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Mixing occupations?


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#1 HellHound01

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 01:03 AM

How do other keepers go about mixing and matching occupations?

 

Example, a player wants to be a former soldier who is now a librarian? 




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#2 DadsAngry

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 01:22 AM

Have your player choose up to 8 skill that fit with their character model to be used as their profession.  



#3 Mysterioso

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 03:39 AM

EDU points for current profession and INT points for the past one?



#4 Ebon

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 05:29 AM

I'd probably be with Dads on this one, but if you'd like to really simulate that change in profession, then perhaps you could do a proportion of total skill points to each, so for instance you get EDUx(whatever your edition) skill points, half goes into soldier, half into librarian. If you're playing 7th edition, then perhaps it would be easier to just halve the skill points from each profession. If the character hasn't been a librarian for long, consider increasing the proportion of soldier skill points (ex. 70%) and decreasing that of the librarian skill points (30%) or vice versa. Alternatively, if they haven't been a librarian for long at all, consider giving the player only skill points from being a soldier, and having their personal interest points (based off INT) go into their 'librarian' skills to show how, until now, the job as a librarian was only a hobby (i.e. Mysterioso's suggestion).



#5 The_Tatterdemalion_King

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 05:54 AM

There's an article on the specific question (soldier to librarian) in Island of Ignorance.

 

More generally, you want to ask the player which occupation they've spent the most time doing, and assign that as the primary one (EDU) and cover what they learned from the other one via their INT points. 


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#6 Celebrim

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 05:33 AM

Characters who are 30 or older may take two professions, but with half usual benefits from each.  However, if this option is used, at least 5 points MUST be placed into every professional skill of both classes, with at least 10 points then placed if the skill is a professional skill of both classes.

For most 1e-6e era classes this means that you put EDU x 10 points in one class, and EDU x 10 points in another.   Basically, it lets you be a jack of all trades sort of character.   I force the investment of least some points in order to avoid the player using it solely to cherry pick the 'best' skills.

 



#7 MikeM

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Posted 14 November 2017 - 08:27 AM

To answer the original question at the top  - see the Investigator Handbook page 61 - Experienced Investigators, which includes war/service experience.


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#8 numtini

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Posted 21 November 2017 - 06:01 PM

I generally let people take anything they can reasonably justify. If someone had said something like career military to police, which is a very common real life career vector, then I'd probably just let them pick whatever they want from both if they can make a case for it.

 

But career military to career librarian sounds more like someone min-maxing and I'd probably give the hairy eyeball and just plain tell them no.



#9 Celebrim

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Posted 21 November 2017 - 11:00 PM

numtini, on 21 Nov 2017 - 1:01 PM, said:numtini, on 21 Nov 2017 - 1:01 PM, said:

I generally let people take anything they can reasonably justify. If someone had said something like career military to police, which is a very common real life career vector, then I'd probably just let them pick whatever they want from both if they can make a case for it.

 

But career military to career librarian sounds more like someone min-maxing and I'd probably give the hairy eyeball and just plain tell them no.

 

Actually, career military to career scholar is not an unusual career path even today, and was particularly common in the 19th century.  Retired officers would become school administrators and instructors, and since officers at least tend to be well educated and in the period often drawn from upper class families, it isn't that unusual.   Historical examples might include William Tecumseh Sherman, Edwin Howard Armstrong, and Peter Mansoor (which covers the normal eras).  Rather than claiming you couldn't do it and saying "No", I'd just force them to invest some token amount of points in the less desirable skills of the profession ("Yes, but...").   What you really are trying to avoid is someone cherry picking only the most valued and common sorts of skills, at which point if you are going to allow that you might as well do away with the notion of an occupation.   Which actually might be fine too, especially given how popular and advantageous 'Dilettante' tends to be. 


Edited by Celebrim, 21 November 2017 - 11:30 PM.


#10 Gaffer

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Posted 22 November 2017 - 01:37 PM

With America's tradition of citizen-soldiers, many students and even professors answered the call to colors during the Civil War and a lot of students/new graduates enlisted at the outbreak of World Wars I and II. After these wars most individuals returned to civilian life, picking up their academic careers or studies again. Also, career military officers were often educated at West Point or Annapolis, which provided fairly well-rounded collegiate studies.


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