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Master List of Lovecraftian TV shows


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#41 GBSteve

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Posted 20 May 2016 - 08:12 PM

The Omega Factor, about secret societies, government conspiracies, ESP and the occult.


Come read about Dreamhounds of Paris actually being played.
 
The Armitage Files, now with added Ennie Award.
Cthulhu Britannica: London Box Set, now with Golden Geek runner-up award.


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#42 yronimoswhateley

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 06:36 PM

...there were a few Lovecraftian moments in the original "Star Trek" ... I'm particularly thinking of the Kelvans, aliens from Andromeda that took on human forms and would "distill" people into a powdery polyhedron ("essential saltes," anyone?), as well as Sylvia and Korob, alien illusionists who looked a bit like tentacled stickbugs in their natural form. The mind-controlling jellyfish things from "Operation: Annihilate" were very creepy and Lovecrafty in their own way, as well...

 

Sorry to "necro" the thread, but as someone who hasn't seen this show since the 1980s, I just found out for the first time that the Star Trek episode you mentioned with the alien illusionists was one of two of the episodes written by H.P. Lovecraft's friend, Robert Bloch, which drop a reference to Lovecraft's "Old Ones" in throw-away dialogue.


"I would have written a shorter letter, but I did not have the time." - Blaise Pascal


#43 MrHandy

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Posted 12 January 2017 - 02:15 AM

I had recently mentioned in another thread that Outlander has a couple of Mythos references. It's not apparent in the episodes as aired, but the Blu-ray (and presumably DVD) of Season 2 has an extended scene in Episode 2 where Claire visits Master Raymond's shop for the first time, and he's showing her various things, including copies of Unausprechlichen Kulten by von Junzt and al-Azif (aka the Necronomicon) by "the mad Arab Abdul al-Hazred." One of these books is later shown again as evidence against him in the Star Chamber scene in Episode 7, though it is not named there. What Gillian does at the end of the final episode is also somewhat Mythosy.


Zombie Apocalypse: A Blood Brothers style play-by-post forum-based RPG using CoC rules
Space Oddity: Life on Mars/Ashes to Ashes/Call of Cthulhu in 1969 Philadelphia
The Terror Out of Time: Classic Doctor Who meets Call of Cthulhu in 1930 London

#44 cloud64

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 05:12 PM

I have recently finished watching Jordskott. A nice piece of TV Scandi Noir: 10 episodes of 1 hour. 
Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Jordskott
IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2309405/
 
Warning: involves child abduction.
 
The synopsis doesn't give any hints as to the show having any supernatural elements, but they slowly develop.

 

[From Wikipedia] 

Police inspector Eva Thörnblad (Moa Gammel returns to the village of Silverhöjd, seven years after her daughter Josephine disappeared beside a lake in the forest. Josephine's body was never found and it was presumed that she had drowned. Upon Eva's return, a boy is missing and Eva begins to look for similarities between this disappearance and that of her daughter. At the same time, she has to deal with the death and probate of her late father and his large timber felling and processing business, Thörnblad Cellulosa.

 
It builds the intrigue nicely, which keeps you coming back for more, and in true Lovecraft style, even at the end you're not completely clear about what happened – well, we weren't. Any more than that needs a spoiler tag.
 

Spoiler

 
It is very investigation driven, slowly delving deeper into the mystery through a variety of sources. Lots of stuff to steal for one's own scenarios.
 
Worth a watch. In the UK it was on ITV Encore, and we watched it via Now TV. Well, half of it because they took it down and we had to buy the final eps on the iTunes store. It's £10 for the lot, and I didn't feel hard done paying that to finish it off.



#45 SunlessNick

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 08:04 PM

True Detective (the first season) is low-hangig fruit for this thread.  In Cthulhu terms, its atmosphere is as if a Mythos event happening somewhere between the 1930's and 1950's, which sparked off a trail of madness that's been continuing to destroy lives long after the investigators and actual cultists and monsters and magic were gone.  Which is almost more bleak than if they were still around.



#46 christian

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Posted 04 March 2017 - 10:59 PM

My take on Jordskott was rather less enthusiastic ;-)

 

Like many others the world over, I was spellbound by The killing, and its heroine Sarah Lund, and loved Borgen and the Bridge.

 

Granted, some of the plot-twists in the Bridge were a bit over the edge ( how many conspiracies can exist with twisted masterminds fooling the police to get personal revenge?) , and some of the red herrings in The killing were just there to get to the requisite ten episodes BUT each and every character was well thought out and had an interesting arc even if it was sometimes abruptly terminated. And you really felt that you were there, in another country, with a different way of life, a different political system, etc etc. I could say the same for The missing, with James Nesbitt. The story was great, harrowing, the characters were well fleshed-out, and you could feel that you were there, in England and in the back of beyond in a French provincial town. JORDSKOTT is nothing like this. The characters are bleeeeah, their actions defy rationality, the plot follows along the dotted lines with mind-numbingly cretinous moments ( Oh, she seems to have died on us, let's cut off that electric wire I've just unplugged, strip the ends off and jolt her with electric current, we're sure to wake her up...) Eva, the main character, manages to emote rather well in the first episode, as a female cop whose child disappeared seven years ago and may or may not have turned up unexpectedly. But after that, it's all downhill. The character goes through each episode without ever becoming believable. Nordic Noir has made a habit of showing us actors who look real, who do not look as if they've all had plastic surgery, but this is way beyond that. Most characters act dumb, and look ugly. I mean, really ugly. The parade of unattractive men in this series has to be seen to be believed. And the workings of the town in which all this happens are so badly depicted that you never have the feeling that this place really exists. Local politicians, TV people, local police, industrialists, environment protectors, all go through the motions of their cliché cardboard characters. A special mention must be made of the youngish badly shaved Special Task Force cop who arrives at the beginning of the last episode to take over and show his contempt for the cops we've followed through the first nine episodes. His mission is to act tough, speak badly to, and demote "our heroes", and cheepishly disappear when the elderly spinstery chief of police who seems to have been there through the last century glares wordlessly at him for thirty seconds as a sign of disapproval. Oh, I forgot to mention the fantastic element. This is no Twin Peaks, believe me. The premise of "something strange lives in these woods" is unnerving at first and you hope that it will develop into something horrific or profound, but the scenario just piles on a few shocks and boring explanations without ever realising its potential. My advice is to stay clear of this. Unless you're an immortal monster hiding among humans while hoarding felt hats and coppery junk, in which case you won't feel cheated of ten hours of your life


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#47 Armitage72

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 02:40 AM

Sorry to "necro" the thread, but as someone who hasn't seen this show since the 1980s, I just found out for the first time that the Star Trek episode you mentioned with the alien illusionists was one of two of the episodes written by H.P. Lovecraft's friend, Robert Bloch, which drop a reference to Lovecraft's "Old Ones" in throw-away dialogue.

 

The other Robert Bloch episode, "What Little Girls Are Made Of", was essentially "At the Mountains of Madness", with humanoid androids instead of Shoggoths.  An ancient alien race (referred to as the Old Ones) manufactured a race of slaves, which eventually became too intelligent and rose up and destroyed their creators.  They even lived in caverns under an frozen environment.



#48 Thekinginpurple

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Posted 11 March 2017 - 07:46 PM

Would anyone else agree with me in that I consider the Prisoner (the one from the 70's with Patrick McGoohan and the deadly bubbles) Lovecraftian? It focuses on a spy who is taken to a strange village where nothing is quite as it seems, and disturbing practices and phenomena are plentiful. Also in a similar vein the black and white lodges from Twin Peaks (they remind me of that passage from the Call of Cthulhu where Castro rabbits on about how great Cthulhu is and how morality should be discarded)?



#49 Shrike

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Posted 11 March 2017 - 09:42 PM

There are a plethora of homages to The Prisoner in Delta Green: Countdown, so you're not alone in your thinking.



#50 yronimoswhateley

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Posted 11 March 2017 - 11:12 PM

I added an entry for The Prisoner into the Yog-Sothoth dotcom Wiki earlier this year, seeing some promise in the series as a setting/premise for a Call of Cthulhu campaign (possibly set in a variation on the Dreamlands, which to me seems appropriate for the strange location, buildings, costumes, and customs of The Village).

 

The Wiki entry is, of course, a stub - if anyone would like to expand on its content with an eye toward a Lovecraftian adaptation, you may feel free.  Be seeing you....


Edited by yronimoswhateley, 11 March 2017 - 11:13 PM.

"I would have written a shorter letter, but I did not have the time." - Blaise Pascal


#51 MrHandy

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 04:02 PM

 I absolutely agree! I put a reference to The Prisoner in my homebrewed scenario The Shadow Over Dunwich. There's an albino shoggoth named Rover that puts in its first terrifying appearance in this thread: http://www.callofcth...hp?f=330&t=5098


Zombie Apocalypse: A Blood Brothers style play-by-post forum-based RPG using CoC rules
Space Oddity: Life on Mars/Ashes to Ashes/Call of Cthulhu in 1969 Philadelphia
The Terror Out of Time: Classic Doctor Who meets Call of Cthulhu in 1930 London