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1920s Adventures set in South East Asia

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#21 Lammomedes

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Posted 11 March 2015 - 09:07 PM

Lammomedes, one thing that MIGHT be helpful to you, is the Trail of Cthulhu source book Mythos Expeditions.  While it has rules for how to conduct expeditions (which frankly seem a bit "clunky" to me; I'm kind of surprised actually since normally Ken Hite does a pretty good job of keeping the rules smooth), it also discusses quite a few out of the way places -- including Papua-New Guinea.  While that's off the beaten path you're looking for it might help somewhat with the SE Asia style of jungle (which does differ from it's African and South American counterparts).  Finally, I did find a brief discussion of the Khmer Empire, Angkor Wat, Angkor Thom and some discussion of travel in the Cambodian jungle in GURPS Classic: Places of Mystery (pp 58-9).  I'll keep looking, but it's looking unlikely right now.

 

Thanks Jlynn! I'll take a look through Mythos Expeditions which I picked up when it came out, glanced through, and then sort of set aside to get through again when I had time. I had similar thoughts as you do about the "clunkiness" of that particular supplement, but I'll take a closer look this weekend. At the time it came out my group was playing something else...




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#22 Lammomedes

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Posted 11 March 2015 - 09:12 PM

There are some excellent images out there...and perhaps my players are going to find themselves dragged off to Angkor Wat to track down the Tcho-Tcho conspiracy.

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • AfficheAngkorGroslier.jpg

Edited by Lammomedes, 11 March 2015 - 09:13 PM.


#23 Gaffer

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Posted 11 March 2015 - 09:37 PM

There was even an RAFM miniatures set "M.U. Expedition up the Mekong".

 

http://thumbs2.ebays...5oKpICFk8kg.jpg

m2FDw9y_9GnE5oKpICFk8kg.jpg


Edited by Gaffer, 11 March 2015 - 09:38 PM.

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#24 wombat1

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Posted 11 March 2015 - 09:55 PM

There was even an RAFM miniatures set "M.U. Expedition up the Mekong".

 

 

m2FDw9y_9GnE5oKpICFk8kg.jpg

It is listed as still available on the RAFM site.

http://www.rafm.com/...egory_Code=COCM



#25 The_Tatterdemalion_King

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 02:40 AM

I'm thinking the "anglo-centric" explanation doesn't really fly, considering the number of scenarios and even a source book set in Central and South America.  While one of those scenarios was set in a British colony (British Honduras -- modern Belize), the rest have been set in places like Mexico, Peru, Paraguay and Brazil.


I said English and American colonial interests, which absolutely does involve Central and South America.

EDIT: To clarify my point, it has nothing to do with what languages Egyptians or Cubans or Maya speak, but how much English-speakers care about and make media about Egypt or Cuba or the Yucatan.

Edited by The_Tatterdemalion_King, 12 March 2015 - 02:57 AM.

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#26 jlynn

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 06:26 AM

I said English and American colonial interests, which absolutely does involve Central and South America.

EDIT: To clarify my point, it has nothing to do with what languages Egyptians or Cubans or Maya speak, but how much English-speakers care about and make media about Egypt or Cuba or the Yucatan.

Last time I checked, the US didn't actually own any colonies in Central and South America.  Financial interests, certainly, and the occasional military intervention in support of those financial interests, but no actual colonies.  In fact, the only turf the US owned at the time was Puerto Rico and the Canal Zone.

 

Mind you, if you can show me where these US colonies in Peru, Brazil, Paraguay, and even Mexico were, I'll cheerfully admit you were spot on all along.

 

And, had you actually read my answer, you might have noted the following quote:  "One possible explanation is that there just isn't a lot of popular writing or movie making on the SE Asia area these days (other than the occasional Vietnam War pic), so people tend not to automatically think of the jungles of Burma or Thailand or Indochina as Places of Mystery.  If you go back and dig into the stuff being written back in the 1890s-1920's there WAS some good stuff (the Dacoits, if I recall correctly, were primarily in Burma and parts of modern Bangladesh and were one of the groups used by Fu Manchu as assassins), but as World War II got closer the focus tended to shift away from there and out into the Pacific basin or China more."

 

That actually sounds like I was agreeing with you.  Hmmm.

 

(Edited to add:  I very carefully used the term "Anglo-centric" since that's used in most scholarly circles to refer to both British and American influences.)


There was even an RAFM miniatures set "M.U. Expedition up the Mekong".

 

http://thumbs2.ebays...5oKpICFk8kg.jpg

m2FDw9y_9GnE5oKpICFk8kg.jpg

Man!  I'd completely forgotten about that!  What a blast from the past!  ;-)  Thanks for sharing that thumbnail.  It's a pity no one ever (seemingly) wrote anything for the miniatures to be used with!


Edited by jlynn, 12 March 2015 - 06:27 AM.


#27 The_Tatterdemalion_King

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 07:13 AM

Given your razor-narrow definition of colonialism, I'm going to assume you aren't Canadian...
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#28 Gaffer

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 01:20 PM

The USA also had a protectorate over the Philippines until after WWII.


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#29 rylehNC

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 02:28 PM

The US had Marines all over the Caribbean basin during this time, and administered some of the Dominican Republic's bureaucracy. So while there may not have been colonies under the strictest definition of the term, US imperialism was alive and well.

 

Last time I checked, the US didn't actually own any colonies in Central and South America.  Financial interests, certainly, and the occasional military intervention in support of those financial interests, but no actual colonies.  In fact, the only turf the US owned at the time was Puerto Rico and the Canal Zone.

 

Mind you, if you can show me where these US colonies in Peru, Brazil, Paraguay, and even Mexico were, I'll cheerfully admit you were spot on all along.


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#30 jlynn

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 03:15 PM

Given your razor-narrow definition of colonialism, I'm going to assume you aren't Canadian...

You simply don't read answers do you?


The USA also had a protectorate over the Philippines until after WWII.

Which isn't precisely in Central or South America is it?


The US had Marines all over the Caribbean basin during this time, and administered some of the Dominican Republic's bureaucracy. So while there may not have been colonies under the strictest definition of the term, US imperialism was alive and well.

As I stated in the very sentence you quoted.  Nor did I deny the USA was an imperialist power during this time. 

 

*sigh* 



#31 WinstonP

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 03:41 PM

We are wandering away from a search for 1920s scenario of use for Southeast Asia.
 
Let us return to that topic.



#32 WinstonP

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 03:47 PM

I did write a very short scenario for the in-development-hell "Cthulhu by ARCLIGHT" that could be pretty easily adjusted to the 20s Indochina:

 

http://www.theblacks...h-a-zulu-event/


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#33 jlynn

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 04:32 PM

We are wandering away from a search for 1920s scenario of use for Southeast Asia.
 
Let us return to that topic.

We are indeed. 

 

Lammomedes, I have had no luck in finding anything set in SE Asia during the 1920s.  At least for Call of Cthulhu or Trail of Cthulhu (though I will admit my "Trail" library isn't nearly as complete as my CoC library is, so someone else may come up with something suitable from that source).  As you know, I came up with a couple of pulp mystery scenarios set in the general region, but nothing that gets you to where the Tcho-Tcho hang out.

 

I'm wondering if the scenario from "Mysteries of the Congo" couldn't be jiggered around with a bit to make it come out up along the Mekong instead.  Obviously the native villages would require some cosmetic re-working, but the "bad natives" could easily become Tcho-Tchos, and the climactic scene could be set in an ancient temple of the Angkor Wat variety.  Again, I'll refer you to GURPS Places of Mystery for maps of the temple as well as some discussion about the type of stonework done in it. 

 

Structurally, I'm thinking one journey up a jungle river would be pretty much like another, with suitable cosmetic changes (vegetation types, animal types, natives, that sort of thing) to get folks into the spirit of the thing.  I'll also point out that "Mother of Malaria" from Mythos Expeditions might have some good ideas on encounters and the like to use (though again, you'd have to replace African animal encounters with Asian ones -- the "good" news is that tigers and giant snakes and crocodiles abound in the area, as well as poisonous centipedes and spiders and the like).  Also, Goodman Games had a scenario set in the Amazon Jungle that might help with the river travel part of the issue (in AOC-5 The Long Reach of Evil).

 

In the end, I'm just sorry to say that I couldn't find anything very helpful at all.


Edited by jlynn, 12 March 2015 - 04:34 PM.


#34 jlynn

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Posted 12 March 2015 - 04:43 PM

I did write a very short scenario for the in-development-hell "Cthulhu by ARCLIGHT" that could be pretty easily adjusted to the 20s Indochina:

 

http://www.theblacks...h-a-zulu-event/

That's actually very good!  It would make an excellent side-adventure too.  And, as you said, very easy to re-write into the '20s.



#35 Lammomedes

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 09:52 PM

We are indeed. 

 

Lammomedes, I have had no luck in finding anything set in SE Asia during the 1920s.  At least for Call of Cthulhu or Trail of Cthulhu (though I will admit my "Trail" library isn't nearly as complete as my CoC library is, so someone else may come up with something suitable from that source).  As you know, I came up with a couple of pulp mystery scenarios set in the general region, but nothing that gets you to where the Tcho-Tcho hang out.

 

I'm wondering if the scenario from "Mysteries of the Congo" couldn't be jiggered around with a bit to make it come out up along the Mekong instead.  Obviously the native villages would require some cosmetic re-working, but the "bad natives" could easily become Tcho-Tchos, and the climactic scene could be set in an ancient temple of the Angkor Wat variety.  Again, I'll refer you to GURPS Places of Mystery for maps of the temple as well as some discussion about the type of stonework done in it. 

 

Structurally, I'm thinking one journey up a jungle river would be pretty much like another, with suitable cosmetic changes (vegetation types, animal types, natives, that sort of thing) to get folks into the spirit of the thing.  I'll also point out that "Mother of Malaria" from Mythos Expeditions might have some good ideas on encounters and the like to use (though again, you'd have to replace African animal encounters with Asian ones -- the "good" news is that tigers and giant snakes and crocodiles abound in the area, as well as poisonous centipedes and spiders and the like).  Also, Goodman Games had a scenario set in the Amazon Jungle that might help with the river travel part of the issue (in AOC-5 The Long Reach of Evil).

 

In the end, I'm just sorry to say that I couldn't find anything very helpful at all.

 

Thanks for all your help Jlynn! I managed to take a look at "Mysteries of the Congo" and I think it could be rejiggered to become a decent enough SE Asia scenario. I am also thinking of redoing "The Plantation" and setting that as  French rubber plantation up the Mekong, though it does need a bit more of a rewrite since the start just isn't going to happen in Saigon (strange boy asks for help...maybe it might still work...hmm), but I am going to have switch the Yig Cult with something else more appropriate.

 

I might be able to pull something out of the Kenya Sourcebook for that matter, but maybe not. I'll have to dig in that more often. I'll also take a look at the Long Reach of Evil too now that you mentioned it.

I am just surprised how little is set in Southeast Asia. I think if I have some time this summer, I'll work on creating a monograph.


You could set 'The Plantation' somewhere past Lo Dung up the Nung River...

 

Already considered that...just need a different foe than Yig (and snakes) especially since the Tcho-Tcho and Chaugnar Faugn are from Southeast Asia..but using elephants isn't quite the same as snakes.


I did write a very short scenario for the in-development-hell "Cthulhu by ARCLIGHT" that could be pretty easily adjusted to the 20s Indochina:

 

http://www.theblacks...h-a-zulu-event/

 

WinstonP: Thanks for the heads up. That might work out quite well.


WinstonP and others:

 

I found "The Pool of Mr Binh" as a downloadable pdf (someone must have worked it up at some point).

http://www.theblacks..._of_Mr_Binh.pdf



#36 The_Tatterdemalion_King

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Posted 14 March 2015 - 11:00 PM

Already considered that...just need a different foe than Yig (and snakes) especially since the Tcho-Tcho and Chaugnar Faugn are from Southeast Asia..but using elephants isn't quite the same as snakes.


Why wouldn't you use snakes?
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#37 jlynn

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 12:30 AM

I am just surprised how little is set in Southeast Asia. I think if I have some time this summer, I'll work on creating a monograph.

 

Well, if you work one up, I'll sure buy it!  :-)

 

Also, given the number and types of snakes in the Mekong region, I'm thinking Yig might need much replacement after all, but if you prefer a different Big Bad, naturally, that's another thing entirely.



#38 Lammomedes

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 02:57 AM

Well, if you work one up, I'll sure buy it!  :-)

 

Also, given the number and types of snakes in the Mekong region, I'm thinking Yig might need much replacement after all, but if you prefer a different Big Bad, naturally, that's another thing entirely.

 

We did a bunch of playtesting with this group for a Yig based campaign that is yet to come out. One of the reasons I latched onto Chaugnar Faugn and the Tcho-Tcho as something largely overlooked by a lot of the 1920s adventures that exist. Plus, they come from SE Asia in at least one version of their background, so they seemed perfect fit. Yig just seems so much more Southwestern US than the Mekong river basin, at least IMHO.



#39 jlynn

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 06:23 AM

We did a bunch of playtesting with this group for a Yig based campaign that is yet to come out. One of the reasons I latched onto Chaugnar Faugn and the Tcho-Tcho as something largely overlooked by a lot of the 1920s adventures that exist. Plus, they come from SE Asia in at least one version of their background, so they seemed perfect fit. Yig just seems so much more Southwestern US than the Mekong river basin, at least IMHO.

I certainly understand wanting to work with something else, if you just finished a major work-up with Yig!  And there's absolutely no reason why you can't do one on the Tcho-Tcho and Chaugnar Faugn and let someone else play around with Yig if you choose to.  No such thing as a wrong answer here, I think!  The only write-up of Chaugner Faugn I remember was a particularly deadly pair of scenarios featuring him in Curse of the Cthonians, so he clearly hasn't been as overused as, say, "The King in Yellow" has lately!  ;-)

 

Though while I fully understand where that perception of Yig as a SW US kind of thing comes from ("The Mound"), the "Father of Serpents" would presumably be found anywhere there were serpents, so there wouldn't be anything inherently wrong with using him in the Mekong, or the Namibian karoo for that matter!  Either way though, I have to tell you I'm really looking forward to seeing this Yig campaign whereof you speak!



#40 WinstonP

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Posted 15 March 2015 - 12:01 PM

You could try Yhidra. She has a sacred site in Laos.
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