightenment. So, as one learns more he/she begins to understand phenomena and events in a different light, like connecting some dots that didn’t seem related before.

All that happen in the mind and soul of the character. For me the roll represents the possibility the character can understand something useful out of it, for a specific situation in a scenario.



#6 yronimoswhateley

yronimoswhateley

    Lesser Servitor

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,164 posts
  • LocationDunwich, Maryland

Posted 04 October 2017 - 08:05 PM

I also agree with the above.

 

I think that, in-game, it's meant to model those moments in the Lovecraft stories where the narrator sees something weird, and then thinks it reminds him of something he read in a Poe story, or saw in a painting by Dore or Roerich or Simes, or saw mentioned in an eccentric's lecture on archaeology/mythology/astronomy/physics/whatever, or read in a mysterious and puzzling line of the Necronomicon...

 

In Lovecraft's usage, it's primarily for atmosphere.

 

In game terms, it can also help out a little bit with providing important clues for solving the mystery or defeating a monster or getting out of a mess in one piece or whatever.

 

But, in-game, I think it's still best used with atmosphere in mind - a nugget of useful information in a creepy and weird wrapper....


"I would have written a shorter letter, but I did not have the time." - Blaise Pascal






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: CoC 7e, CoC 1-6e