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The Evil Gun Part 2 - The Drifter Comes to Town

Posted by Max_Writer , in Call of Cthulhu, Campaign Log 01 March 2018 · 71 views

CoC 7e

* * *


Marshal Pierce was stopped at the edge of the camp by soldiers. He showed his badge.


“I’m sorry, sir,” one of the soldiers said. “No civilians.”


“I’m not a civilian,” Marshal Pierce said.


“Yes, you are, sir.”


“I’m a federal marshal. I’m here on government business.”


“Do you have some kind of papers?”


“I don’t need papers.”


“Yes, you do, sir.”


“Let me talk to your superior.”


“Wait here.”


* * *


“Who are these people and why are they here?” Captain Black asked Brandon Stalloid.


The officer sat behind a makeshift desk made of barrels and boards in his tent. He did not seem happy about the two women in his camp.


“This is a well-known doctor in my area and … her assistant,” Professor Stalloid said.


Captain Black stood up and looked over the two women.


“I know many … native tales about native magic …” Jacali said. “And I think that there may be horrible curses on this place.”


Captain Black rolled his eyes.


“But I mostly just help the doctor,” Jacali said.


“All right Professor Stalloid, if you say so,” Captain Black finally said.


He got the women’s names and made them sign papers that bound them not to mention anything they saw in the camp under penalty of jail and massive fines. Jacali couldn’t read them so they had her make her mark and witnessed it.


They were sent into the mines.


* * *


Marshal Pierce was made to wait about 10 minutes before he was shown to the tent of Captain Black. Father Bishop had caught up to him by then and was allowed to accompany the man.


“How can I help you, sir?” the captain said.


“I’m here on government business concerning Dan McGoohan,” Marshal Pierce said.


“He’s escaped. He’s not here.”


“Yes, but he was in these mines before, correct?”


“Yes, he was.”


“I’ll be in and out. I just need to track him. I will not interfere with whatever is going on here.”


“You can track him outside of the encampment. My men have been all over this place. They’re going to ruin any tracks that might be anywhere within these tents.”


“I’m sorry, I just need to check. I don’t care what these men have done … or haven’t done … to these tracks.”


Captain Black frowned.


“God has sent us a clue that something here could help us,” Father Bishop said.


Marshal Pierce looked at the man like he was crazy. Captain Black rolled his eyes and just shook his head.


Marshal Pierce noted it was his jurisdiction and he could get the paperwork but that would just take time, time he didn’t have. Captain Black, obviously annoyed at the two men, finally acquiesced.


“Fine,” he said. “Fine!”


He told one of the soldiers to escort the men into the mines and let them look around for tracks and then escort them out. The man saluted him and led them to the mines.


* * *


Professor Stalloid escorted Dr. Weisswald and Jacali to the chamber in the mine that held the Crescent. They were amazed that it was just about exactly the same as the drawing of the medicine man in Nevada. They thought it had the same number of spikes but then realized there were more on the actual item than on their drawing.


Professor Terwilliger was delighted they were there.


“Oh!” he said. “Oh! Professor Stalloid! Oh!”


“And friends,” Dr. Weisswald said.


“Welcome!” Professor Terwilliger said. “We’ve been testing this morning and trying to use the saws again but it hasn’t worked at all.”


Professor Stalloid whispered to the man to speak a little less loudly about projects whilst in town.


“Oh!” Professor Terwilliger said. “Oh! You’re right. Thank you.”


He turned to the women.


“Remember, don’t speak loudly about projects in town,” he said.


Professor Stalloid told him he brought the women in so they would have an excuse for knowing if anyone found out. The women looked at the Crescent as Professor Terwilliger told them some of their plans for the day with the device.


“Wait, are they here to touch it?” he asked Professor Stalloid.


“What?” Professor Stalloid said.


“Okay! Okay!”


“No! We’re not ready for human studies yet.”


“Oh yeah yeah yeah. Don’t touch it. Don’t touch it! I could be quite dangerous! Oh, they’ve cleared them so I can tell them anything and I told them last night so we’re good!”


“That’s why I brought ‘em. I’ve got your back.”


“So, you know about the dust. We’ve done some tests but … are you a biologist?”


Dr. Weisswald nodded.


“That’s prefect!” Dr. Terwilliger said. “That’s great.”


He showed her the dust and the chemical lab while Professor Stalloid set up electrolysis to see if the energy coming off the thing would be enough to silver coat something. He dumped in the pellets of two shotgun shells, connected the wire, and left the silver water. Dr. Terwilliger told them about the item being embedded in rock for 50 million years. He noted he wished they had some of the prisoners that were originally there because some of them saw what happened and a first-hand account would be useful.


“When did the prisoners escape?” Dr. Weisswald asked.


“Two weeks ago,” Professor Terwilliger said.


“Well, maybe we can get Wilder to check it out. He’s a tracker.”




“Wasn’t he going with that face man?” Jacali said. “To track prisoners already.”


“Yes, if he can get some of the prisoners who were eye witnesses, I would love to talk to them,” Professor Terwilliger said.


Professor Stalloid found that his experiment was working. He found it quite interesting.


“Was Dan McGoohan one of the prisoners?” Dr. Weisswald asked.


“He was!” Professor Terwilliger said. “He was one of the escaped prisoners. There were about 20 of them. Some of them didn’t see anything, because we’ve already questioned a few that were brought in. They were in the back. When all the prisoners started running away, they just started running with them.”


Marshal Pierce, Father Bishop, and another soldier entered the large cave. Dr. Weisswald recognized the Federal marshal badge on his chest. Professor Terwilliger went to him.


“Are you more scientists?” he asked.


“Absolutely not,” Marshal Pierce said.


“Oh,” Professor Terwilliger said.


He noticed the badge for the first time.


“Oh, federal marshal. Oh,” he said. “Well, never broken the law myself.”


“I wouldn’t think you had,” Marshal Pierce said.


“Stalloid, there’s a Federal marshal here,” Professor Terwilliger said. “I think he’s here to arrest you.”


“I don’t think he is,” Professor Stalloid said. “I-I haven’t done anything wrong lately.”


“Oh,” Professor Terwilliger said.


“Lately?” Marshal Pierce said.


“Lately … uh … well,” Professor Stalloid said. “Some things I’ve done are questionable.”


“What have you done, my child?” Father Bishop said.


“Well … I made these silver … balls … right now,” Professor Stalloid said.


“Well, it’s a priest!” Professor Terwilliger said. “How quaint.”


“Man of law, man of science, man of God,” Marshal Pierce mused. “What seems to be happening here?”


“Oh, we don’t want to bore you, sir,” Professor Stalloid said.


“You’re not going to bore me,” Marshal Pierce said. “Speak.”


Professor Stalloid told him about his electrolysis experiment that was causing silver to adhere to the lead buckshot of his shotgun shells. It was amazingly boring as the man showed him the buckshot and explained exactly what had caused it.


Father Bishop went over to look at the Crescent. He’d never seen anything like it before in his life.


When Professor Stalloid brought up the prisoners touching the thing and ripping shackles, Marshal Pierce stopped him.


“Dan McGoohan?” he said.


“I don’t know,” Professor Stalloid said. “I wasn’t here. I don’t know which prisoners were here.”


“Dan McGoohan was one of the prisoners that escaped. You said they touched this and their shackles came off?”


“Yeah, and then they turned to dust.”


“The shackles or the people?”


“The people.”


“You telling me one of these things is Dan McGoohan.”


“No. I don’t know who those are.”


Marshal Pierce sighed.


“I wasn’t here,” Professor Stalloid said.


“I understand that,” Marshal Pierce said.


“We can’t identify those people. They’re piles of dust, sir!”


“What I’m trying to say is─”


“Dental records do not exist!”


“There’s no teeth!” Professor Terwilliger said.


“Even the teeth are dust!” Professor Stalloid said.


“That’s according to our biologist here,” Professor Terwilliger said. “This is Doctor … I’m sorry, I didn’t catch your name.”


“Weisswald,” Dr. Weisswald said.


“Weisswald!” Professor Terwilliger said.


“I know Dan McGoohan was one of the three and you’re saying the three prisoners are these dust piles, then by putting that together, Dan McGoohan is one of these dust piles!” Marshal Pierce said.


“If you say so!” Professor Stalloid said.


“I-I don’t think it was established,” Professor Terwilliger said. “I believe that Dan McGoohan was one of the ones who escaped, sir!”


He looked them over.


“I think you need to go talk to the Captain!” Professor Stalloid said, turning back to his work.


“I’ve already talked to the Captain!” Marshal Pierce said, frustrated.


Father Bishop read last rites over the ashes. The soldiers gave the man a look.


Marshal Pierce asked the scientists if there was any way to determine who the three people were.


“Someday, maybe we’ll have the ability to … I don’t know, to tell a person by tiny pieces of their flesh, but we’re not that far yet,” Professor Terwilliger said. “I’ve had some ideas though. I’ve had some great ideas about that.”


“Do you have a list of all the prisoners that escaped?” Marshal Pierce asked.


“The town marshal might!” Professor Terwilliger said.


Marshal Pierce cursed.


“Or possibly Captain Black,” Professor Terwilliger said.


“Talk to the Captain!” Professor Stalloid said.


“Good luck with that!” Professor Terwilliger said. “Nice fellow.”


“I’m sure he is,” Marshal Pierce said.


“His food is terrible!” Professor Terwilliger called after him. “But nice fellow.”


Marshal Pierce left.


Dr. Weisswald’s test verified what they had thought. The little piles of dust were composed of everything that made up a human being almost as if all of the liquid had been removed from a man, leaving only that. The powder wasn’t ash but much finer. She also learned they had tested lizards and rats touching the thing.


“Well, I don’t know what to do with this thing,” Jacali said. “I don’t really want to touch it.”


Dr. Stalloid touched the thing with a pickaxe but nothing apparently happened.


“Whomever that one man was, the impatient one, the one who definitely did not wait,” Jacali said. “He really wanted this thing though.”


“I remember that guy,” Professor Stalloid said.


Jacali put a rock in the middle of the circle but nothing happened.


* * *


Captain Black did, indeed, have a list of men who escaped. There were 30 of them with various charges. He had a soldier write up a copy for Marshal Pierce. About a third of them had been caught and a two or three others had been found dead in the wilderness. The list had been updated from the day before.


Dan McGoohan was listed as having not been found. Captain Black was of the opinion that he had probably left the territory, otherwise he would have been caught.


Captain Black ended up talking to Marshal Pierce for several hours, keeping him and Father Bishop at the camp. They ate lunch there.


* * *


Gemma Jones helped out around Leone’s Saloon, fitting in and getting to know the girls. They all seemed very nice though Margaret Smithson was a little jealous of her. As she was working, she heard gunshots in the distance. They seemed to be coming from the north side of town. She went to the entrance of Leone’s and leaned out the front door, looking around.


A man came down the street a minute or so later. He looked like a drifter. He was dirty and grungy. His eyes were small and mean-looking, mostly obscured by the brim of his hat. He wore a long coat and he had a pair of guns on his belt. A half-burned, unlit cigarillo jutted from the left corner of his mouth. She didn’t recognize him. Other people he walked by gave him a wide berth. People off the street talking stopped when he walked by, just staring at the drifter. Only the sound of his spurs jingling rung down the street.


He ambled to Leone’s, scowling. He gave the girl a look as he walked by her.


She felt herself breathing hard, nervous and afraid, though she didn’t know why.


He sat at a table and ordered whiskey. The bartender brought the man a bottle and a glass.


She left the room quickly, going to a small closet with a window and closing the door. She slid down the door to the floor and started crying.


* * *


After several hours, Wilder and West managed to track down one of the prisoners to a cave on the plains. The man was half-starved and desperate for water. He had been eating raw rabbits and was ready to go back.


“Oh thank God!” he said when he saw them.


West got into the man’s face.


“So, I’m wondering … did you see Dan McGoohan?” he asked the man.


“Not for a couple weeks,” the escaped prisoner said. “Not since we escaped.”


“You see which way he went?”


“I didn’t see which way he went. I ran! You don’t know what happened in there! You don’t know what happened in there! That face? That ain’t half as scary as what I saw! And that face is scary! Makes me wanna puke!”


West backhanded him in the face.


“That ain’t nothin’!” the man said. “You seen what I seen?”


“What did you see?” West said.


“Stick a nail in my fingernail!”


“What did you see?”


“I saw ‘em touch it. They touched that thing! They touched that thing! And then - and then - and then they started ripping the shackles off like they were made of paper! Paper! Those’re iron shackles! Just pop! Just pulled ‘em right off! And-and-and-and then they started - they pulled out something out of it and waved it around, like they were gonna touch us and the others are touching it like they were in love with it! Like it was a woman! And-and there’s this … purple light … and-and-and we … we said ‘No!’ And we ran! Dan McGoohan was runnin’ too! Last I saw him, we were runnin’ out that mine! The overseers, there’s only five of ‘em, you can’t stop all 30 men! We ran ‘em over like a train!”


“So those three things, what were they?”


“The three what?”


“The three men that touched it. They transformed?”


“Yeah! I dunno! They just ripped the chains off! And then we left. We left ‘em. I was afraid they was gonna touch me with that thing they found! That rod or whatever it was!”


“All right.”


West tossed the man a canteen and he desperately drank the water out of it. Wilder handed him some beef jerky and then they tied his wrists behind his back. They returned to town with him and handed him over to the town marshal.


* * *


Marshal Pierce had verified his list with the town marshal and found it up-to-date except for the name of a man who had brought in just that day. He had a similar list and told Marshal Pierce the man had been brought in by a man with terrible scars on his face and a man wearing a bear. When he checked the name listed with the bounty, he told Marshal Pierce the scarred man was called Jack West. He hadn’t caught the bear man’s name. He also asked Marshal Pierce to pass on to Jack West that he’d sent the telegram.


* * *


When they met in Leone’s for dinner that night, they saw a new face there. The dirty drifter was sitting alone at a table, no one near him, with an unlit cigarillo in his mouth, drinking whiskey. He drank and paid and drank and paid, never speaking except to the bartender.


When they were all seated, Stalloid took out a deck of cards and asked if they’d like to have a friendly game of poker.


“I don’t play, sir,” Jacali said. “Wilder, how’s your day been?”


“We … uh … went out at dawn to the surrounding hills and found a … half starving man … who had been feasting on … hares and rats and all manner of small critter,” Wilder said. “He … did not know much … so we brought him back into town and … gave him to the sheriff.”


“We found the horn that the man who did not wait at all, the impatient one, was talking about,” Jacali said. “They said the prisoners who were escaping might know something about it. They saw something in the cave. Maybe. Some of them touched it and there are some ashen piles of what looks like used to be people near it. We haven’t touched it yet, because we think it might be dangerous.”


“He said it turned ‘em into monsters,” West said. “He said they looked scarier than me.”


“That would be a sight to behold,” Jacali said.


Marshal Pierce stood nearby.


“I’ve seen scarier,” Professor Stalloid said, putting his cards away. “Take a seat Marshal.”


“I don’t gamble,” Marshal Pierce said.


“So, some people touched it and didn’t turn to dust?” Dr. Weisswald said.


“As far as we know,” Professor Stalloid said.


“They left them behind,” Wilder said.


“Everybody ran away,” Professor Stalloid said.


“Well if they touched it and turned into monsters, maybe they didn’t immediately disintegrate,” Jacali said.


“But they were close to the Horn when they were disintegrated,” Dr. Weisswald said. “At least, they didn’t leave it.”


Marshal Pierce put his hand on the back of West’s chair.


“Let me buy you a drink at the bar,” he said.


“Appreciate it, marshal,” West said. “I’ll take that drink.”


Marshal Pierce told the priest to find out what he could there and he and West went to the bar. He told West he didn’t know what the people were talking about with all the talk of monsters.


Town Marshal Morton entered Leone’s and looked around. His eyes finally rested on the drifter. He asked the drifter about the gunfire that happened earlier.


“I was defending myself,” the other man said husky near-whisper that carried even across the wide room.


He told the marshal the two men drew on him and he had to defend himself. The room had gone quiet and someone nearby pointed out the dead men were hot heads and bullies and it was not really surprising. The bartender piped up, noting the stranger had been real peaceable since he’d come into Leone’s that afternoon. Marshal Morton seemed very nervous about talking to the man and merely nodded and left.


* * *


Across the room, Gemma Jones was between songs. She couldn’t help but hear, just like everyone else in the place. The drifter continued to drink as the noise in the saloon rose once again.


* * *


Father Bishop approached their table.


“Bear man,” he said.


“The bear man has a name,” Dr. Weisswald said.


“Like most of us,” Jacali said.


“I don’t know it,” Father Bishop said.


“It would be a good question to ask rather than saying ‘bear man,” Jacali said.


“Hey, Father Man,” Professor Stalloid quipped.


“What do you think I was getting to?” Father Bishop said. “You didn’t let me finish my sentence.”


“You could say “Hello, sir.’”


“He doesn’t necessarily look like a ‘sir.’”


“Ah, so ‘madam.’”


“What are your names? If you don’t mind my asking.”


“My name is─” Wilder said.


“Professor Brandon Stalloid!” the professor interrupted. “Saver of children! Healer of women … and men alike!”


His voice carried. People looked up from their drinks and conversations and card games. Gemma Jones, always the professional, noticed but continued singing.


“And my name is Jacali,” the Indian woman said.


“Jacali,” Father Bishop said. “Interesting name. Interesting person. You, madam?”


“Weisswald,” Dr. Weisswald said.


“A pleasure,” Father Bishop said.


He looked at Wilder.


“And … uh …” he said.


“My name is Wilder,” he said.


“Nice to meet you,” Father Bishop said.


“But you can call me Bear Man.”


“Nice to meet you.”


“It will not offend me.”


“I’m Father Peter Bishop.”


“Nice to meet you as well, Father,” Jacali said.


* * *


Marshal Pierce asked the bartender for two glasses of whiskey. The bartender dropped two glasses on the table and then poured the whiskey in both sloppily. He shoved one to each of them and got his money.


“The man you captured,” Marshal Pierce said. “He was one of the prisoners, correct?”


“Yeah,” West said.


“You’re looking for Dan McGoohan as well, correct?”


“I sure am. Need the money.”


“Employed the help of … bear man over there?”


“Wilder’s been very useful.”


“Wilder? That’s his name?”


“I didn’t catch his last name. Not sure if he had one.”


“I’m just gonna be one hundred percent with you. I don’t know which name’s more fake: Wilder or Jack West. Regardless of last names. I would like to team up.”


“Having an extra gun’s not always a bad thing. You good at finding people too, Marshal?”


“Probably not as good as … that wild man over there, but …”


“But …”


“My jurisdiction can get us places you couldn’t normally get.”


“That is valuable.”


“Here’s the deal I’m gonna make. You can have the bounty. I care not for that money. But what I do care for is Dan McGoohan survives. I must speak to him alive.”


“Oh, I can definitely assist you there. I’m an expert marksman. I’ve disarmed many a man.”


“I usually shoot to kill but … in this case I need him alive. That is my one rule.”


“All righty, if I get all the money.”


“With Wilder. What does a man of his …stature want with money?”


“I’m not sure. Could be, perhaps, he buys his pelts.”


“He buys his pelts?”


“I dunno. I didn’t ask him any personal questions.”


Marshal Pierce looked across the room at the stranger.


“So, you haven’t spoken to him yet, correct?” he asked West. “The drifter?”


“No, not yet, but he looks like he might be looking for McGoohan too,” West said. “Might know something.”


West looked at the man with his bulging eye.


“What do you say we take him some whiskey over there and ask him some questions?” Marshal Pierce said.


“Not a bad idea,” West said.


The drifter got up from the table and walked towards the bar.


“Well, looks like we got him right where we want him,” Marshal Pierce said.


As the man reached the bar, Marshal Pierce ordered three more glasses of whiskey.


“One for my new friend here,” Marshal Pierce said, pointing towards the drifter.


The man didn’t pay him any mind.


“Much obliged,” he merely said to the bartender in a way that didn’t sound like he actually was.


He dropped some coins on the bar for the bartender and turned to leave.


“You forgot your glass I just bought you here, sir,” Marshal Pierce said to the man.


The drifter stopped. He turned around and looked at the man from under the brim of his hat for what felt like a long time. The saloon went quiet. Only Gemma Jones singing continued. She stared at the drifter in terror.


The drifter took the whiskey, drank it down, and put the glass down on the bar.


“Much obliged,” he said to Marshal Pierce.


Marshal Pierce didn’t think he was.


The drifter turned and walked out of saloon. Gemma Jones finished her song just as the man left. The piano player, a bowler-wearing man with a half-finished bottle of whiskey on the piano, finished the song and took another drink himself. People started talking once again.


“He’s less friendly than I am,” West said.


“Hurry,” Marshal Pierce said. “Let’s catch him.”


They drank down their whiskey and headed out of the saloon. When they got to the porch they saw the drifter head around the corner and followed him to Main Street. He was heading north.


“Usually when I buy a man a drink, he gives me his name,” Marshal Pierce called to the man.


The drifter stopped and turned around very slowly.


“I ain’t no usually,” the drifter said.


He turned and walked way.


“What is a man who isn’t ‘usual’ go this time of day?” Marshal Pierce said.


The drifter stopped again. He didn’t turn around this time.


“Man needs a place to lay his head once his thirst is quenched,” he said. “If it’s ever.”


He walked away.


“Dan McGoohan mean anything to you?” Marshal Pierce called after him.


The drifter just walked away. Marshal Pierce growled under his breath. He watched the man walk up the street and go into Eastwood’s Saloon and Hotel. He gave the man a minute or so before he followed him. West went with him.


The proprietor, John Eastwood, stood behind the desk set in the front of the saloon. He looked uncomfortable. There was a register book and Marshal Pierce turned it around and looked at it. He saw the names Dr. Eva Weisswald, Jacali, and Jack West, the last people to sign it. Marshal Pierce asked about the man who had just come in.


“Wouldn’t sign,” Eastwood said. “I wasn’t about to make him.”


“Did he … pay well?” Marshal Pierce said.


“He paid for the room. He paid for a week.”


“But not more? For you to stay quiet? For you to cover for him or anything like that?”


“No sir.”


“Doesn’t seem to be a man with something to hide?”


“If he had paid extra, you should probably try to bribe me to find out, shouldn’t ya? But he didn’t, Marshal. He did not pay me any extra to keep my mouth shut.”


“Did you just ask a Federal marshal to bribe you?”


“No, I’m trying to help you know how to do your job right.”


Eastwood laughed it off like the whole thing had been a joke. Marshal Pierce laughed to, putting his hand on his gun.


“He didn’t pay me any extra,” Eastwood said again. “I don’t know his name. I asked him to sign the register book. He just walked up the stairs. Did you see that man? Gives me the creeps! I wasn’t about to ask him nothing.”


“Did he pay for multiple nights or just for tonight?”


“He paid for one week, exactly. Said he only needed one week. I don’t know what that means. I don’t care.”


Marshal Pierce turned to West.


“Man comes into town pays for a week,” he said. “Sounds like a bounty hunter to me, to be honest. He’s looking for Dan McGoohan. And we better find him before he kills him. ‘Cause that’s a man doesn’t take any bounty alive.”


“Sounds about right,” West said.


Marshal Pierce slid a silver dollar to Eastwood.


“If you ever find out his name, you tell me first,” he said. “Agreed?”


Eastwood took the silver dollar and tucked it away.


“Yes sir,” he said.


“And any time he walks in, maybe just nudge the registry just a little bit,” Marshal Pierce said.


Eastwood looked nervous and told the man he’d do what he could but he wanted as little to do with the drifter as possible.


“As does most of this town,” Marshal Pierce said. “Have a good night.”


They went back to Leone’s.


* * *


“I saw you earlier at the mine,” Father Bishop said to the others at the table.


“Yes, and a priest at the mine was very surprising as well,” Jacali said.


“I was with the marshal.”




“He’s looking for Dan McGoohan. I wish to read him his final rites.”


“Yeah, the marshal made that very clear,” Professor Stalloid said. “And I don’t think he knows what looking for Dan McGoohan is like. He really, really wanted it to be one of those three bodies. I couldn’t explain it to him.”


Dr. Weisswald asked Wilder if they could go with them the next day to track Dan McGoohan.


“We’re not interested in the bounty,” Jacali said.


“No,” Dr. Weisswald said.


“At least I’m not,” Jacali said.


“Neither am I,” Father Bishop said.


“I have … no qualms about it personally,” Wilder said. “Though you should take that up with … Mr. West … as he is the one that did hire me.”


“The guy with the face?” Dr. Weisswald said.


“Yeah, I don’t really like talking with him at all,” Jacali said. “Could you do it for me, please?”


“I can do it,” Father Bishop said.


“Yes,” Wilder said. “Let the … preacher man speak to him.”


“We don’t let no man speak for us,” Dr. Weisswald said.


“I just don’t like seeing his face very much,” Jacali said.


“By the way, if any of you would ever need to repent anything from your past, feel free to call,” Father Bishop said.


“I think …” Jacali said.


They decided they would just show up the next morning with them and see what happened.


Marshal Pierce and Jack West returned to drink at the bar. Father Bishop joined them.


“Mr. West,” the priest said. “Would you mind if I and another of Mr. Wilder’s associates join you and him in trying to find Mr. McGoohan tomorrow. None of us want anything to do with the bounty, it’s just …”


“Well, if you don’t care about the money then I don’t care if you’re there,” West said.


Father Bishop returned to the table and told them what he had said. Then he returned to drink with the men at the bar.


* * *


When Gemma Jones finished singing for the night, Dr. Weisswald approached the stage along with a few other people. The piano player was chugging on the whiskey bottle. The other admirers were all men, there to compliment her, give her a silver dollar, or even proposition her. Dr. Weisswald was the only woman and, with her height, white hair, and doeskin clothing stood out from the men.


“Your singing is the best I’ve ever heard,” Dr. Weisswald said.


“Oh!” Gemma said. “Thank you. I do appreciate that. I’m … I’m not sure I’ve seen you before.”


“I’m Eva. Call me Eva.”


“Eva. I’m Gemma. But I’m sure you know that.”


“Uh-huh. Are you just here for the week or …”


“Oh, I’m just here for a few weeks before I go wherever the wind takes me.”


“Do you know where that might be next?”


“Who’s to say? And who’s asking?”


“Uh … me? No reason.”


“Come sit. Would you like to have a drink?”


“Ah, tea would be fine.”


The two women found a table and sat down, getting tea. Some of the men wanted to join them but a glare from Dr. Weisswald and a word from Gemma sent them on their way.


They had a nice conversation, Dr. Weisswald mentioning there was an artifact they were investigating and they were looking for the escaped prisoners as they would know more about it.


“Ooh,” Gemma said. “An undiscovered artifact. How interesting.”


“Well, I mean … it’s discovered now,” Dr Weisswald, ever-pragmatic, said with a kind smile.


“Well yes,” Gemma said. “Yes.”


They talked for a little while in a friendly fashion. Dr. Weisswald also talked about some of the others, especially Wilder and Jacali. She told her about Professor Stalloid and his elixirs as well. Gemma wondered if Professor Terwilliger had anything to do with the artifact.


* * *


That evening at the Eastwood Saloon those who were staying there heard a strange and unsettling whistling. It seemed to be coming from inside the hotel rooms. It had an eerie ululating tune but it was not very nice. Jacali looked out of her window and soon realized it was in one of the adjacent rooms. Though that window was also open, it seemed like whomever was whistling was standing back far enough from it that she couldn’t see them.


Dr. Weisswald got Jacali and they went to the room where it was coming from. The whistling stopped when they knocked on the door and then the doorknob rattled and the door opened. The drifter stood there. He looked them both over.


“Not interested,” he said.


He started to close the door but Jacali put her hand onto the door just before it closed. She pushed it open. He stood there behind it, glaring at the two.


“We ain’t that type of girls,” she said.


The man let his gaze slowly settle on each of them.


“All right,” he said.


Jacali felt pressure on the door as he pushed on it to close it again. She didn’t let him.


“You the one doing that whistling?” she said.


The man looked at her.


“Yes,” he said. “Sometimes at night … you gotta whistle up your company, don’t you?”


“Whistle up your company?” Dr. Weisswald said.


“Are you coming in … or are you staying out?” the drifter said.


Jacali looked at Dr. Weisswald.


“Whistling’s keeping me up,” Jacali said. “Just hold it down a little bit.”


“Once you let go of the door,” the drifter said.


She glared at the man and, just for a second, his eyes glowed with an unnatural luminescence. Jacali was shocked by the strange and eerie occurrence, removing her hand from the door. The drifter closed it and they heard it lock. The two woman looked at each other before returning to their rooms.


* * *


When gunfire rang through the village in the middle of the night, it woke up several people through the town. Father Bishop got dressed, ran to Marshal Pierce’s room, and banged on the door. The other man cracked the door with a gun in his hand. When he saw it was the priest, he opened the door the rest of the way.


“I heard some gunshots outside,” the priest said.


“All right, let me get dressed real quick,” Marshal Pierce said, closing the door.


Another door opened and Lambert Otto peeked out in his long underwear and boots pulled hastily on.


“What the hell are you doing out here at this hour?” he said.


“Getting the marshal,” Father Bishop said.




“I heard a noise outside. Go back to bed, sir.”


“But … but …”


“It is a matter of the law. Do not worry.”


Marshal Pierce came out of his door.


“Who you talking to?” he said.


“Um … a man,” Father Bishop said.


He pointed at Otto. Otto looked at the man in surprise and saw his badge.


“You’re a marshal, aren’t you?” he said. “The marshal that’s been around town?”


“Yeah, Clayton Pierce,” the marshal said. “And you?”


“Lambert Otto,” the other man said. “Bounty Hunter.”


“Lambert, get dressed,” Marshal Pierce said. “You’re coming with us.”


The man scratched his head and went back into the room, quickly getting dressed. Father Bishop went to his room and retrieved his crossbow. The three of them headed downstairs and found Wilder in the saloon. They all headed out and soon found where the gunfire had come from.


Marshal Morton was in one of the crossroads of the town. He’d been gunned down and was badly injured.


“Father, do you know first aid?” Marshal Pierce said. “Wilder, are there any track?”


The priest nodded and got to work on the man but then Marshal Morton gasped his last and died.


“I didn’t have anything to stop the bleeding with,” Father Bishop said.


“What’s it look like?” Marshal Pierce said. “Multiple guns?”


The priest told him the man had been hit with at least five bullets. The sheriff’s own Colt Peacemaker lay on the ground next to him, still smoking. He had obviously fought back whomever attacked him.


“Somebody lured him out and killed him,” Marshal Pierce said. “Wilder! Tracks! What do you see?”


Wilder found a pair of footprints heading south towards Neff Hill Graveyard. Marshal Pierce said they’d go to the livery stables and get the horses.


“I need Jack West,” he said. “Father, go to Eastwood’s. Get the rest of them. Find a doctor that actually knows what the hell they’re doing and make sure they come. No offense, but you are a father. Wilder Man and Lambert, you’re with me. Get your horses. We’re gonna ride them down.”


They separated.


* * *